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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
2009 Preliminary Deer Season Report

The DNR closed nearly half of it's deer check stations this year due to budget constraints. Because of this there was about a 36% decline in the number of deer being brought in to be checked. This year there were 720,398 licensed deer hunters in Michigan which reflected a 1% decrease in license sales for 2009.

Biologists at the check stations reported a significant decrease in the number of yearling bucks being brought into check stations. Many of the antlered deer checked this year were presumed to be aged at 2 1/2 years old or older. Even though the age class of checked deer this year was higher than in previous years. Biologists said the state showed smaller than average antlered beam development in deer checked form the northern regions.

Upper Peninsula

The UP showed a 20-30 % drop in harvest rates for 2009. DNR Biologists feel this was due in part to the harsh wintering conditions experienced by the herd in 2008. This was also coupled by the fact that there was a moderate decrease in both fawn production and survival rates from the previous year.

Northern Lower Peninsula

The NLP showed a 15-25% decrease in harvest rates for 2009. Biologists feel this was due in part to the harsh wintering conditions experienced by the herd in 2008. This was also coupled by the fact that there was a moderate decrease in both fawn production and survival rates from the previous year. The harsh wintering conditions are also thought to be a strong contributing factor for the poor antler development in bucks for the region.

Southern Lower Peninsula

The SLP showed a 5-10% decrease in harvest rates for 2009. The SLP did not experience the harsh wintering conditions for the herd as did the UP and NLP. Biologist feel the decrease in harvest was due to the fact that corn harvest for the region was only at 35% for the start of rifle season. The lack of dry weather conditions and above normal temperatures for October allowed for farmers to leave corn standing. This made for good bedding,feeding and cover habitat for the deer. Fawn production and survival rates are believed to be slightly higher than expected as well.

Disease Testing for 2009

The DNR conducted strict testing procedures for Chronic Waisting Disease in Kent Co. this year. All deer harvested were to be brought to mandatory deer check stations, nine townships bordering the Cervid Facility were CWD was found were required to bring all deer in for testing. In all 1000 deer were checked. Biologists report no further spread of the disease has been found. Testing for CWD in the area will remain in effect for a time frame of 3 more years to aid in determining that the infected animal was an isolated case.

Testing for TB was conducted again this year in DMU 452. In all 5000 deer were brought in for testing, four deer have shown positive results for having contracted the disease and results from four other deer were inconclusive at the time of the NRC meeting but are believed to come back as being positive for having TB.
Testing results have shown that in the past nine years 183,000 deer have been checked for TB. Of the animals tested 465 have shown positives cultures for TB. Biologist's stated that they have seen a "good" decrease in the amount of agriculture (bait) products being found in deer that are being tested and feel the baiting ban in the area is proving beneficial.
 

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Thanks for posting that report. Deer sightings as well as shooting were down in the area of Oscoda Co. that I hunt.
 

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I was under the impression from the farmer who leases the property I hunt that the reason he wasn't going to harvest corn at the normal time was because it wasn't dry enough, so I am confused by the "lack of wet weather" causing a delayed corn harvest stated below.




Southern Lower Peninsula
The lack of wet weather conditions and above normal temperatures for October allowed for farmers to leave corn standing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was under the impression from the farmer who leases the property I hunt that the reason he wasn't going to harvest corn at the normal time was because it wasn't dry enough, so I am confused by the "lack of wet weather" causing a delayed corn harvest stated below.
I'm assuming they ment dry weather.
 

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...... so I am confused by the "lack of wet weather" causing a delayed corn harvest stated below.
Reference is to the dry conditions during the growing season for some areas.
 

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The corn is all down and our deer numbers in the SLP were I hunt are still way way down ?????????????? Harvest in our section is down 75 percent this Year!
 

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Up north it was wet weather that kept farmers out of the harvest fields especially in nontiled fields.

Having said that the report contains nothing more than spin and excuses by the dnr IMO.

After talking with some large farmers up here, they say the number of deer in the corn was much lower than last year.
 

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2009 Preliminary Deer Season Report

Southern Lower Peninsula

The SLP showed a 5-10% decrease in harvest rates for 2009. The SLP did not experience the harsh wintering conditions for the herd as did the UP and NLP. Biologist feel the decrease in harvest was due to the fact that corn harvest for the region was only at 35% for the start of rifle season. The lack of dry weather conditions and above normal temperatures for October allowed for farmers to leave corn standing. This made for good bedding,feeding and cover habitat for the deer. Fawn production and survival rates are believed to be slightly higher than expected as well.
Bold emphasis mine.

