Winterizing an outboard or not?

Discussion in 'Boating and Boat Rigging' started by Slimshady, Sep 14, 2020.

  1. sherman51

    sherman51

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    I guess I'm the oddball here. I've never fogged my 2 stroke outboards and I've owned them for over 45 yrs. I only change the lower unit oil when I change the water pump, about every 4 or 5 yrs. never had a lower unit go bad. but did smoke a piston on an old johnson many yrs ago that had a low pitched prop and no tach. the only reason for getting rid of a motor was to upgrade. i store my outboards for months at a time from Sept to March or early April and have never had trouble using them the next spring.

    the one thing I do if I use them in cold weather is pull the boat out then pull over and lower the motor and allow the water to drain, raise the motor and take her home. I've used a boat in the cold a few times to cross Brookville lake to deer hunt the other side. and all I did was drain water out of it before taking it home. then I lower it again at home to drain any excess water I missed at the ramp.
     
  2. lostontheice

    lostontheice

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    Is "winterizing" the same for 2 Stoke v 4 stroke?.. I just bought my first boat and it has a 90hp 2 stroke Johnson.. What do I actually need to do to store it for the freeze season?.. I would like to be able to grab n go if the river doesn't freeze this year (like last year).. Thanks for any tips/tricks for a new owner..
     

  3. sureshot006

    sureshot006 Staff Member Mods

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    Lower unit oil is fine more than a year if it doesn't get water in it. Oil annually is so much cheaper than lower unit...
     
  4. Topshelf

    Topshelf

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    So why wouldn't you run the fuel out of a VRO motor? I just got one this year and haven't had any problems with it, but typically I run the fuel out of motors at the end of a season to keep it from getting nasty and gumming up injectors or carburetors.

    The second subject is winterizing the live wells. What do you guys do to winterize live wells if anything? Again first boat I've ever had, that has had live wells. It's a 97 18' Lund Fisherman.

    My normal for winterizing an outboard is to run the fuel out, put some Staybil in the tank, check and or replace the lower unit oil, take the prop off and make sure there isn't any mono or anything wrapped around the prop shaft. I also bring the batteries inside put them on a trickle charger.
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  5. georgeb

    georgeb

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    The VRO should not be ran without oil or gas, it could cause future problems. The VRO system is designed for both fuel and oil at the same time, you are playing with a very expensive replacement if bad things happen, not to mention the tow in from where it fails.

    Below is the recommendation from Crowley marine for Evinrude/Johnson winterization.

    https://www.crowleymarine.com/d/tech_article/johnson-2-stroke-winterization

    Edit to add, the best thing is use ethanol free fuel for storage

    Fuel System Treatment

    Stabilize the boat's fuel supply with Evinrude/Johnson 2+4 Fuel Conditioner following the instructions on the container.

    Prepare a "storage mixture" of fuel in a separate outboard six gallon fuel tank. The storage mixture should consist of:

    • 5 gallons of fuel

    • 2 quarts of Evinrude/Johnson Storage Fogging Oil

    • 2.5 ounces of Evinrude/Johnson 2+4 Fuel Conditioner

    • 1 pint of Evinrude/Johnson outboard lubricant
    Temporarily connect fuel tank with storage mixture to the outboard. Leave oil supply hose connected to the outboard.

    Shift the remote control to NEUTRAL and remove the propeller.

    START outboard and RUN at IDLE speed for ten minutes to ensure that the entire fuel system is filled with the storage mixture.

    Turn key switch to OFF position to STOP outboard. Proceed with Internal Engine Treatment.

    Internal Engine Treatment
    Use Evinrude/Johnson Storage Fogging Oil to prevent corrosion of internal engine components during periods of storage.

    Remove the air silencer.

    START outboard and run at IDLE.

    Spray approx. two ounces of Evinrude/Johnson Storage Fogging Oil through the throttle plate hole of each cylinder while outboard is running.

    Turn key switch to OFF to STOP outboard.

    Reconnect boat fuel supply hose.

    DO NOT restart outboard until it goes back into service.
     
  6. Topshelf

    Topshelf

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    I doubt any motor will run without oil or GAS? I'm not trying to be a jerk, I'm just saying it won't run without gas. The oil injection pump works hand in hand with the gas. So if the motor is not running, the oil injector is not doing anything either.

    I just didn't know if the VROs had some kind of a quirk having to do with letting them run out of fuel?

    I've been running two strokes WITH carburators out of gas to winterize, either oil injected or mixed 50 to 1 in the tank for 40 years. Come springtime hook the gas line back up, pump the bulb and fire it up. Never had an issue.
    I'm not even big on fogging the motor. Seems unnecessary unless you're going to leave it in storage for a year or so.

    If you don't run the fuel out of the carburetor bowl of anything that's carbureted you will have issues come 3 months later. Today's fuel, and even rec fuel will go bad a whole lot quicker than it used to. You'll end up with gummed up jets in your carburetor and it won't run. That's an expensive fix to send to the outboard mechanic come springtime.

    I only run Rec fuel in my boat, motorcycle and vintage Mustang.

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  7. SteelShot

    SteelShot

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    I have not had a four stroke so can’t comment. For the two stroke as others have said change the lower unit oil. The main purpose is to get any water out of that may have seeped in through a bad seal. The other thing is to put the motor down to get all the water to drain out. Fogging oil should be used for long periods of storage and definitely keep your battery on a trickle charger.


