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Not sure, but I would just keep pruning off anything that starts to look weak or too leggy. Squash/zucchini (like most plants, really) responds pretty well to pruning.
I picked 9 or 10 squash from those plants before the heat wave at which point they quit producing female flowers. They are already setting another batch of female flowers and looking fairly healthy considering the stem condition.
 

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My Gramps said the same. Never a problem until maybe 10 yrs ago.

Heck I put some in pots and they still eventually got it.
I don't remember this tomato and cucumber blight being here 30-40 years ago. We picked all the table & canning pickles my mother cared to deal with. We would have to pick and toss cucumbers in order to keep them producing for the table. Frost killed the plants. Now its tough to get enough for canning before the plant get nuked. We picked ripe tomatoes by the bushel every year. Wasn't any critters eating the garden either. I do not remember my grandfathers garden having issues either. We had a multi-family garden there for a few years after my grandmother passed in the late 70s. Still remember gramps old Farmall and his tow behind potato harvester. Wish I had both of them. Potatoes were stored in a large wooden box filled with sand built off the floor in his Michigan basement.
 

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I don't remember this tomato and cucumber blight being here 30-40 years ago. We picked all the table & canning pickles my mother cared to deal with. We would have to pick and toss cucumbers in order to keep them producing for the table. Frost killed the plants. Now its tough to get enough for canning before the plant get nuked. We picked ripe tomatoes by the bushel every year. Wasn't any critters eating the garden either. I do not remember my grandfathers garden having issues either. We had a multi-family garden there for a few years after my grandmother passed in the late 70s. Still remember gramps old Farmall and his tow behind potato harvester. Wish I had both of them. Potatoes were stored in a large wooden box filled with sand built off the floor in his Michigan basement.
Exactly!
 

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I don't remember this tomato and cucumber blight being here 30-40 years ago. We picked all the table & canning pickles my mother cared to deal with. We would have to pick and toss cucumbers in order to keep them producing for the table. Frost killed the plants. Now its tough to get enough for canning before the plant get nuked. We picked ripe tomatoes by the bushel every year. Wasn't any critters eating the garden either. I do not remember my grandfathers garden having issues either. We had a multi-family garden there for a few years after my grandmother passed in the late 70s. Still remember gramps old Farmall and his tow behind potato harvester. Wish I had both of them. Potatoes were stored in a large wooden box filled with sand built off the floor in his Michigan basement.
Most of my family, friends and neighbors up here North of M55 raise gardens, and we all bitch about frost, cold snaps, drought, bugs and 4-legged pests, but I never hear much about blight. The thing I always notice on this thread is everyone that has blight problems is planting 3-4 weeks before I can and enjoying their harvest 3-4 weeks before me. Must be a climate issue that you probably can't do anything about, except sell out and move north!
 

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Most of my family, friends and neighbors up here North of M55 raise gardens, and we all bitch about frost, cold snaps, drought, bugs and 4-legged pests, but I never hear much about blight. The thing I always notice on this thread is everyone that has blight problems is planting 3-4 weeks before I can and enjoying their harvest 3-4 weeks before me. Must be a climate issue that you probably can't do anything about, except sell out and move north!
There certainly seems to be a relationship with timing. Environmental conditions for growing bacteria and fungus can be pretty key.

But... it's certainly possible it just hasn't gotten to you geographically yet...
 

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Discussion Starter · #452 ·
Seeing evidence of hornworms on a few tomato plants, haven’t been able to find them though….
Seems like we get them SOB's every year. No evidence yet. The wife will see them easier than me. Plucks them off and gives them to her girls {chickens}. Posted a pic in either last years thread or the year before with one being covered in wasp eggs....I'll look for it. :cool:
 

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No tomatoes, cukes or beans up here yet, I'm 3-4 weeks behind most of you guys. I have harvested my peas, been picking broccoli, and 95% of my garlic is harvested. Decided to sit down and clean up some of the bulbs this evening. View attachment 844690 View attachment 844687 View attachment 844686
Nice, you grew a significant amount. This was our first year growing the larger species. We ate the first one without drying it out first. Tasty, but not pungent like good garlic. We're going to pull them this weekend.

Picked 4# of beans Sunday, went out this afternoon and got 6#. Guess we're freezing produce this weekend.
Food Plant Bean Ingredient Natural foods
 

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View attachment 844948

Not sure what up with this guy. Started off great lots of squash coming in but the middle of it has started to yellow and die but the ends are green and healthy. Any tips or advice to save it?
Check near the base and see how the main stem looks - you might have a borer or split vine. If that's the case, I've had some luck mounding dirt over the vine until the next leaf union.

 
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