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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, Im new to the Michigan Forum and was jsut wondering if anyone had any Llews up here. Im from the Buckeye State lol and love bird dogs and talking about them.
 

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Yep - got one up in the Keweenaw. Moved up here a few years, love dogs and decided to get into bird hunting. She's two, pretty well trained, and I'm looking forward to 9/20. That will be one week after the Bucks claim the top spot in all the polls (guess where I too am from!).
 

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Yep...me too. She's my first setter and 7 months old now. Actually got her from a breeder/grouse hunter from Ohio. (I really need to update my avatar!)
 

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OK help me out here.......what is the differance between a field bred English setter and a Llewellin?

"Field-bred English Setters are often mistakably referred to as "Llewellin", but only DNA can tell the difference." I found this on wika. If this is ture where do you get the dna work done?
 

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OK help me out here.......what is the differance between a field bred English setter and a Llewellin?

"Field-bred English Setters are often mistakably referred to as "Llewellin", but only DNA can tell the difference." I found this on wika. If this is ture where do you get the dna work done?
It's a long story and hotly debated topic. Here are a few links to get you started. As far as where to get DNA testing done, I can't help you there.

If you wanted to start a really cool fight, just say Llewellins are just another Setter. That's usually all it takes. Go ahead and say it...I dare you. :evilsmile

Enjoy the reading.

http://www.nalba.org/llewellin_setters.htm
http://www.drummersglen.com/historyofthesetter.html
 

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It's a long story and hotly debated topic. Here are a few links to get you started. As far as where to get DNA testing done, I can't help you there.

If you wanted to start a really cool fight, just say Llewellins are just another Setter. That's usually all it takes. Go ahead and say it...I dare you. :evilsmile

Enjoy the reading.

http://www.nalba.org/llewellin_setters.htm
http://www.drummersglen.com/historyofthesetter.html

I was actually going to say that "with a name like Llwellin they should be called Welsh Setters not English Setters" ;)

After reading both articles it would appear that all/most English setters are Llewellins just some are more Llewellin than others.
 

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I was actually going to say that "with a name like Llwellin they should be called Welsh Setters not English Setters" ;)

After reading both articles it would appear that all/most English setters are Llewellins just some are more Llewellin than others.
OMG!!! Now you did it. You're in trouble now. I was only kidding about saying something bad about Llewellins. Wait till everyone sees this. You just started WWIII.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yep...me too. She's my first setter and 7 months old now. Actually got her from a breeder/grouse hunter from Ohio. (I really need to update my avatar!)

Birddog is your dog out of Nimisilia Creek Kennels?? And Im not even going to start this arguement about Llewellins and Eng. There different thats all there is too it. Diff blood is diff blood its that simple. And going about a DNA test contanct the Field Dog Stud Book, they will send you a kit.
 

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Birddog is your dog out of Nimisilia Creek Kennels?? And Im not even going to start this arguement about Llewellins and Eng. There different thats all there is too it. Diff blood is diff blood its that simple. And going about a DNA test contanct the Field Dog Stud Book, they will send you a kit.
I'm not trying to start an arguement.....just hoping that someone could tell me in simple terms what the differance is........
 

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This sums it up pretty well...

English Setter:

Elegance, grace, beauty in motion...the true calendar dog. All terms that can be used to describe the English Setter. Nothing has come to epitomize fall in the uplands in our minds like the image so often captured in sporting prints of the English Setter on a statuesque point, whether it be along a run-down stone wall in New England or over quail on a Southern plantation. They are often called the fireside dog as well for their ability to turn off the engine and become a quiet, affectionate member of the household, recovering in front of the fire after a day in the field while the weary hunter sips a single malt and catches up on the day's news.

O.K...so maybe I'm romanticizing just a bit. But anyone who has spent time with this breed knows that much of the lore is, in fact, true. This is a dog that comes in many shapes and sizes, ranging from little fleet of foot bitches weighing in under 30 pounds up to the lumbering grouse dogs topping the scales at over 70 pounds. There is also a split in the registry of these dogs with a majority of the hunting dogs being registered through the Field Dog Stud Book and the show dogs and fewer hunting dogs registered through the AKC.
No matter which style of English you choose, the basics are the same. This is an elegantly put together dog from tip of nose to plume of tail. With a soft flowing coat with just enough feathering to add to the "floating through cover" appearance. The English is an athletic looking dog, muscular and gracefully built, allowing for stamina and strength to endure days afield...truly an upland specialist.

Personality is also a definite plus in this breed. An almost overly affectionate dog that needs interaction on a daily basis, the breed does come with a price: they are not an overly healthy breed nor are they long-lived. They are predisposed to cancers (especially mammary tumors), allergies, hip dysplasia and more.

The English Setter is another breed that is near and dear to my heart. They may not have the versatility of a German dog, nor the dominance of the field trial world of the Pointer, but what they lack on these fronts, they more than make up for in beauty, grace and efficiency in the field and an overwhelming affectionate personality at home.