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  8. georgeb

    georgeb

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    Attached is VRO operation directly from Evinrude, See red text esp. underlined section

    here is a clip of the PDF

    If air gets into the fuel, it causes a foamy solution, similar to a head of beer in a tall glass. (A vapor lock situation does the same thing ). The volume of liquid fuel is less and the oil delivered is the same as for a full chamber of fuel. Now you have richer gas oil mix with its resulting symptoms. A fuel restriction such as from a bad anti-siphon valve, kinked line, or a partially plugged filter does not allow a full charge of gas to be drawn into the fuel pump cavity. Again, you get the full shot of oil mixing with less gas. This is also the reason to not disconnect the gas line and run the engine "dry". As you run out of fuel, the oil still pumps, filling the lines and carbs with your favorite TC-W3 lubricant.
     

    Attached Files:

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  9. georgeb

    georgeb

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    here is more to consider above Evinrude/Johnson's recommendation of not running the VRO without fuel/oil together

    A VRO runs off pulses from the combustion of the fuel/oil. The pulse is passed through the pulse limiter which is a small screen for a lack of a better explanation. The combustion pulse actuates the diaphragm in the VRO which is the fuel/oil pump and that is when the gas and oil get mixed together.

    When a fuel line is pulled off a motor (any motor) the air fuel ratio is impacted causing the motor to run in a progressive lean state to the no fuel shutdown. This is not an instant operation it takes a few seconds. As the fuel/air ratio goes towards lean the motor combustion temperature increases causing a lean misfire. The lean misfire can over time damage the pulse limiter which will over time damage the VRO diaphragm.

    This happened to me from excesses ethanol in the fuel I purchased when I first owned my VRO equipped motor. The net result of the damage was a $1000 replacement. The ethanol also caused fuel lines and carb damage which is why it was so expensive. I replaced anything that flowed oil or gas to be safe, but that was above the VRO damage cost.

    After the replacement I learned as much as I could about the operation of the VRO so I did not cause any other problems. This is how I learned about recreation fuel and about ethanol in regular unleaded fuel. I also found out what the alarm tones are from the VRO and made sure they were functioning correctly in hopes of catching a problem before damage occurred.

    I hope this helps, I am just trying to help others not spend money on a problem that they might create without meaning to cause.
     
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  10. Topshelf

    Topshelf

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    Okay so now I understand. I guess I was thinking about old school oil injectors that weren't as sophisticated as this VRO system.
    I think what I'll probably end up doing then is putting some stabil in it so the fuel doesn't break down. I'm still on the fence on fogging so we'll see on that.

    I appreciate the info though. I'm new to this motor and didn't realize it was that sophisticated and technical. The last thing I want to do is end up having to spend a grand to get it fixed or worse.

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  11. Robert777

    Robert777

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    Gas is the key, remove it. Drain fuel by running engine until it stops after removing fuel line if your boat motor has carbs. Fuel injection? You need to do more.

    DO NOT USE ETHANOL IN YOUR BOAT. It absorbs water and gels then hardens in your carb, injection and fuel system. Boats, older cars, lawn mowers, all the same. Modern cars have closed sealed fuel systems so they are less effected by ethanol absorbing water and gelling and hardening in the fuel system.

    If your engine is fuel injected then manually drain the fuel injection pump tank, consult your manual to find the drain valve and don't be afraid, it is easy.

    As for oil, change that in the spring not the fall.

    I made a setup where I can attach a electric fuel pump instead of the regular gas line and with clips to the battery, pump the gas out of the fuel tank into an auxiliary 5 gallon tank and use it in my car.

    Never leave gas in your boat fuel system over winter, not a drop.

    In the spring you will be ready to go with all fresh ethanol free gas.

    Not doing this, draining all fuel cost me big bucks in boat fuel injection repair cost, so I just learned what I needed to know and now do it in the fall/winter no matter what.

    Thing is, I thought I was doing it right be just running my boat motor until it quit by disconnecting the fuel line, nope. There is still a small tank of fuel the high pressure fuel injection pump is setting in. All fuel injected boat motors have this same system. Unless you drain that tank, you got fuel still in your motor and it can absorb moisture, gel and harden and clog up your fuel injection pump and cost you a lot of cash to get fixed.

    That problem came from my assumption running the motor until it stopped was enough so I just stopped there and did not dig deeper and find out what was really needed and how to do it until after I had a problem and the boat would not start in the spring.

    ~
     
  12. ESOX

    ESOX Staff Member Super Mod Mods

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    I agree with everything but the ethanol free gas being overkill. Ethanol laden fuel is prone to water absorption and the subsequent phase separation. That doesn't happen with rec gas. Ill run ethanol in the summer, but Oct 1 I change over to make sure the entire system ifs purged of ethanol. And I still change my lower end dope annually, in the fall, to make sure I have all winter to fix it if there is an emulsion coming out, and to not allow any water that may be in there to freeze and blow otherwise good seals. ( Obviously if you have the amount of water in there that would have cracked the lower unit, it would have blown up for a want of lubrication already).
     
  13. gman

    gman

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    How do you clear the lines on the livewell? Blow them out with a shopvac? Hoping to extend the season on the water this fall myself. thank you
     
  14. CrawlerHarness

    CrawlerHarness

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    I have used a leaf blower, as well as an air hose with a rag wrapped around the nozzle to direct the air. I am guessing there are better ways.
     
  15. SteelShot

    SteelShot

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    Try a air blow nozzle with a rubber tip for the live well lines. You could also put in a tee, shutoff valve and a quick connect.

    Just hook up the compressor and open the valve.


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