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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Something is fishy about this one isolated case of CWD. Either this deer contacted this disease from a deer outside the fence or maybe this disease can occur naturally without a host animal being the carrier. Or maybe the lab got it wrong and mis-diagnosed this animal, which if that is the case someone is going to have bigggggg lawsuit.
Any research out there suggest this can happen naturally to a deer?
 

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There is at least one other possibility: the paperwork on this deer is wrong or the paperwork on a deer it contacted is wrong. I have no personal knowledge about the facility, etc. So I am certainly not implying that any involved here did anything wrong. Given the high dollar value of some animals there is incentive to cheat. Importing deer from other states has been banned. So what if you hear about some great specimen in another state that would be just what you want for your operation? Who's going to be pulling over an enclosed trailer on the interstate in the middle of the night? This new deer gets the paperwork of the old deer and the old deer goes bye-bye. The new deer may be asymptomatic but spread the disease to another animal that is then transported (legally) within Michigan. The newly infected deer ends up in Kent county without any knowledge by the operator that his new deer has been exposed. As one individual with experience told me, to paraphrase: 'you wouldn't be able to sleep if you knew what was happening at night"

Let me emphasize, I don't know anything about any of the facilities involved in the current incident. I also note the DNR has not said there have been any violations by any of the facilities. But all it takes is one facility to let the genie out of the bottle. The fact that 99.99% of the others complied won't change that.
 

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Like people (CJD), deer can simply get CWD. It is naturally occuring (albeit rare) it just happens some times and it won't matter if the deer is wild or captive.
 

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Can this be true or is it just another theory, "Isolated cases" of bovine TB, CAN WE PRETEND THEY "JUST HAPPENED" ?
THERE ARE MORE CREDIBLE EXPLANATIONS.
Could be transmitted by infected feed.
Then there was the bull from Canada. A most interesting phenomenon
May19,2004.
"Results of a Michigan investigation for BOVINE TB- CASE #278744
In FEBRUARY 2004 a case of suspected bovine tuberculosis was reported by USDA's National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) BASED ON POSITIVE CULTURE RESULTS FROM LESIONS RESEMBLING TB FROM A BULL DURING REGULAR SLAUGHTER INSPECTION. STANDARD BIOCHEMICAL TESTING TECHNIQUES INDICATED THAT THE CULTURE ISOLATE WAS Mycobacterium bovis.
This bull came from a small beef herd in Barry county,Mi. TB testing of this herd - no TB infection.THE BULL CAME FROM A BEEF HERD IN Ontario, Canada, MAY,2002. TB Testing of 369 cattle in the Canadian herd SHOWED NO EVIDENCE OF INFECTION
As a result of negative testing of epidemiologically linked herds further investigation of the original ? bacteriological isolate was conducted at NVSL and other cooperating laboratories to reconfirm that the isolate was truly Mycobacterium bovis. THE original ? SAMPLE WAS REPROCESSED AND IT DID NOT RESULT IN THE ISOLATION OF ANY MYCOBACTERIAL SPECIES !! RESULTS OF OTHER ANALYSES INDICATED NO ACID FAST ORGANISMS WERE PRESENT AND THAT THE SAMPLES WERE FROM THE SAME ANIMAL? Testing of the original isolate revealed that it more closely resembled strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex rather than Mycobacterium bovis.
Based on these results, a corrected report was sent on May 17,2004 with a diagnosis of "no isolation made" and that further lab analyses indicate that M. bovis was not the cause of suspicious lesions seen in the bull during slaughter inspection
 

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Like people (CJD), deer can simply get CWD. It is naturally occuring (albeit rare) it just happens some times and it won't matter if the deer is wild or captive.

This is the way I understand it too. It can just happen, as in one report they used the word Spontanious. Well if that is the case how in [email protected]@ do you stop it? No baiting ban is going to help. If deer being congegated in smaller areas has anything to do with it than outlaw all high fenced operations now and outlaw all the habitat improvements being done on private land. As has been posted here several guys do the habitat improvements to draw and hold more deer on their property and this over population could very well be causing a problem. If the deer were dispersed over a larger area they are not as likely to be steping in urin or siliva from other deer it may just help in not spreading a disease. At this poin everyone better be concerned about the heard and not just their little piece of heaven or there may be nothing left for anyone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
For those of you who have stated that cwd can happen naturally in the wild without a host do you have any links as to where you found that information.
 

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Well the lab didnt get the test wrong, it was sent to the national lab in Aimes, Iowa for a second run and it was for sure positive. My guess is the deer was imported from a CWD contaminated state to this deer farm where it was found. Regardless it was found here in michigan and scientist dont fully understand CWD or any prion related disease and there is no treatment if you contract the disease. So ask yourself do you want to be ignorant and think the DNR should just blow this off? I think not it should be monitored to make sure it doesnt exist in our wild deer herd. I know there is no linkage between eating CWD contaminated meat and contracting a prion related disease such as CJD but I wouldnt take the chance if I knew the meat was positive would you?
 

