Wisconson cwd map

Discussion in 'Whitetail Deer Disease' started by dfbear, Dec 3, 2019.

  1. dfbear

    dfbear

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    Wisconsin over turned their baiting Ban check it out.
    should Michigan take the risk?
     
  2. poz

    poz

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    Where's the map. Lol
     

  3. Waif

    Waif

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  4. nothbound

    nothbound

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    Screenshot_20191204-072300_Samsung Internet.jpg

    I'll play along and post the map.. dark counties ban bait, while white
    counties it's legal as far as dnr is concerned. However.... some of those counties where dnr allows baiting, the counties have ordinances against it (my home county is one of those) . Get caught baiting in some counties and you get a fine from dnr and then also one from sheriff dept
     
  5. Joe Archer

    Joe Archer Staff Member Mods

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    If Wisconsin overturned their baiting ban, they probably realized that banning bait was not an effective means to limit the spread of CWD. Really, the ONLY known way to limit the spread is to reduce population density without protecting yearling bucks! EVERYONE has known this from day one, but no one has been able to do this.
    CWD is spread in the environment through the shed of prions. As prevalence goes up, the shed of prions goes up. These prions are basically indestructible. They will exist in the environment indefinitely. The more prions that are shed, the faster the increase in prevalence... and so on... and so on..
    Yearling buck dispersal is a known factor that limits containment.
    End of story. Bait or no bait ... CWD will spread because nobody has been able to do what is needed.
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  6. NbyNW

    NbyNW

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    What risk?

    Until a state does an in depth study assessing prion levels between multiple sites, bedding, apple trees, food plots, licking branches, scrapes, etc we are just hypothesizing.
    The real risk is the APRs in CWD zones. Lost a lot of respect for the state because of this.
     
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  7. Chessieman

    Chessieman

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    I wonder if the counties in Michigan could even do that legally? I am surprised some of our GRANDSTANDING politicians have not tried it!
     
  8. nothbound

    nothbound

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    To play devil's advocate, perhaps lessening the heard and buck dispersal actually hurts. Studies have been made that some deer are resistant to cwd. Thus when man steps in trying to control we actually kill off our cwd resistant breeding stock? Not to mention if buck dispersal doesn't occur inbreeding is inevitably going to occur. Perhaps the best thing would be to let nature control the herd and we go fishing rather than hunt.
     
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  9. Joe Archer

    Joe Archer Staff Member Mods

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    Dead bucks don't breed.
    If you look at the spread of disease in Wisconsin, and consider CWD to be in its infancy there; it should be fairly obvious that if natural selection were a viable option, you probably wouldn't see any effect for 1000's of years.
    But hey "at least there's a chance"; right?
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  10. NbyNW

    NbyNW

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    Both valid points, many of the answers to these issues wont be resolved in any of our lifetimes. In the big picture our time on earth is very small.
     
  11. nothbound

    nothbound

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    Dead bucks don't breed is exactly my point. How do we tell the cwd resistant bucks from the cwd vulnerable bucks while we cull? If the resistant bucks and does are dead they can't pass on their cwd resistant genes.

    I watched dumpsters fill up with deer first had in Wisconsin right after cwd discovery. Then hunting was horrible obviously. Now it's getting better that everyone kinda just stopped caring about it and trying to fix something that humans can't fix.

    Yes you're absolutely correct that it's a recent problem in Wisconsin. Perhaps we should look at states that have had it for decades and do what they do, which is basically ignoring it?
     
  12. Joe Archer

    Joe Archer Staff Member Mods

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    Would you feel the same way if the Wisconsin conditions outlined below were in your backyard? Realizing that in your lifetime it will do nothing except get worse from here on out.

    Adult deer have higher prevalence than yearlings and males have higher prevalence than females.
    • In the southwest monitored area of Dane and Iowa counties:
      • Adult male prevalence rate has increased from 8-10 to 35 percent since 2002.
      • Adult female prevalence rate has increased from 3-4 to 15 percent.
      • Yearling male prevalence rate has increased from 2 to 13 percent since 2002.
      • Yearling female prevalence rate has increased from 2 to 10 percent.
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  13. nothbound

    nothbound

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    Yes my opinions are hindsight, as I mentioned I watched dumpsters fill up with deer. In fact I hunted in dane and Iowa counties over this last Thanksgiving weekend as usual (family in Dane county) Which is basically the worst area in Wisconsin for the disease. Hate to say it but the only good that came from what we thought was the right thing to do years ago is lessened hunter numbers in a area where public land was too crowded. The hunting has rebounded now that the slaughter method has been given up on by hunters.
     
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  14. Cork Dust

    Cork Dust

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    Nice compact, less than reality rendition to fit your preconceptions: 1.) Both does and bucks disperse. When does disperse, they tend to travel further than yearling bucks. 2.) Only known way to limit CWD spread is to limit, DIRECT CONTACT of cervids as well as limit incidence to levels below .01%; approaches to limit direct contact and contact with concentrations of urine and feces include herd density reductions, decreasing buck segment age structure, limiting fecal/oral contact at concentrated feeds sites that are not agriculture or silvaculture related i.e. baiting sites 3.) I read no reason given by anyone in Wisconsin who represented the WDNR or State, yet you apparently were able to discern their reasoning...by offering yours. 4.) Prions are resilient, not indestructible within the environment. 5.) "The more prions that are shed, the faster the increase in prevalence..." True, with one very important caveat: The rate of spread has two components that impact CWD prevalence; rate of shedding as well as the geographic area those CWD infectious prions are spread over...again, where baiting bans can play a significant role in reducing spread by limiting concentrations of deer within those parameters that can be controlled by a ban.

    Wisconsin lost their fight for CWD containment a long time ago, because the Public determined that their wildlife managers were not acting on their interests...based on BS information. Just like you see Michigan deer hunters doing now.
     
  15. Joe Archer

    Joe Archer Staff Member Mods

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    Make no mistake; I am not advocating slaughter. I disagreed with the plan to cull and waste deer from a disease area.
    I am advocating that hunters take more doe, and also that regulations do not protect yearling bucks.
    Reducing hunter participation in a disease area is likely to reduce harvest numbers, and likely to continue to boost prevalence numbers moving forward.
    Do you eat the deer that you kill in the disease zone? Do you have your deer tested before eating, or are you not concerned about potentially consuming prions? What about feeding prions to your family?
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