Michigan Sportsman Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I hear many on here against bait pile hunting, yet are gung-ho about food plots. Could someone please tell me how planting a garden out in the woods is different than dumping some apples? Also, why do bait hunters have to restrict their amounts, yet food plot hunters can hunt over an unrestricted area of plantings?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,621 Posts
I see you're doing a little baiting of your own BB.
The answer to the final jepordy question is:

food plots last the year round, bait runs out
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sorry about the negative connotation, but I would actually like to know the differences ethically. A healthy argument is ok isn't it?? If not, then lock it up...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,116 Posts
This is my experience in the "Great White North". I know that others with baiting experience in the deer abundant regions of the southern farmland area can be entirely different, but then again, most don't rely on bait as the primary method of hunting in those areas, as they do around here.

You hear comments from "time to time" of those claiming food plots are the same as baiting. It only leads me to believe that someone making that claim has never hunted with a food plot, never managed their land with one, maybe doesn't own land, and really has no experience with what they are actually claiming.

1. Food plots need to be a minimum 1/2 acre in size, unless they are considered "harvest plots"-plots hunted over as the deer are on their way to larger, safer, destination plots. Small plots are quickly consumed and offer no further attraction then an empty apple tree. Most have many entrance and exit routes.

Bait piles are a little smaller and concgregat deer to a specific site.

2. Food plots help the wildlife, as well as deer, over an entire year.

Bait piles around my house feed deer for about 2 weeks, on average, with some for 1 week or less, and very few over 3 weeks.

3. Food plots offer up to 40% protein during critical growing periods.

Corn offers 7% protein and can be toxic if consumed in large quantities by starving deer in need of solid forages, solid forages such as the legumes or brassicas that are planted in food plots.

4. Food Plots offer food anytime of the day, most of the year, and do not concentrate deer to a single pile, just before dark, to be quickly consumed. In this way, a food plot is utalized many times a day, for months at a time, greatly increasing the overall health of the animal, including increased lactation rates, improved fawn mortality rates, increased fat reserves, and increased antler growth.

Bait piles, around here, are totally consumed in about 2 weeks, and do nothing more nutritionaly than give the deer a little candy before winter.

5. Due to the fact that food plots are used many times throughout the day, the effects of "overbrowsing" on local habitats is greatly decreased.

Bait piles do not help the local habitat, in fact, they may deplete various areas by conentrating deer to a single spot in the woods.

6. Food plots are more dificult to hunt over, as deer can enter or exit at any time, on many trails, with no need to arrive and quickly consume what's left before the supply is depleted. To be succussful, food plots are best hunted in the trails that lead to and from bedding areas, just like a farm field, acorn crop, or other natural food sources.

Bait piles congregate deer to a specific location, and young, inexperienced deer, particularily yearling bucks, come readily to a bait pile at the end of a 2-track, making them "sitting ducks".

7. It takes a great effort to establish a food plot, with liming, fertalization, and seeding taking a considerable amount of work to complete. A food plot is a year-round maintainance project of "fun-work", with a certain amount of passion and love for the sport needed to carry out the task.

Around here, baiting amounts to stopping by the "Holiday" gas station of the way to checking into a motel or cabin in the area, and then throwing out a bag, or I mean "2 gallons", within walking distance to the ATV, other vehicle, or cabin.

8. Those who have hunted over food plots realize quickly that deer turn nocturnal and it is common to ruin a food plot for daytime use very quickly because deer do not have to visit at any certain time due to the abundace of food.

A bait pile conregates the deer very quickly to a single spot before the "2-gallons" is used up.

9. Most who use food plots are out on their property often througout the entire year, learning woodsmanship, funnels, bedding areas, deer trails, and other traditional hunting methods.

Again, around here baiting is a 2 week thing, with very few hunters in the woods around my property at any other time than the weekend before gun season, and the week of gun season. I find many of the baiters around here, but not all, are "fair-weather hunters", with no real love, passion, or care for the deer or habitat.

10. Food plots do not assist in the spread of disease, such as TB.

Bait piles do.

Also, baiting fosters a reliance on 1 hunting method that has shaped our hunting culture. It's not that baiting is a problem, hunting food plots even, just the RELIANCE of baiting that is the problem. Also, there are always excpetions, but many have reduced their hunting odds by using bait exclusively and over the past couple of decades we have gotten used to mediocrity in our expectations. Many that use bait are just happy to see a buck...while many that don't consistantly take older bucks while using a variety of hunting methods.

Food plots do not shape a hunting culture, in fact, many find that if you have food plots...you shoot your bucks somewhere else. Food plots are no different than ag-land, oak flats, beach ridges, apple orchards or other more "natural" food sources. Deer use them as such and you need to hunt deer as such. Not so with bait piles, when deer are most common to visit during only the last 20 minutes of light.

Block Bud, you have a bunch of "bait-piles" by you in some of the best hunting in the U.P. on small islands surrounded by marshes that have a few oaks on them. Get into those during the best acorn years and you can experience better hunting than bait piles and food plots combined.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,621 Posts
I have no authority to lock it up. There have been many many debates on this in the past. I picked what I feel the most relevant. I North Jeff is responding and I'm sure you'll get some good reading. Personally I plant around 5 acres, that'd be alot of food to carry and dump in a pile. Not to even think about the deer contact with eachother within that area that the pile is located.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,824 Posts
I'll second that.

Let me take the opportunity to thank Jeff for his comments. Surely these comments were thoroughly thought out and well written. I doubt that anyone could have said it better.

btw, we do use food plots here and also dabble with a little bait, but nothing like you see on public land. Also, we've never taken a decent buck over any bait that I can remember but many on those entry trails to the food plots.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,379 Posts
BlockBUD said:
I hear many on here against bait pile hunting, yet are gung-ho about food plots. Could someone please tell me how planting a garden out in the woods is different than dumping some apples? Also, why do bait hunters have to restrict their amounts, yet food plot hunters can hunt over an unrestricted area of plantings?


From the DNR:

What is the Difference Between Baiting and Feeding?

"Baiting" is defined as putting out food materials for deer to attract, lure, or entice them as an aid in hunting. A person baiting deer must comply with the baiting regulations.

“Feeding” is defined as individuals placing food materials out that attract deer or elk for any reason other than baiting. Feeding for recreational viewing purposes must follow regulations for recreational viewing. Supplemental feeding of deer is prohibited with the exception of eight Upper Peninsula counties. For specific regulations, visit the supplemental feeding page.

Food plots, naturally occurring foods, standing agricultural crops, or food that is in place as part of normal farming practices are not considered baiting or feeding.

To answer your second part of the queston - because it is the law.

The end.

Run a search block bud - I'm really not in the mood for this debait [sic] right before Christmas -



ferg....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,379 Posts
BlockBUD said:
Sorry about the negative connotation, but I would actually like to know the differences ethically. A healthy argument is ok isn't it?? If not, then lock it up...
there are NO HEALTHY ARGUMENTS on this subject - do a search and you will see why - no need to visit it again - sorry you were not here to particpate the first nine hundred times we had to close down this very discussion.

ferg....
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top