Llewellin Setter

Some may argue that the Llewellin is just an English Setter, and they would be right. They are, however, a pure strain of English Setter and registered as a separate group with the Field Dog Stud Book Registry. The bloodlines of a Llewellin-registered setter can be traced back to the breeding program of R.L. Purcell Llewellin in the nineteenth century.

Essentially the description of the English Setter would fit for the Llewellin. Because of the dominance of the line in the early part of the last century, it has earned a place of distinction in the field dog world. It is permitted to breed a registered Llewellin to a registered English, but the litter would be registered as English Setters with no distinction towards the Llewellin.

Source: http://www.gundogdoc.com/library/breedsindex.html

Other links of interest:

http://www.esaa.com/
http://www.esaa.com/health.html
http://www.esaa.com/rescue.html

http://www.llewellinsetterclub.com/
http://www.llewellinsetter.net/

http://www.akc.org/breeds/english_setter/index.cfm

http://www.americanfield.com/
 

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So it's kind of like Llews are "buckeyes" and ES are "nuts" ... a "Buckeye" is a NUT, but not all "NUTS" are "buckeyes".

My loyalties lie much further north than Columbus.:)
 

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Buckeye: A tough nut to crack.

Bravery: Watching the OSU/UM game for 6 years running in a redneck bar on the UP while wearing OSU clothing - without any friends present.


Days since Michigan’s last victory over Ohio State in football: 1732
 

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It's one thing to play for a team and lose, another to root for a team and they lose. I don't get too much caught up in the hype, because as you mentioned before, I would have been very depressed for the last 1732 days, which doesn't even take into account this year. Regardless, I still have two favorite teams: Michigan and whoever plays OSU.:)
 

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Birddog is your dog out of Nimisilia Creek Kennels?? And Im not even going to start this arguement about Llewellins and Eng. There different thats all there is too it. Diff blood is diff blood its that simple. And going about a DNA test contanct the Field Dog Stud Book, they will send you a kit.
Wow! You are right. How did you get that? The owners, David and Kristine were just great. They own the dam, the sire was out of Laurel Mountian Llewellins in Pennsylvania.
So far we're very happy with her....very sweet. Time will tell with the bird hunting part.:)
 

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This sums it up pretty well...

English Setter:

Elegance, grace, beauty in motion...the true calendar dog. All terms that can be used to describe the English Setter. Nothing has come to epitomize fall in the uplands in our minds like the image so often captured in sporting prints of the English Setter on a statuesque point, whether it be along a run-down stone wall in New England or over quail on a Southern plantation. They are often called the fireside dog as well for their ability to turn off the engine and become a quiet, affectionate member of the household, recovering in front of the fire after a day in the field while the weary hunter sips a single malt and catches up on the day's news.

O.K...so maybe I'm romanticizing just a bit. But anyone who has spent time with this breed knows that much of the lore is, in fact, true. This is a dog that comes in many shapes and sizes, ranging from little fleet of foot bitches weighing in under 30 pounds up to the lumbering grouse dogs topping the scales at over 70 pounds. There is also a split in the registry of these dogs with a majority of the hunting dogs being registered through the Field Dog Stud Book and the show dogs and fewer hunting dogs registered through the AKC.
No matter which style of English you choose, the basics are the same. This is an elegantly put together dog from tip of nose to plume of tail. With a soft flowing coat with just enough feathering to add to the "floating through cover" appearance. The English is an athletic looking dog, muscular and gracefully built, allowing for stamina and strength to endure days afield...truly an upland specialist.

Personality is also a definite plus in this breed. An almost overly affectionate dog that needs interaction on a daily basis, the breed does come with a price: they are not an overly healthy breed nor are they long-lived. They are predisposed to cancers (especially mammary tumors), allergies, hip dysplasia and more.

The English Setter is another breed that is near and dear to my heart. They may not have the versatility of a German dog, nor the dominance of the field trial world of the Pointer, but what they lack on these fronts, they more than make up for in beauty, grace and efficiency in the field and an overwhelming affectionate personality at home.

Llewellin Setter

Some may argue that the Llewellin is just an English Setter, and they would be right. They are, however, a pure strain of English Setter and registered as a separate group with the Field Dog Stud Book Registry. The bloodlines of a Llewellin-registered setter can be traced back to the breeding program of R.L. Purcell Llewellin in the nineteenth century.

Essentially the description of the English Setter would fit for the Llewellin. Because of the dominance of the line in the early part of the last century, it has earned a place of distinction in the field dog world. It is permitted to breed a registered Llewellin to a registered English, but the litter would be registered as English Setters with no distinction towards the Llewellin.

Source: http://www.gundogdoc.com/library/breedsindex.html

Other links of interest:

http://www.esaa.com/
http://www.esaa.com/health.html
http://www.esaa.com/rescue.html

http://www.llewellinsetterclub.com/
http://www.llewellinsetter.net/

http://www.akc.org/breeds/english_setter/index.cfm

http://www.americanfield.com/

Best explaination yet.......thanks
 
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