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Wow, I was in high school... English I think, when the news broke.

Terrible disaster.
 

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Grade school, 2nd grade I believe. Only a handful of things I remember from grade school, this was one of them. We were in a classroom, I don't believe it was in the one I was being taught in at that age, we all saw it explode.

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
 

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I was in 7th grade PE class when I heard about it. I had gone back to the locker room and it was on the radio. I came back out and told my teacher about it and she said I was lying. Stupid ?itch made me run laps. About 10 minutes later another teacher came out of the locker room and told her what had happened. I instantly stopped running laps and gave her dirty looks. She never apologized, she was a male hater.

Now that I’m off my rant, this is the same day as my younger sister’s birthday. My family went to Cape Canaveral the same year but a lot of the tour was off limits as they were investigating the explosion.
 

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Setting in the day room in the barracks at Ft Bragg watching the tube, what a heart sinking feeling watching it unfold. :sad: :sad:
 

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I was in the lobby at a local community college and everyone was crowded around the TV. I was 19.
 

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Fifth grade, watched it happen on the TV in the class room.

Was also watcing TV on a Saturday morning when the other one broke up on reentry.

As an engineer now, the chain of events that lead to both these tradgedies is appaling and a lot of people should be jailed for negligent homicide based on the decisions they made. In both cases the engineers more or less told management what was going to happen, and were proven correct, but management rolled the dice with other people's lives.
 

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We carried parts of that shuttle when we were in trucking. We picked them up at the shuttle facility at White Sands, NM and took them to Edwards AFB, CA. It was eerie, and sobering, knowing what we were loading onto the truck.

When we got to Edwards the only way I could get backed in to where they wanted it unloaded was to drive out, onto the same runway, that Yeager flew off of when he broke the sound barrier. I was awed to be there, since Yeager was a boyhood idle of mine.

As we were unloading I could not help be think how it all started at Edwards, and how far we had come in such a short time, and yet, the dangers they faced at Edwards, were the same dangers that brought down the shuttle.
 

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At least the test pilots knew what they were getting into and to some extent could control their fate. The shuttle crews relied on people that probably didn't know jack about the glass transition temperature of the o-rings in the solid rocket boosters and bowed to pressure to make the launch on time after it had be delayed multiple times.

All of them that signed up for it regardless have a way bigger set than I do. The test pilots back in the late 40's, early 50's died at horrendous rates.
 

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At least the test pilots knew what they were getting into and to some extent could control their fate. The shuttle crews relied on people that probably didn't know jack about the glass transition temperature of the o-rings in the solid rocket boosters and bowed to pressure to make the launch on time after it had be delayed multiple times.

All of them that signed up for it regardless have a way bigger set than I do. The test pilots back in the late 40's, early 50's died at horrendous rates.

All who ride rockets know they are sitting on top of bombs that could go "off" at anytime. If it was not the "O" rings, something else could have done it.

Even taking into account the loss of the test pilots, we lost far fewer, at least so far, in space exploration, than most other explorations taken on by Man.
 

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Totally preventable and unexcusable. It was well understood that below a certain temperature the O-rings ceased to be rubber and turned brittle (in effect, turned into a glass, hence the term glass transition temperature) and would fail. They were below that temperature. Roger B at MT told his managers, they told NASA, NASA ignored them.

The foam strikes on the shuttle body were also a well known fault. Turns out the piece that fell off and holed the wing wasn't really needed after all anyway.
 

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They should not have used pure 02 in the early capsules. There should have been hatches that could open in an emergency.

It was preventable. There will be many more deaths, assuming we have the balls to continue exploring space. Some preventable, some not. It is the nature of such things. It's never good.
 
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