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Baitcaster float fishing reel - Daiwa Zillion TW HD 2022

645 Views 16 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  chrome100
For anyone interested in purchasing a new baitcaster right for float fishing for Steelhead. Japan dropped the new 2022 model and it’s on sale now. It’s a direct upgrade from the Tatula’s when I comes to float fishing with a baitcaster. Better drag system, sealed bearings, better spool technology. Currently going for 287$ from Amazon Japan for a 7.1 ratio reel(made in Japan). US still has the model from 2018(made in Thailand), so I’d recommend purchasing one directly from Japan.

Okay, service announcement is done.

I placed my order and will hope to give a comparison to my Daiwa Tatula 150.

Mini review on the Daiwa Tatula 150

Dislikes:
I like the Tatula, but the spool release trigger seems to lock up after a few months of heavy abuse on fish and water. Have issues with the drag as well getting sticky after heavy use too. Guessing it’s not very well sealed and water washes most the grease from inside. Been using it for a couple of months since last deep clean and drag is starting to stick again. Curious to see how the zillion performs compared to this.

Likes:
Still one of the best float fishing reels out there. Easy casting, good gear ratio, deep spool, less backlashes thanks to the tws system, and Extremely easy to palm. Pretty affordable option as well.
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Oh man, you're going to love the Zillion. Made in Japan, insanely smooth, and a true free floating spool that's only held in place by the bearings. They're so cheap right now due to the exchange rate. If you were to buy a US version from a shop on this side of the world you'd pay about $350 to $400 depending on where you got it. The Tatula is a nice reel, but it will never be like a Zillion. The Zillion is in an entirely different league. The only thing better is the Steez, which it shares some parts with I might add.
Exchange rate plus reels being made in Japan has me spoiled. Most my recent purchases have Been direct from Japan, not only getting better build quality, but cheaper price compared to the stuff in the US market.

I’m never going to get the same performance as a centerpin out of a baitcaster, but hopefully this will bridge that gap a bit more.

I saw the Steez and had a hard time justifying an extra 100$ for a minor jump in performance/features from Zillon to Steez, compared to big difference in the zillion and tatula.


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Oh man, you're going to love the Zillion. Made in Japan, insanely smooth, and a true free floating spool that's only held in place by the bearings. They're so cheap right now due to the exchange rate. If you were to buy a US version from a shop on this side of the world you'd pay about $350 to $400 depending on where you got it. The Tatula is a nice reel, but it will never be like a Zillion. The Zillion is in an entirely different league. The only thing better is the Steez, which it shares some parts with I might add.
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Same here, I don't even bother looking at the stuff here anymore. It just isn't the same. It's even better that the Japanese get your stuff to you faster than anybody here does, plus they will pay return shipping if you decide to send it back. You can't go wrong.
Exchange rate plus reels being made in Japan has me spoiled. Most my recent purchases have Been direct from Japan, not only getting better build quality, but cheaper price compared to the stuff in the US market.
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do they make that reel in a flipping switch version? what is the lightest most expensive one out there now?
They don't. I think only Lew's makes reels with a flipping switch now. These Daiwas with the SV spool are so controlled you don't need one, you can even skip baits with them.
do they make that reel in a flipping switch version? what is the lightest most expensive one out there now?
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I use both the Daiwa Coastal sv tw 150 and the Daiwa Fuego CT for float fishing for steelhead. This season it has been 50/50 when using my bait casters or my Daiwa SS tournament 1300 spinning reel. I am able to cast 1/32 oz. jigs using an Addicted Mustad weighted float, a small inline sinker, and 1 or two split shots above my leader using the Daiwa coastal. I use 12 lb. solar green Big Game line, which floats really well. My question is what type of floats do you normally use? and what type of weights do you use, when float fishing? I am relatively new to using a bait caster for float fishing, but I seem to have much better line control, especially on longer drifts. My spinning reel is great for shorter drifts and when I fish smaller feeder creeks. I am just wondering if I am using a float that is too heavy, when using my baitcaster that might spook the steelhead? I have learned so much from this forum. Thank You!
Typically, I use a fixed float in the 8g to 11g size rating on smaller rivers. The Addicted floats are really nice for jigs, since they are weighted themselves, it makes it easy for casting, and pretty simple setup to run. The Jig themselves have weight to them so no split shots needed. Here in Michigan, we are allowed to run spawn bags so that's what we use majority of the time(The addicted guys run worm jigs and beads cause that's what they are limited to, no spawn bags allowed for steel).

Having a fixed float gives you the option to stack your weights in different ways. With a weighted float and a couple small split shots, it's hard to control the depth which your bait is at and is most likely running higher in the water column. This means it's possible you're not getting into the meat of the hole.
I generally run a 16-20lb mainline to a 2ft long leader(8-12lb). all along the main line from the float down to the leader I have split shorts to drag the bait down to the bottom of the hole. I run usually 1 or 2 BB weights on my leader line to my hook (picture below does not show the BB weight on the leader). Thats really only to prevent the bait from lifting up from the current of the water.

