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http://www.remington.com/magazine/current/2004_0109.asp


Winterizing Your Deer
Deer in Northern habitats fare better in brutal conditions if hunters keep herds in check while providing good cover and self-sustaining foods.
By Patrick Durkin

"If you don’t shoot does and fawns, you’ll soon discover no amount of food-plot and habitat work can keep pace with the herd’s size and appetite."
unters in Northern states who want to help whitetails make it through winter in peak condition should never forget their No. 1 priority is to feed the herd regular servings of well-placed bullets and broadheads each autumn.

That might sound harsh, but wildlife biologists and habitat specialists say doe shooting must be emphasized in Northern deer woods, and it’s nearly impossible to overdo it. When hunters keep whitetail numbers in check, it’s much easier to stay on top of the other vital components of herd management. Those factors include improving thermal cover and natural forage, and maintaining perennial food plots and cold-weather food plots. When those five factors work together, each deer is more likely to attain maximum growth and experience peak health.

Spare the Bullet, Hurt the Herd

“In terms of cost and cost efficiencies, the best thing you can always do for your hunting property is to spend an extra $10 to $15 on bullets,” said Neil Dougherty, a wildlife consultant for North Country Whitetails in upstate New York. Dougherty recommends that once you have enough ammo, find some friends and family members, and shoot all the does you can legally harvest.


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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The opinions on this thread vary as much as the topography, climate and carrying capacity of the land. The UP contains both the highest and lowest deer per square mile in the state. Making one size fits all policies difficult to impossible at best.

I see valid points in everyones posts. They may be a perfect fit for their own area but do they address the situation a township or two over?

I think Durkin and Dougherty hit the nail on the head with this article (nearly perfect fit for me) but I also know it does not apply just a few miles away.

I know where I'm at, I would not want NJ's northern management policies in effect even though we're both within 20 miles of Lake Superior. I need to get rid of many does and he doesn't. Different situations call for different management policies.

If there are no major changes in herd size, due to winter kill, I'll be looking at killing 40% to 50% of the adult doe population next fall but I won't advocate it for townships around me because I think they should choose what's best for their area.

One thing that I do know that works is "habitat improvement" no matter where it takes place.
 
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