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I have asked just shy of twenty farmers to goose hunt their fields, and I always get a no. I am young, in college, so I am sure that does not help. Any advice on how to won over the farmers?
 

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My advice is to just keep at it!
You will get permission.
Do they have people hunting it already, or is it just a "no".
either way just keep at it.
Good luck!


Duckman39
 

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I found my success rate with getting permission got better with age. I hate to say it and it may not be true at all, but if you look like a young punk college kid i dont think it helps with some farmers.
 

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I found my success rate with getting permission got better with age. I hate to say it and it may not be true at all, but if you look like a young punk college kid i dont think it helps with some farmers.
Yep. I'm glad I look old for being 24. I try to look as old as possible. Grow out some facial hair (if you can:p)Don't wear camo up to the house. If you have long hair, GET A HAIR CUT YA HIPPIE! Dress nice and be polite, its like a mini-job interview. Works for me.
 

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I offer birds and or fish that I have extras of. Some farmers I know love to eat wild game and or fish but don't always have time to head out and get it on their own and will gladly allow access to their land for a lil tasty treat! LOL!:lol:
 

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The true trick is to be a local. They are much more willing to give permission to a local farm boy then an out of town city slicker ;). Other then what u can gather from that be courteous and thank them for their time even if they say no.
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some simple rules that might help your chances-

the don'ts:

never pull a farmer off his equipment to do you the favor of listening to your story. THEY'RE WORKING HERE FOR CRIPES SAKES! time is money right now!

Dont drive out into his field to meet him

don't pull them from the dinner table

Don't bother them during milking

and don't bug them when they're repairing equipment. (they'll be sour for sure. idle machinery = no money/lost revenue)

and as others have said, think of it a bit as a interview or that you're visiting your grandparents. Farmers are busy people and extremely prideful. That's hallowed ground your standing on that's been probably passed on from generation to generation. They're the kings of their domain. show them the utmost respect.
so with that said, I wouldn't be wearing my favorite head banger concert tee and I'd remove all my piercings you whipper snappers are into nowadays! :p (especially that stupid lip ring thing - i see that and I want to help remove the hook from your face!) :lol:
 

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I understand your dilema, we spoke with the PM. Money talks around here for leasing fields. Those that don't lease usually have some shirt tail relative hunting deer and save it for them. It is tough, I asked well over 50 and got no. Calhoun county is pretty tied up, so you may want to expand into the next county. Sadly I say that. Should I find a good field and can get permission to have more than my Dad, nephew and self I will let you know.
 

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the leasing is ruining the game of asking for permission in my opinion and I have given up on it and just concentrate on finding little known public areas and scouting them out. I dont like giving up but I also dont beg and I have found it easier to just say to heck with the farmers and get on with my hunting.
 

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i am also a college kid and get shot down alot on permission for fields. The things i have learned is turn down your radio when your pulling into a driveway. Wear something that you would work in. Not trashed chlothes but you dont want to look like a city slicker. It never hurts to have a little mud on your boots. When you do get permission treat the fields with respect and dont trash them. Word of mouth goes a long ways. always ask if they have a friend or know someone who might have an open field. Also make up buisness cards and leave them with the Farmer who knows if their going to change thier mind. I'd say my friends and I combined have about a 1/30 success rate. dont get discouraged
 

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Im batting about 50% out here in alberta.. If i get a "no" i move along..

If i get in, and have a shoot and watch the birds move down the road.. I go knock on that door and say I was hunting over at "Jim and Brendas" and watched all the birds move down into the wheat field you own at such and such location(make sure you know who owns the field and what crop is in it,, before asking the "do you own this field?",, do the homework first!)

When you get a good spot make sure the farmer knows you appreciate it! Case of beer, some jerky,, a gift cetificate for the farm supply store,,, and dont forget the wife!!! a gift certificate for a real good dinner works wonders... I also brought back cases of homemade canned peaches and jams that I give to them! They cant get it here,, they appreciate something a lil different that the whole family can enjoy!

About a week and a half ago,, I got on a farm thats holding huge huge numbers of puddlers,, im talking 10's of thousands of birds.. Ive shot it 5 times in 10 days. The farmer knows the day before Im going to be hunting it,, and where im going to be hunting.. And I always stop by after the hunt to thank him.. hes sick of seeing me,, and now laughs and says just kill the damn things!

