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I have heard a few stories of Grayling being caught in michigan, particularly near the town that bears the fish's namesake, but just wondering if anyone has seen or even caught a grayling in michigan LP or UP
 

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I read a story somewhere about grayling.It says that they no longer exist and are extinct in Michigan.The only places in the lower 48 that I know of where grayling might exist would be the highest elavations of the western mountain states and maybe perhaps in the upper new england area.I know at one time back in the 80s a small population of grayling could be found in some very remote lakes of eastern arizona.Wether or not they are still there I dont know.I dream and fantasize someday I will get a chance to go somewheres in northern canada and be able to fish for them along with other types of char.:D
 

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They were planted in one of my favorite little trout streams in Antrim county a few years back. I don't know of anyone catching any. Linda G. might be able to give you the scoop on them since she lives close to it.

Bob
 

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Caught some Grayling a few years back outside Jackson Hole Wyoming. Other than that I have never seen any
 

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yes there are grayling in michigan. only a few years back i caught them in the lower penninsula. they are also in a small lake in the u.p. also. i'll note say were thats your work to look at the d.n.r. plantings an you'll find it. good luck an use small dri flys.
 

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how is it that the michigan dnr says they are non existant if they are planting them? I've never heard anything about Grayling being planted anywhere in Michigan, I could be wrong though.
 

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The little river I am talking about had signs posted along it. Not sure what it said. If you are interested in what river this is, shoot me a PM.

Bob
 

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I don't believe there's been any stocking of grayling in Michigan waters since 1984, the year the **** River was planted in Antrim County.

Don't get all excited, tho, I don't know of anyone who's caught anything dimly resembling a grayling from that river since the year after they were planted-1985. I never even got to see one, having just moved up here at the time they were stocked. The following year I looked, tho, and looked hard, as did every other fisherman in northwestern lower Michigan. They just weren't there, apparently eaten by the brown trout and other predators that live in and around the river.

It's possible that some of the excess that were brought from Montana (or where ever it was out west they came from, seems like it was Montana, I'd have to check my notes) were dropped into some of the really remote waters of the UP and may have survived, I wouldn't be surprised. But you can't keep any even if you do find them somewhere.

Seems to me they were also stocked into another body of water in the Lower about 1984, but survival was negatory there as well.

Fishy, I don't think the fish you're thinking of in Arizona are grayling-I think you're thinking about apache trout?

But it might be-at one time, our state fishery agencies were willing to try just about anything anywhere. Not anymore. And that's probably a good thing, although in the case of the grayling, it's sad.
 

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Well the Oncorhynchus Apache was a native trout of the eastern high mountains streams of arizona and western new mexico.the artic graylings were planted up in some of these streams and high mountain lakes as well back long ago around the 1940`s.The apache trout still exist in most of these location due to the native indian fisheries working in coexistance with the arizona dept of wildlife.These trout were once raised and planted in streams that were on indian reservation property.To date Im not sure if this is still being done or not.I do beleive there is a small population of the wild salomo apache trout that still exist in remote mountains streams of eastern arizona and western new mexico if droughts and or destruction of habitat by either natural or unatural causes havent killed them off.As far as the grayling Im not realy sure if a population of them was ever maintained by continued stocking purposes in arizona.I fished for them in some of the lakes they were planted in between Greer and Alpine arizona back in the mid to late 80`s when I used to live there.I was never fortunate enough to catch any of them though.As far as Michigans population of grayling its posible that very small populations exist in very remote locations but the article I read says that the native Michigan population of graylings are extinct.Given the facts that so many other nonative trout inhabit the waters of where these fish once resided and the sensitivity to their enviroment and compition for food and teritory its highly unlikely that many if any survive.The status of my residence here in Michigan being short in duration and the lack of being able to explore the posibility of graylings populations existing I cant say for 100% certanity that there are any survivors from past plantings or native stocks.Im left only to speculate on what may or may not be.Its kinda like the reported sightings of mountain lions in other states and Michigan.Wildlife officials always claim there are none but someone always comes up with evidence that contridicts the officials standings.For example when living in missouri I found and seen tracks of mountain lions,other residence have photographed them in different areas accross the state.So for now Im going to say that despite reports of the Michigan grayling being extinct its posible that they exist but remotely,In closing I would be estatic if someone were to contradict the reports that they are extinct but unfortunately we would all probaly be dreaming if this were to happen.

Link to arizonas grayling fishing
http://www.wmonline.com/gamefish/grayling.htm
 

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Rockr53,

Kneff Lake between Grayling and Rosscommon Is the place you're thing of. Their is a plant of Arctic Grayling in that lake (different strain from the Michigan Grayling wich is now extinct, these are the fish they still have out West). It is a catch and release only fishery for Grayling, and the authorities keep a good eye on you from what I hear. I've never fished this lake, so this is about all I know. Good luck.

Al
 

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I checked out the MI DNR site amd it looks like they did some stocking acros the state, both LP and UP, in the late 80's and early 90's.
 

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There have been reports of 4 grayling caught in Calhoun County. It seems the DNR stocked Red Ears and there was a few grayling with them (thats the only explanation). One of these fish has been mounted although it was only 10"
 

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There was a grayling plant in the mid-late 80's in the Manistee and AuSable Rivers. It was a dismal failure as the wrong strain were planted (western strain of the species). The fry were part of a Turkey trade I believe. The planted fish were about 6" stockings and were dumb as doornails. The would hit anything - even unbaited hooks. They became eagle-osprey and larger fish meals very quickly. Very few survived the first year....none the second.
 

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There is a certain lake in Alger County in the U.P. where the DNR planted grayling for years. We caught them in the early 1990s up to 14". Not sure if they're still in there or not. The lake is a sleeper as you can see it from one of the state highways in the area. It's name is.....I forget....
 

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I have heard some reports of people catching grayling out of Spray Creek but that was some time ago.
 

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hello,
the dnr put a large number of fish into the ausable on the strech of river i grew up on. they were dumb but cool to see. the first hot day they all went belly up. they looked like canidian strain not like the pics ive seen of the natives that disapered years ago. the dnr had much more success raising the fry then they ever anticipated. the fly fishermen that i watched catch them treated them very rough when caught so it is better that the locations of survivers are kept secret. i have caught grayling in other places and they are wonderful fish like a pretty whitfish with a large dorsol fin. hope they do well bringing them back i think there are strains of them in the world that could live in the michigan rivers
thanks chuck
 
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