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I am new to the state and was wondering if the any rivers contain hellgramites.

Thanks for the help
 

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Someone hurry up and post the shot of Fred Trost getting bit by the hellgramite. I know that someone out there has it. To answer your question, yes there are hellgramites. Someone with more experience will probably give you more information.
 

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pretty easy to find in the chippewa.

Nasty looking little buggers.
:lol:
 

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Scientific name: Corydalus cornutus
Common name: Hellgramite (larvae), Dobson Fly (adult)
November's creature is a hellgramite. As you might have guessed by looking at it, it's a predator--and it's a big one! Hellgramites are usually three-inches long.

This creature is in the insect order Megaloptera. Adult Megalopterans include insects commonly known as fishflies, alderflies and dobsonflies. Larval Megalopterans, specifically those in the family Corydalidae, are known as hellgramites. The species in the genus Corydalus are among our largest North American insects.

Hellgramites are not very common. They are generally found under big rocks in larger, well-aerated streams and rivers. Being large and "showy" insects they tend to be secretive, hiding tightly wedged under large rocks to avoid predation (being eaten by something else).

As they lie under rocks, they feed on pretty much any insect or invertebrate that crawls by. They don't chase creatures that swim by, because they lack the ability to swim strongly in the fast-flowing water environment that they live in. Actually, they don't swim very well in any water.

As you might be able to tell, they have very large pincers. They use these powerful pincers to catch and tear up their prey. When handling these creatures you have to be very careful because they move very fast (it was hard to take their picture!), and can inflict a painful bite (ouch!). They're not poisonous, but they are powerful enough to draw blood. So if you catch one in a stream or see one crawling on land....watch out!!

You've probably never seen one of these creatures, and that's O.K. --they're hard to find. They spend two to four years of their lives in the water living under rocks, like we mentioned above. After spending a few years in a stream they crawl onto land--sometimes several hundred meters from the water--where they pupate. After a week or two they emerge as adults, in much the same way that caterpillars turn into butterflies.

Most people, even those who know about hellgramites, have never seen an adult hellgramite. The adults are known as dobsonflies, because they fly along streams and rivers exclusively at night. They're sometimes attracted to lights, so you might see one flying around a streetlight at night if you're near a stream or river. But don't be afraid, the adults are harmless -- although they are big and look scary!

Class: Insecta
Order: Megaloptera
Family: Corydalidae
Genus: Corydalus
Species: cornutus
 

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ReddHead said:
Someone hurry up and post the shot of Fred Trost getting bit by the hellgramite. I know that someone out there has it. To answer your question, yes there are hellgramites. Someone with more experience will probably give you more information.
That was one of the funniest things I ever saw happen on his show!:lol:
 

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Very nice information Steve. Thanks for the education. I was night fishing for browns one night on the Muskegon River about two years ago when I felt a bunch of fluttering on my chest. I figured it was a big moth so I reached up and gently pinched my finger together over its wings. As soon as I turned on my head lamp I saw this creature about 4 inches long. Luckily I had it's wings in my fingers but it was arching it's back and all I saw were these HUMUNGOUS pinchers waving around trying to get a hold of my hand. If I had know that they were relatively harmless I would have hung on and looked more closely. But since I had never seen an adult dobsonfly before and I saw those pinchers, I (and I hate to admit this) yelled like a little girl and flung the bug away as fast as I could. Afterwards I was thinking it looked pretty cool but when my head lamp first lit that thing up, I just freaked out.

I wonder if the increasing crayfish population in the Muskegon over the past few years has decreased the dobsonfly numbers. After they did that chemical lamprey treatment a few years ago, all of the crayfish seemed to have died. They're making a comeback now.
 

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As kids, we were amature entomologists... collected every kind of insect we could find.. and we used to find them occasionaly in the stream that runs thru my parents property. Decent sized stream that had the occasional salmon wander thru... doesn't freeze over in the winter due to the current. Big ugly things those helgramites! Found them under rocks looking for crawfish for bait.
 

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When Fred trost got bit that was the funniest sh%# I have ever seen, I could not tell you how many times I rewatched that :lol: .. Cya Slick
 

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there small but lol here ya go,




:yikes: :lol: :bash: :evil:
 

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Old thread, but I'll reply.

We found a ton of these in in the river near a picnic area in Hudson Mills Metropark, near Dexter MI.
 

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Here is a great picture of the little beasts;
 

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Yeah if you see what looks like a dragon fly on stereoids it is no doubt a dobson fly. I seen one once and it was creepy, still had its pinchers (more like horns on the fly) and was BIG. I had no idea what that was at the time.
I had to go home and look it up as I never seen one before and never since.
 
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