So fawn production is at least "slightly higher than expected" in the SLP. It might be hard to accept for many of us, but if we believe the SLP is overpopulated with deer, would it be a good idea to start whacking little 65 pound Bambis? In the NLP and UP, those little ones wouldn't survive a harsh winter as we're seeing, but down here they thrive apparently, and we as top predators should perhaps be fulfilling our role in that, no? The knowledgeable QDMers can jump in here, but this just seems at least a point of thought, if we sense an overpopulation of deer.

I made the trek to/from Lenawee yesterday, not many fresh roadkills this time, but we'll see come February how it looks (and the roadkills might just be getting scarfed up more efficiently, in these hard times. My SIL's morning hunt ended early one day, pulling out of his driveway long before shooting light, when his headlights illuminated a fresh kill at the end of his drive. Much-appreciated freezer material for the family.).
 

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I'm not a QDMA expert by no means, but I have read many times over that taking fawns or "bambi's" is better for the herd than shooting a mature doe. This is because it takes more food to sustain a growing deer than it does to sustain a mature deer during the winter months. And even in areas of reduced population it would make more sense to take the fawn that may not have been breed, as opposed to the mature doe that may be carring two or more fawns. Now in the southern lower where populations are on the rise it would make more sense to shoot the mature doe as to reduce the population by as many as 3 deer with one kill. Like I said , I'm no expert but I do like to read.:evil:
 

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2009 Preliminary Deer Season Report

The DNR closed nearly half of it's deer check stations this year due to budget constraints. Because of this there was about a 36% decline in the number of deer being brought in to be checked. This year there were 720,398 licensed deer hunters in Michigan which reflected a 1% decrease in license sales for 2009.

Biologists at the check stations reported a significant decrease in the number of yearling bucks being brought into check stations. Many of the antlered deer checked this year were presumed to be aged at 2 1/2 years old or older. Even though the age class of checked deer this year was higher than in previous years. Biologists said the state showed smaller than average antlered beam development in deer checked form the northern regions.

Upper Peninsula

The UP showed a 20-30 % drop in harvest rates for 2009. DNR Biologists feel this was due in part to the harsh wintering conditions experienced by the herd in 2008. This was also coupled by the fact that there was a moderate decrease in both fawn production and survival rates from the previous year.

Northern Lower Peninsula

The NLP showed a 15-25% decrease in harvest rates for 2009. Biologists feel this was due in part to the harsh wintering conditions experienced by the herd in 2008. This was also coupled by the fact that there was a moderate decrease in both fawn production and survival rates from the previous year. The harsh wintering conditions are also thought to be a strong contributing factor for the poor antler development in bucks for the region.

Southern Lower Peninsula

The SLP showed a 5-10% decrease in harvest rates for 2009. The SLP did not experience the harsh wintering conditions for the herd as did the UP and NLP. Biologist feel the decrease in harvest was due to the fact that corn harvest for the region was only at 35% for the start of rifle season. The lack of dry weather conditions and above normal temperatures for October allowed for farmers to leave corn standing. This made for good bedding,feeding and cover habitat for the deer. Fawn production and survival rates are believed to be slightly higher than expected as well.

Disease Testing for 2009

The DNR conducted strict testing procedures for Chronic Waisting Disease in Kent Co. this year. All deer harvested were to be brought to mandatory deer check stations, nine townships bordering the Cervid Facility were CWD was found were required to bring all deer in for testing. In all 1000 deer were checked. Biologists report no further spread of the disease has been found. Testing for CWD in the area will remain in effect for a time frame of 3 more years to aid in determining that the infected animal was an isolated case.

Testing for TB was conducted again this year in DMU 452. In all 5000 deer were brought in for testing, four deer have shown positive results for having contracted the disease and results from four other deer were inconclusive at the time of the NRC meeting but are believed to come back as being positive for having TB.
Testing results have shown that in the past nine years 183,000 deer have been checked for TB. Of the animals tested 465 have shown positives cultures for TB. Biologist's stated that they have seen a "good" decrease in the amount of agriculture (bait) products being found in deer that are being tested and feel the baiting ban in the area is proving beneficial.
:eek: Thanks for the report but, these figures seem to be way off base as a decrease in harvests 20-30%,15-25% and 5-10%.Quite a gap in the percentages. It seems to me they are guessing. According to the M.D.N.R.'s own reports is that the deer herds numbers are backed by scientific reasoning, but I will wait for the final report.
 

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20-30% for the UP huh? When I came back across the bridge the count for the year was about 35-40% below that point last year. I think they're off a bit, and the season wasn't as good as the DNR may think.

I guess we'll see. I'm hoping for a milder winter in the UP this year for the herd, but that's if the wolves don't get them too.
 
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