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This was taken from the Birminham News Online.

I just found it interesting.....


Fishing surpasses basketball as No. 1 for eye injuries
Sunday, April 22, 2007
MIKE BOLTON
News staff writer
Tuskegee student Ralph Squire had forked out five bucks for the fishing lure that very morning. When the crankbait became entangled in a bush while he fished later that day, it was only natural that he wanted it back.

That decision will haunt him forever.

"I had just bought the lure at the Wal-Mart at Auburn and right off the bat I threw it up in a bush," the Texas native remembers of the incident last May. "I kept pulling on it with the fishing line, trying to pull it loose from the bush."

The lure eventually came loose and struck Squire in the face. When several of his friends rushed to his side to see if he was OK, they made a gruesome discovery. A treble hook from the lure was buried deep in Squire's right eyeball.

Squire became another of an ever-growing number of anglers who have suffered catastrophic eye injuries from fishing lures, according to Birmingham surgeons Dr. Robert Morris and Dr. Douglas Witherspoon of the Callahan Eye Foundation at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

The two surgeons can offer no reason for the increase in eye injuries from fishing, but they have hard data to back up their beliefs that such injuries are on the rise.

More than in basketball:

%%head%%

Since 1982, emergency rooms and clinics across the nation have reported all eye injuries to a U.S. Eye Injury Registry at the Birmingham-based Helen Keller Foundation. Two years ago, eye injuries from fishing surpassed eye injuries from basketball as the No. 1 sports-related eye injury, the doctors say.

"Basketball has always produced the most eye injuries because of elbows and fingers," Morris said. "Racquet sports like racquetball and squash were next. Fishing injuries to the eye have now surpassed them all."

The two doctors say eye injuries from fishing have now reached such a level that they are urging the fishing industry to get the word out about the dangers. The Helen Keller Foundation is working with Bass Pro Shops to create ads warning fishermen not to pull on lures that get hung up in debris.

For Squire, any such warning comes too late.

"The worst part was that I was wearing sunglasses and I tilted them up so I could see better," he said. "I gave the lure a big pull and it came loose and like a bullet it hit me in the face.

"It knocked me down, but I only felt the pain of the lure hitting me. When I stood up I could hear the lure rattling in front of my face and I knew it was bad. My friends came over and saw what I had done and they freaked out."

Squire's friends rushed him to a hospital in Opelika where he was sedated. He then was put aboard a helicopter and airlifted to Birmingham.

The injury was gruesome, but nothing the two surgeons at the UAB Callahan Eye Foundation hadn't seen before. The surgeons carefully cut off the barbs of the treble hook and removed it. Three surgeries later, Squire can see light, colors and movement through the eye.

"It's about like looking through an empty Gatorade bottle," Squire said almost a year after the injury. "I can see people's faces and hands when they are close, but everything far away is just a blur." Souvenir lure %%ehead%% %%bodybegin%%%%head%%

Squire eventually will have surgery to replace the lens in the eye. That should allow the eye to work well, Morris said.

Squire had the lure bronzed and it now sits on his dresser as a reminder of his mistake.

"My answer to anyone wanting to know how to get a lure loose is to just cut the line and leave it," he said. "There's no lure worth what I've gone through."

Data from the Helen Keller Foundation show that nationwide, fishing injuries now make up about 9 percent of all sports eye injuries, Witherspoon said. A hook to the eye makes up about 38 percent of those injuries, while 44 percent come from a sinker or the body of a lure striking an eye.

"People tend to think that a weight or sinker in the eye isn't as bad as a hook in the eye, but it can be just as bad," Morris said. "In a lot of cases the eyeball ruptures. In about half those cases the person is left permanently blind in that eye."

Morris said he is at a loss to explain the surge of eye injuries from fishing in recent years, but he does know that fishing glasses and ball caps that can grab a lure before it reaches the face would substantially decrease such injuries.
 

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i was with a guide (now read: fly fishing, but hey) and he wore safety glasses or sun glasses the entire time.... makes sense, i always wear sunglasses, but on cloudy days i didn't wear any type of glasses, but I am starting to do the same as the guide.
 

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I have seen some pretty gruesome impalings with snagging set-ups. I almost always wear glasses when river fishing. I also know how to pull and either snap a hook/fly/lure off, or pull it loose, without having it blind me on the return. I am paranoid about having a lead weight hit any of my IMX rods.
 

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Woods and Water Rat
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Shutter to think of an eyeball injury :yikes: . I had a near miss once, snagged a jig in the river, had my eye on the line where it went in and as I pulled it free it rocketed out of the water but I saw it coming and caught it with my hand about a foot away from my face. Lesson learned there, keep it low.
 

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And that is one reason I close my eyes when trying to get my line out of trees. Also, why I turn and bury my face when my son casts.
 

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I've recently been emailed pics of a guy with a treble in his eye...and that alone has reinforced my desire to wear sunglasses at all times when fishing...

Of course, this warrants buying a pair that are clear for low-light, but I don't want to lose an eye.

Yikes...
 

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I had one close call and now I wear sun glasses. On darker days I where clear safety glasses. You can get a pair of tinted or clear safety glasses for around 3 dollars and it is well worth the investment to have a few of both. Also, try not to set the hook or jerk on a snag with the rod pointing at your face, or anyone elses for that matter.
 

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I remember a time in the 80's. We were pulling our boat out of ludington, and there was this other boat there with two guys just sitting in it tied up at the boat launch.

I asked them what they were doing, as they were kind of tying up the boat ramp a bit. The one guy replied that one of the guys fishing with them took a J-plug to the nose and eyebrow as they were netting a King. So they came in to take him to the hosipital. They were waiting for the guy that got hooked, and the captain to return so they could all go back out.
 
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