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I've sighted my Remington 700 in using 150 grain bullets in the past and have only been able to find 180 grain bullets with the shortage going on. Unfortunately I don't know if I'm going to have time to go shoot the 180s before I go out hunting, can anyone tell me how much of a difference I'm gonna see in accuracy? My shots will be 200 yards at the most and I have my gun zeroed at 100, would I have to aim any differently with the heavier bullets?
 

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I've sighted my Remington 700 in using 150 grain bullets in the past and have only been able to find 180 grain bullets with the shortage going on. Unfortunately I don't know if I'm going to have time to go shoot the 180s before I go out hunting, can anyone tell me how much of a difference I'm gonna see in accuracy? My shots will be 200 yards at the most and I have my gun zeroed at 100, would I have to aim any differently with the heavier bullets?
The 180s will probably hit a bit lower . It would be irresponsible to shoot at an animal without sighting in those bullets. Big difference between knowing and maybe. Good Luck
 

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I've shot both 180 gr. and 150 gr. out of a Remington 742, and my Tikka T3x and was very surprised that I saw zero difference.

I shot the 742 to 100 yds. and the Tikka to 200 yds. I honestly thought there would be a difference, but there was no meaningful vertical change with the groups.
 

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I've shot both 180 gr. and 150 gr. out of a Remington 742, and my Tikka T3x and was very surprised that I saw zero difference. I shot the 742 to 100 yds. and the Tikka to 200 yds. I honestly thought there would be a difference, but there was nothing noticeable with the groups.
Some rifles are like that and some aren’t
 

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Since I was curious, and since I'm sitting here at my computer I decided to look it up. Out to 200 yds. with the bullet profiles the same you're not going to see a difference. The biggest difference beyond 200 yds. has to do with the bullet profile.

But don't take my word for it, it looks like the Air Force did an exhaustive study on it. If you want to read 23 pages on it have at it :) https://apps.dtic.mil/sti/pdfs/ADA570469.pdf
 

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We did this once. Dad and I both hunted with core lokts forever, both 30-06. Usually we used 180s but we had a couple boxes of 150s given to us and had some 220s too.

Dad said out to 150-200yds would probably be little difference. I was skeptical and with my Rifle being as picky as it is I wanted to see before trusting it. I tend to overthink these things.

Dads Rem 700 will spit out anything pretty decent we have found. My Savage 111 is more accurate, but only when using certain ammo. Turns out the 150 & 180 were barely with difference to notice and not enough to care. The 220s were a bit lower, but not enough to care.

I would still shoot it though, just because I over think these things and I want 100% confidence in every trigger squeeze.

Worst case, just wait until getting to camp the last hour of daylight on Nov 14th like everyone else! 🤣
 

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.........
Unfortunately I don't know if I'm going to have time to go shoot the 180s before I go out hunting,
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6 weekends before the gun open. This is important, find the time.
About 15 years ago when I dropped down from 180 to 165 with my 30-06 I remember that there was a difference. Can't remember how much, but what I do remember is that my gun liked 165s better. My groups were noticeaby closer with 165s. Shooting from a leadsled so I'm confident that it was the shell making the difference not the guy pulling the trigger.
If you find that your grouping isn't the best this year, find a box of 165s and see if your gun shoots those better than 150s or 180s. Ya might as well shoot what your likes the best.
Please share your findings, it's how we learn.

L & O
 

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6 weekends before the gun open. This is important, find the time.
About 15 years ago when I dropped down from 180 to 165 with my 30-06 I remember that there was a difference. Can't remember how much, but what I do remember is that my gun liked 165s better. My groups were noticeaby closer with 165s. Shooting from a leadsled so I'm confident that it was the shell making the difference not the guy pulling the trigger.
If you find that your grouping isn't the best this year, find a box of 165s and see if your gun shoots those better than 150s or 180s. Ya might as well shoot what your likes the best.
Please share your findings, it's how we learn.

L & O
What brand where the 165s? Just curious.

I have all my ammo packed up right now, but I think I have some Winchester’s in 165. I have a couple different grains I have yet to try that I acquired during the great ammo shortage.
 

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Each gun is a rule unto itself. As noted above, some barrels will throw different bullets, let alone bullet weights, into different points of impact or different trajectories. Add in different lots of ammo, different temperature ranges, or even a different grip on your gun, and variables start to add up. Some rifles will walk up the target as they heat up; others will throw the first cold shot wide and the rest into a tiny group.

If you don’t know where this gun puts that ammo, it could cost you a hit at longer range. Perhaps inside 50-75 yards, it might not matter. Or if you have one of those barrels that puts everything on a baseball, regardless of weight, lot, bullet shape or velocity, perhaps you’re in luck.

As an old Gun Digest article once said, you have to “shoot em and see.”
 

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Each gun is a rule unto itself. As noted above, some barrels will throw different bullets, let alone bullet weights, into different points of impact or different trajectories. Add in different lots of ammo, different temperature ranges, or even a different grip on your gun, and variables start to add up. Some rifles will walk up the target as they heat up; others will throw the first cold shot wide and the rest into a tiny group.

If you don’t know where this gun puts that ammo, it could cost you a hit at longer range. Perhaps inside 50-75 yards, it might not matter. Or if you have one of those barrels that puts everything on a baseball, regardless of weight, lot, bullet shape or velocity, perhaps you’re in luck.

As an old Gun Digest article once said, you have to “shoot em and see.”
X2 - Don't try to guess and don't ask anyone else what they think. The only way to know is to shoot the new ammo and know for sure if you need to make a scope adjustment. The odds aren't with you if you think they will shoot in the same hole as the old ammo.
 
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