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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here are a couple of photos of a foodplot that we installed on a friend of mine's place.

This was tilled out of an overgrown field with lots of weeds and saplings in very poor soil. The ground at one time was used as a blueberry farm so it has acid soil. We had no soil test, but trust me, it is really bad soil.

End of July. NO SPRAYING - Over waist high weeds and saplings everywhere. See ground around the plot, it all looked like a home for woodcock and grouse when we started.

End of July - We trailered my 39 horse Farmtrac to the site and with the tiller set on deepest depth. We tilled the weeds, sapplings and all. Made two passes through to grind and bury the vegetation, and weed seeds as deep as possible. Horseshoe pulled out the rototilled trees as I went over them.

This plot has several sections and includes several sets of trails between sections. We left some bushes for cover to provide security. It is a killing plot.

Then spread 320 lbs of Nutrilime quick release lime (love this stuff as it works fast!).

Then spread 2 - 50# bags of 19-19-19

Then spread 50#s of RR soybeans and 30#s of Canadian winter peas.

Late August - Horsehoe (the plot owner) spread 50#s of winter wheat by hand over the plot - soys and peas were coming up but getting hit hard by the deer. Can you say Milogranite???? We didn't, but will be able to say it in our sleep next year to keep the deer out.

Sept 7th - Horsehoe spread 100#s of winter wheat and 6 lbs of dwarf essex rape over the entire plot and trails.

These photos were taken today on the plot while he was hunting with his son.

Notice the picture of the browsing cage next to his son. The Canadian peas would of been over shoulder height had they not been browsed so heavily. See peas and soys in the cage in the photo next to his son.

The dwarf essex rape and winter wheat is doing great and now with so much forage growing the soys and peas are starting to make a come back.

This is 1/4 acre plot with 150#s of winter wheat, 50#s of soybeans, 30 lbs of Canadian winter peas and 6 lbs of dwarf essex rape used. This is also why I am a fan of "overseeding" when soils are not well prepared. The effect of the low PH and high amount of weed seed, was offset with a very extreme planting rate of seed.



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The rape is also coming on very strong and will provide good nutrition this coming late season and winter. It is establishing its roots now and has been near 100% a germination success, and will shoot up strong in the coming weeks.

Although they (Horseshoe and his son) were unsuccessful in harvesting a deer while hunting here this weekend, some good memories were made and there will be more memories to come this season after the frosts start to hit.

Incidently, they left at 7:45 PM last night to head back to the truck and accordingly, they got a camera shot of 4 does in the plot at 7:49, 4 minutes after leaving last night.

Poor soil, poor preparation of soil, yet a strong foundation of a plot that will be a great building block for the future.
 

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That looks like GREAT surrounding cover! You bush hogged it before tilling didn't ya??? Good lookin' plot. I was wondering...how much does milogranite run?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No - we did not brush hog it before tilling. Put in the ear plugs, cranked up the Farmtrac to full power, and let the tiller do the work! Heavy weeds and brush all mixed into powder soil. Amazing what you can do with a powerful tiller that has an aggressive tine structure.

The soys and peas never really got over 8" before they were nipped off an eaten.

I have never used Milogranite so do not know what it cost, but I would imagine is a relatively cheap compared to fertilizer.
 

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koz bow...that's amazing, I would've thought your tiller would just get all bound up with weeds/brush. I love my kuhn, but I would have real doubts about tackling that task without knocking everything down first.

Falk...thanks for the info, I assume that price is for a 50lb bag?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
koz bow...that's amazing, I would've thought your tiller would just get all bound up with weeds/brush. I love my kuhn, but I would have real doubts about tackling that task without knocking everything down first.

Falk...thanks for the info, I assume that price is for a 50lb bag?
I think they sell it in 40# bags, at least when I used to work at a nursery in Grand Rapids many moons ago.

For some reason, my tiller only gets some brush occassionally wrapped up on the outside edges and not enough that it slows it down. It spits the trees right out the back. I have never had to stop and clean it out.

I have done several plots this way already this year, and it is a tilling machine. The tiller is 74" wide as well, and I was worried that the 39 horse would drive it well, and it is not an issue. Horsehoe just walked behind and pulled up the bigger trees that did not get tilled to shreds or tilled under, on the 2nd pass.

Next year I am adding a smaller cooler and beverage holder, to make it an even more enjoyable experience!:lol:
 

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Next year I am adding a smaller cooler and beverage holder, to make it an even more enjoyable experience!:lol:

That's funny...that's on my agenda too!
 

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Kozbow, what kind of tiller do you have and how big were the saplings you were able to shred?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Kozbow, what kind of tiller do you have and how big were the saplings you were able to shred?
I have a FARM MAXX 74" tiller made by Unifarm Machinery Corporation.

Model FTH74

This tiller is rated for 30 to 50 HP and I use a 39 HP FarmTrac to drive it. The key is that it is a 9 flange tiller but has 54 blades in total where a standard tiller of this width would only have 36 blades. The blades are also set with an aggressive bite.

I can easily chew through 2" diameter sapplings and will readily take 3" sapplings down but not totally chew them up. The tractor barely sweats in the process.

If I were hunting your land, and had never been there before and wanted to shoot a big buck, I would choose F9 first, and H13 as a secondary location. I would be there on November 2nd through 8th, and would plan on not seeing a "big buck" until after 10:00 PM in the morning. He would be chasing does that are coming out of the bedding area on the west end of the property, and I would at all costs stay out of that area. I would get out of the stand at 1 PM. Good luck. Koz
 
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