Hes recieved a couple gifts from myself and buddies already.. Tomorrow hes getting a couple tix to a calgary flames game and a voucher to fill his fuel tank in his truck.. I gaurantee ill be able too hunt this property for as long as he owns it,, and since he is 28,, i hoping that will be a long long time!
 

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I think age does have a lot to do with it. But it seems near me we're going through a transition in the average age of the farmers, the sons are starting to take over the operations. Younger farmers usually means easier access in my opinion.

It is a law of averages though, you just need to knock on a lot of doors and don't get discouraged by being told no. All the advice given so far is good. Also make sure you ask where you're allowed to park and not park and leave your keys in the truck in case they need to move it (and tell them you're doing this). You aren't in the city anymore, no one is going to steal anything and it gives the farmer the subtle hint that you trust him and want to be as little a nuisance as possible.

Also, don't drive in ANY field or suggest doing so unless HE offers first. Even though that field is going to get plowed, disced, and planted again and your tracks will make no difference at all, I've found NOTHING irritates a farmer more than a bunch of trucks and trailers driving around in his fields. I know it's a lot of extra work but look at it this way, some people pay good money for a workout like that.

You should strive to be next to invisible to the farmer once you've gotten permission. I agree with the ideas for gifts and such afterwards, but ideally he should be surprised to find you've already hunted. When they didn't even realize you'd been there your chances for future permission will increase.

JMHO
 

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Also, don't drive in ANY field or suggest doing so unless HE offers first. Even though that field is going to get plowed, disced, and planted again and your tracks will make no difference at all
Even if the farmer says you can drive, just make sure his/her fields are conventional tillage and not no till if he doesn't provide that information and just expects you know...I wouldn't want to be the one driving in a wet no till field ;)

Other than that good luck and some really good advice that this college student might try in the future :D
 

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some simple rules that might help your chances-

the don'ts:

never pull a farmer off his equipment to do you the favor of listening to your story. THEY'RE WORKING HERE FOR CRIPES SAKES! time is money right now!

Dont drive out into his field to meet him

don't pull them from the dinner table

Don't bother them during milking

and don't bug them when they're repairing equipment. (they'll be sour for sure. idle machinery = no money/lost revenue)
So you are saying that you either have to wake them up in the middle of the night or catch them in the bathroom to ask permission? :)

This time of year it is really tough to catch a farmer when he is not in the middle of something. It seems like winter time is the only time they slow a bit to catch a breath.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the advice everyone, and for everyone who said "you're not in the city anymore", trust me I was raised in the woods of Northern Michigan, where all the city folk come to their second homes, I want nothing to do with the city. But thanks again everyone, I will try some of this advice out probably this weekend and this coming week.
 

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Yes, they're extremely busy right now, but you'll know your shot when it's there. A good time is when they're coming into/out of their fields.

basically, I was trying to say that if you drive out into the field to meet him on the tractor, he has to stop forward movement and shut er down so that he can do you the favor of listening to your story... he's going to be sour.

Make a hungry, dog tired farmer get up from the dinner table ... not good either.


remember, they're doing YOU the favor - what's in it for them? and if it's as good of a spot as you think it is... 10 people probably tried to get on before you doing the same thing.

Just put yourself if their shoes is what I'm saying.
 

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If you want to talk to all the farmers, go to the small town diner that opens at 5:00AM. The only clientele in there will be farmers.
I would make an announcement in there stating you would like to hunt geese, who has any around and will allow me to hunt?

I'll bet, off their turf, someone will respect your iniative + cajones, and let you hunt. Prolly won't be the X, but it will get you in the game.
 

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Another way to get in with the farmers is to offer to help with whatever they are doing. When you plan to stop by make sure you have time and clothing to help them out with chores like stacking wood or whatever they are doing. When I use to bow hunt a farm in the Corunna area I would come up early saturday morning and hunt till lunch. Then whatever they were doing I would help them until it was time to go out for the evening hunt. Mostly splitting and stacking wood as all three houses burned wood. But sometimes mechanical stuff too. Extra hands are always welcome. One time I just stopped by and they were rebuilding an engine. I had the afternoon clear. Grandpa had told Grandma he couldnt do something for her because he had to help his son with the engine. Once I showed up and said I would stay he got to go in and tell her he would take her. You want to talk about brownie points for everybody!!! And we all know if Grandma isnt happy nobody is happy. All it cost me was an afternoon. Steve
 
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