Slope Rectangle Font Parallel Electric blue
I use both the Daiwa Coastal sv tw 150 and the Daiwa Fuego CT for float fishing for steelhead. This season it has been 50/50 when using my bait casters or my Daiwa SS tournament 1300 spinning reel. I am able to cast 1/32 oz. jigs using an Addicted Mustad weighted float, a small inline sinker, and 1 or two split shots above my leader using the Daiwa coastal. I use 12 lb. solar green Big Game line, which floats really well. My question is what type of floats do you normally use? and what type of weights do you use, when float fishing? I am relatively new to using a bait caster for float fishing, but I seem to have much better line control, especially on longer drifts. My spinning reel is great for shorter drifts and when I fish smaller feeder creeks. I am just wondering if I am using a float that is too heavy, when using my baitcaster that might spook the steelhead? I have learned so much from this forum. Thank You!
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Thanks for the advice and diagram! I live in Ohio, so I mainly use jigs and spawn sacks and beads. I have been using the Great Lakes Steelhead company, deep series 8mm. beads, which are equal to a 3/0 split shot on my leader which helps get the bait/jig in the strike zone faster. I am going to try your suggestions to see if it will increase my catch rate. Have you ever tried using in-line weights.
Just curious, what brand of floats do you use when using your baitcaster? Thanks for the tips!
Oh man, I gotta stop reading this stuff or I will be buying one of those reels. I have to say I still don't understand the concept of a weighted float.
Typically, I use a fixed float in the 8g to 11g size rating on smaller rivers. The Addicted floats are really nice for jigs, since they are weighted themselves, it makes it easy for casting, and pretty simple setup to run. The Jig themselves have weight to them so no split shots needed. Here in Michigan, we are allowed to run spawn bags so that's what we use majority of the time(The addicted guys run worm jigs and beads cause that's what they are limited to, no spawn bags allowed for steel).

Having a fixed float gives you the option to stack your weights in different ways. With a weighted float and a couple small split shots, it's hard to control the depth which your bait is at and is most likely running higher in the water column. This means it's possible you're not getting into the meat of the hole.
I generally run a 16-20lb mainline to a 2ft long leader(8-12lb). all along the main line from the float down to the leader I have split shorts to drag the bait down to the bottom of the hole. I run usually 1 or 2 BB weights on my leader line to my hook (picture below does not show the BB weight on the leader). Thats really only to prevent the bait from lifting up from the current of the water.

View attachment 880142
I'll use inline weights on bigger river systems when it allows for it. Lot of charters run inline weights. It's a lot simpler to manage. For smaller systems i think the shot patterns are a bit nicer.
Thanks for the advice and diagram! I live in Ohio, so I mainly use jigs and spawn sacks and beads. I have been using the Great Lakes Steelhead company, deep series 8mm. beads, which are equal to a 3/0 split shot on my leader which helps get the bait/jig in the strike zone faster. I am going to try your suggestions to see if it will increase my catch rate. Have you ever tried using in-line weights.
Just curious, what brand of floats do you use when using your baitcaster? Thanks for the tips!
Its a weight on the float, makes it easier to cast since you don't have weights on your line under the float. Really only find them useful for running jigs.
Oh man, I gotta stop reading this stuff or I will be buying one of those reels. I have to say I still don't understand the concept of a weighted float.
Typically, I use a fixed float in the 8g to 11g size rating on smaller rivers. The Addicted floats are really nice for jigs, since they are weighted themselves, it makes it easy for casting, and pretty simple setup to run. The Jig themselves have weight to them so no split shots needed. Here in Michigan, we are allowed to run spawn bags so that's what we use majority of the time(The addicted guys run worm jigs and beads cause that's what they are limited to, no spawn bags allowed for steel).

Having a fixed float gives you the option to stack your weights in different ways. With a weighted float and a couple small split shots, it's hard to control the depth which your bait is at and is most likely running higher in the water column. This means it's possible you're not getting into the meat of the hole.
I generally run a 16-20lb mainline to a 2ft long leader(8-12lb). all along the main line from the float down to the leader I have split shorts to drag the bait down to the bottom of the hole. I run usually 1 or 2 BB weights on my leader line to my hook (picture below does not show the BB weight on the leader). Thats really only to prevent the bait from lifting up from the current of the water.

View attachment 880142
I'll use inline weights on bigger river systems when it allows for it. Lot of charters run inline weights. It's a lot simpler to manage. For smaller systems i think the shot patterns are a bit nicer.
I'll use inline weights on bigger river systems when it allows for it. Lot of charters run inline weights. It's a lot simpler to manage. For smaller systems i think the shot patterns are a bit nicer.
Thanks for your help! I"m guessing you use Raven fixed floats the majority of time?
Ravens and blood run. Sometimes bloodrun has a 3 for 1 deal so i stock up then. fixed floats are getting stupid expensive. I usually just buy them in bulk off ebay.
Thanks for your help! I"m guessing you use Raven fixed floats the majority of time?
Been thinking about making some for myself.
Ravens and blood run. Sometimes bloodrun has a 3 for 1 deal so i stock up then. fixed floats are getting stupid expensive. I usually just buy them in bulk off ebay.
A lot of guys do. You get better quality floats by making them yourself. The ravens and bloodruns are pretty cheap quality and don't seem to last. I know some guys put a clear coat over them to help them last longer.
Been thinking about making some for myself.
A side note: The December/January 2023 issue of Great Lakes Angler magazine has a good article on using a baitcaster for steelhead fishing.
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