Michigan-Sportsman.com banner

21 - 35 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,510 Posts
Just a thought... flex seal?? Not sure if it has any use here I personally have never used it but I’ve seen it on tv
Flex seal doesn’t like to stick to thing. It would be peeling up in weeks if it even stuck in the first place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,876 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
Tommrow I’m going to go physically start looking at wood. Can you get wood in larger than a 4foot width? My width of the main deck is 5 ft wide. I’m sure it would cost mired but, than I could possibly get away with less seams in deck. I’ll probably start at home depot than branch out to the local places.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
4 x 8 I believe is the largest you can get. You can cut a scarf joint in the plywood and glue together to make bigger sheets.

Public lumber has marine plywood. I would throw a coat of epoxy on the entire sheet making sure I got the edges. Any screw holes I would predrill and put a squeeze of silicone into them to avoid any water getting to the core that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,876 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
4 x 8 I believe is the largest you can get. You can cut a scarf joint in the plywood and glue together to make bigger sheets.

Public lumber has marine plywood. I would throw a coat of epoxy on the entire sheet making sure I got the edges. Any screw holes I would predrill and put a squeeze of silicone into them to avoid any water getting to the core that way.
That’s a good idea about the silicone in the drill holes


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
4'X12' is the largest marine plywood I have found.

as for sealing screw holes - I have done hundreds of them. Do not use not bath tub caulk, you need a good quality silicone sealant that never hardens. Put a dab of the good silicone into the hole and use the wood end of a cotton swab or small metal pick push the silicone into the hole so the inside is coated completely, put the screw into the tube of silicone so the threads are entirely coated and then put in the hole and screw in until tight.

If you want to finish the wood around the hole after the screw is in the hole and tightened, put tape over the screw hole (or drill the hole through the tape), so after the screw is in place you can wipe up the silicone that has squeezed out of the hole off the tape and then peel up the tape. That will remove all the remaining silicone around the hole. If the silicon gets on the wood it is a nasty mess to remove it so a top coat will stick - the better the silicone used the worse it is to remove.

Hope this helps...
 
  • Like
Reactions: mbirdsley

·
Registered
Joined
·
775 Posts
Just use marine ply. Go to Jamestown distribution, get their brand epoxy , it ships free. Coat all the surfaces, and rivet/screw holes. Second coat on edges and cuts. Then do your tuff coat or you can buy topside marine paint and mix a grit additive to the paint before you put it down. Built a wooden boat like 8 years ago. Sat on a lift 6 month out of the year and it’s fine like that

tony
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,773 Posts
I think I’m going to get the pressure treated ply wood. it is only like on Avg $10 a sheet more for ground contact stuff. I think I’ll prime top, bottom, sides with this stuff



I’ll do the top in the tuff coat and the bottom I’ll pick up a quart of what ever garage floor cement paint at homedepot/hardware store.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
You do know that the treating on the pressure treat ply will eat the aluminum up don't you. Ihave been using 5/8 inch thich sanded sheet grade ply for years and have had no problem. Some that I have done over ten years ago the floor is still solid. I used deck painy on the one I have now over this ply and after the floor was cut to size I layed the ply out in the sum and let it get hot then put the paint to it top side and edges it soaked in as fast as I could apply it. When it quit soaking in I let it dry and flipped it over and did the back side. I think it was 5 ply and was yellow pine which has a lot f piitch in it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,200 Posts
You do know that the treating on the pressure treat ply will eat the aluminum up don't you. Ihave been using 5/8 inch thich sanded sheet grade ply for years and have had no problem. Some that I have done over ten years ago the floor is still solid. I used deck painy on the one I have now over this ply and after the floor was cut to size I layed the ply out in the sum and let it get hot then put the paint to it top side and edges it soaked in as fast as I could apply it. When it quit soaking in I let it dry and flipped it over and did the back side. I think it was 5 ply and was yellow pine which has a lot f piitch in it
Yes.....we have been discussing that already in this thread. You should be fine with pressure treated as long as it is painted on all sides.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,773 Posts
Yes.....we have been discussing that already in this thread. You should be fine with pressure treated as long as it is painted on all sides.
Not really paint wears off after a time. I bought a 14 foot aluminum boat a couple years ago. Transom board was painted and looked good. I noticed after a while the transom looked funny on the outside and then I saw pin holes. I took this board off and it had been painted on the back side but had spots where the the paint rubbed off and it was full of holes. I welded them up and then welded a piece of 1/4 aluminum over all then added a new board. I cut the old one up and then found out it was treated. No idea how long it had been on there. Maybe if a piece light weight rubber or plastic was used that may work
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
211 Posts
This might be nit-picking, but a screw hole through the treated wood into the aluminum will allow the chemicals to migrate from the treated wood to the aluminum with any water that goes through the hole even with a barrier between the wood/aluminum. Sealing the hole around the screw is easy, but with the boat flexing different from the wood and the different thermal expansion properties of the wood and aluminum it is difficult for the seal to remain impervious to water penetration for a long time. Again, probably not an issue for a few years or so, but ????
 
  • Like
Reactions: Doghouse 5

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,773 Posts
This might be nit-picking, but a screw hole through the treated wood into the aluminum will allow the chemicals to migrate from the treated wood to the aluminum with any water that goes through the hole even with a barrier between the wood/aluminum. Sealing the hole around the screw is easy, but with the boat flexing different from the wood and the different thermal expansion properties of the wood and aluminum it is difficult for the seal to remain impervious to water penetration for a long time. Again, probably not an issue for a few years or so, but ????
THAT IS WHY I SAID NOT TO USE TREATED WOOD
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
The summer of 2020 the bunk boards of my 2002 trailer finally needed immediate replacement.

I initially used 2x8' treated lumber, wrapped in outdoor carpeting..... then i read about not using treated lumber.... I picked up a 3/4" sheet of marine plywood... ripped off a 8' long section, affixed it on top of the existing treated wood bunks, and wrapped it also in carpet....

Should it be okay as it is or should that treated lumber be removed????

Note, the treated wood was only in direct contact (wrapped in carpet) with the bottom of the boat for about 60 days before I added the marine plywood on top of it....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,773 Posts
The summer of 2020 the bunk boards of my 2002 trailer finally needed immediate replacement.

I initially used 2x8' treated lumber, wrapped in outdoor carpeting..... then i read about not using treated lumber.... I picked up a 3/4" sheet of marine plywood... ripped off a 8' long section, affixed it on top of the existing treated wood bunks, and wrapped it also in carpet....

Should it be okay as it is or should that treated lumber be removed????

Note, the treated wood was only in direct contact (wrapped in carpet) with the bottom of the boat for about 60 days before I added the marine plywood on top of it....
It may start to seperate. If you went over the treated wood with it when it does go bad go to a plastics place and see if they have some cutoffs of teflon. I bought some years ago for a 5 inch wide strip 12 foot long. I put this on top of my bunk boards on my 14 foot boat and that thing slips off with just a slight push. I counter sunk the screw holes extra deep
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Your ply will rot out at some point... especially with soggy carpet on it. Once the ply turns into beaver puke, it could become a bad “puncture” situation if you’ve got screws sticking up, plus the PT chems corroding your hull.

Bunks are probably the easiest thing to replace boating-wise... I say accept the fact they will need replacing every 10-15 years and be done with it, rather than jump thru hoops with PT. I used regular pine and coated it with linseed-spar formula to make it last a little longer.

You could also spend some $ for cedar 2x8s, should last longer than pine.
 
21 - 35 of 35 Posts
Top