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Well the lab didnt get the test wrong, it was sent to the national lab in Aimes, Iowa for a second run and it was for sure positive. My guess is the deer was imported from a CWD contaminated state to this deer farm where it was found. Regardless it was found here in michigan and scientist dont fully understand CWD or any prion related disease and there is no treatment if you contract the disease. So ask yourself do you want to be ignorant and think the DNR should just blow this off? I think not it should be monitored to make sure it doesnt exist in our wild deer herd. I know there is no linkage between eating CWD contaminated meat and contracting a prion related disease such as CJD but I wouldnt take the chance if I knew the meat was positive would you?

Kentucky DNR captured and transported several Elk from within 25 miles of a known CWD positive area when they did their reintroduction program.

Apparently Ky's DNR isn't to concerend with CWD, or is it that the all mighty dollar takes presedence over common sense. :confused:
 

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USDA AND COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY RESEARCHERS DEVELOP FIRST LIVE TEST FOR CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE IN ELK

FORT COLLINS, Colo., May 30, 2008--Researchers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and Colorado State University (CSU) recently completed their third year of evaluating and validating the first live rectal-tissue biopsy method for detecting chronic wasting disease (CWD) in captive and wild elk.

To date, researchers have collected over 1,500 biopsies from captive elk in Colorado and used the technique to find 15 elk that were positive for CWD. As compared to proven post-mortem diagnostic tests, this live test appears to be nearly as accurate.

“The key advantage to the rectal biopsy test is that it can be performed on live animals. Until now, there was no practical live test for CWD in elk,” said research wildlife biologist Dr. Kurt VerCauteren with APHIS’ Wildlife Services (WS) National Wildlife Research Center (NWRC). “With this technique we can detect CWD in animals not showing any signs of the disease and, thus, remove them so they are not left to infect other individuals and further contaminate the environment.”

The research is a collaborative effort between APHIS’ WS and Veterinary Services programs, the Agricultural Research Service, and the Colorado State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory within the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

The majority of the research was conducted on the Velvet Ridge Elk Ranch, owned by Dennis and Stephanie White, near Fort Collins, Colo. In 2002, an elk on the ranch was confirmed to have CWD and since that time the Whites have worked closely with NWRC and other collaborators to learn more about CWD and to develop methods to manage it in captive and wild settings.

“The use of this new live test in the initial screening, surveillance and monitoring of CWD will greatly aid in the management and control of the disease in the wild, as well as in captive settings,” said VerCauteren.

CWD is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy whereby abnormal proteins accumulate in the central nervous and lymphatic systems of infected animals causing a degenerative lack of control and a “wasting-away” death. Currently, there is no cure for CWD.

CWD has been reported in captive and free-ranging mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk and moose. CWD has been a devastating disease to the captive elk industry. An estimated 12,000-14,000 captive elk have been killed in the western United States and Canada in the past 7-8 years to control CWD. Several thousand free-ranging mule deer, white-tailed deer and elk also have been killed in attempts to reduce the disease in the wild.

The NWRC is the research arm of USDA’s WS program. It is the federal institution devoted to resolving problems caused by the interaction of wild animals and society. The center applies scientific expertise to the development of practical methods to resolve these problems and to maintain the quality of the environments shared with wildlife.
 

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One in 10 RMNP elk have wasting disease
Publish Date: 4/10/2008

The Reporter-Herald

More than one in 10 elk in eastern Rocky Mountain National Park could have chronic wasting disease, a study from park officials concludes.

In testing performed by National Park Service staff members from January to March, 13 of the 117 tests for the disease came back positive.

It was the first time that free-ranging elk had been tested using a live procedure. Before, elk had to be killed before veterinarians could determine whether the animals had the disease.

The 13 elk that tested positive with the live test were euthanized, and necropsies confirmed the diagnoses.

Rocky Mountain National Park spokeswoman Kyle Patterson said researchers were not surprised at the results because the elk herds in the eastern part of the park and the Estes Valley are more densely packed and travel less than others in the wild.

It is those densely packed herds that have led park officials to institute a policy of limited hunting in the next few years. At the same time that Park Service employees are reducing the herd, they will be doing more research on testing methods for chronic wasting disease.

The disease, believed to be caused by misshapen proteins in the nervous system, attacks the brains of the animals and always is fatal. There are no verified cases of the disease being transferred from elk to humans, according to the Chronic Wasting Disease Alliance.

A test for live deer is available, but the test for live elk is still under development.

“Until now, the disease could only be reliably diagnosed after death in elk,” Patterson said in a release.

The initial results of the testing were released Tuesday to participants of a conference at the park and made available to the public on Wednesday.
 
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