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Treated seeds effect on birds

Discussion in 'Whitetail Deer Habitat' started by bishs, Jun 18, 2011.

  1. bishs

    bishs

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    In the past I have issues with crows wiping out my corn plots. They pull out the small plants and eat the seed. Now I plant rye with my corn. This works great. They can't seem to find the corn plants in the rye. Then I spray roundup when the corn is 6 inches tall. I planted corn 10 days ago, and again 5 days ago. The neighbor next to me planted 40 acres 12 days ago, and filled in some wet spots a few days ago. I walked down my lane two days ago and found two crows 30 yards apart in the fencerow. They are both dangling from limbs several feet off the ground. Wings wide open, drool hanging out of their beaks. Very close to death. I am sure they ate too much treated corn seed. Not a pretty site. They are a few feet from my neighbors newly planted corn field.

    I wonder how many pheasants we lose to corn each year. I read the warning label and it saids deadly to birds, animals and people if swallowed.
     
  2. hypox

    hypox

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    I hear ya. I think the same thing with all the pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers people use in their yards and gardens. I bet the real numbers are devastating on all kinds of animals.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 30, 2015

  3. Rainman68

    Rainman68

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    :yeahthat:

    I wonder if anybody that thinks there are no bad effects would be willing to try some in their breakfast ;)
     
  4. TheGift

    TheGift Banned

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    all farmers should go organic only.
     
  5. casscityalum

    casscityalum Premium Member

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    Hmm I think ill stay outta this one lol. Gift, can you come to my class next fall and explain your thougts? Ill bring the soda and popcorn ;)

    OutdoorHub Mobile, the information engine of the outdoors
     
  6. Airoh

    Airoh Premium Member

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    Totally unrealistic. Get rid of six billion humans and you got a chance of that happening. But you won't won't like it when it does.
     
  7. LoBrass

    LoBrass Premium Member

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    :SHOCKED:

    If people could handle eating an apple that is not red but covered with apple scab, it would be possible (not likely).

    If folks could handle corn which has worms working down the kernal rows, it would be possible (again, not likely).

    And finally, with the reduced production due to no fertilizer or pest controls could our society handle losing MANY of our family members to starvation(once again though, not very likely)?

    Seeing the effects of a chemical poisoning would be a rough site. I for one am glad Bishs saw crows and not pheasants.

    BTW, I've cleaned turkeys with crops loaded with treated grain (corn, if memory serves me correct).
     
  8. TheGift

    TheGift Banned

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    what class? Pollution 101? People need to wakeup and realize what all these chemicals do to the crops let alone the soil quality. WWJD?
     
  9. TheGift

    TheGift Banned

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    This is honestly no different than the effects of prescripton drugs on the human body. When the body is put on medication that people think helps them but fail to realize that with an aggressive chiropractic treatments the body can heal itself. Ever wonder that all these meds really suppress the ability of the immune system which may cause cancer or other life threatening illness. What about the TB in whitetails? Maybe this is coming on more and more because herbicide resistant crops causing deformities in female deer with antlers etc. Stop and think about what all these chemicals can be doing to animals immune systems to where their body cant defend anymore and go into protection mode causing TB. Really think about this people.
     
  10. Nocturnal Ghost

    Nocturnal Ghost

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    My farm cats got into a bag of seed corn and ate a ton of it before I noticed and They are still here.
     
  11. farmlegend

    farmlegend Say My Name.

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    Do the math. There is not enough farm ground real estate in North America to feed the humans if farmers went organic. Food prices would skyrocket, millions would starve, and ensuing rioting/crime would result in a societal breakdown, ushering in some form of police state.

    I, for one, am fighting this cultural rot and putting my money where my mouth is, by boycotting any and all foodstuffs that bill theirselves as being organic. And nothing but the highest quality GMO seeds for my farm.

    Maybe if enough crows succumb the rest of 'em will stay the hell off of my food plots.
    :D
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2011
  12. casscityalum

    casscityalum Premium Member

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    "In 2050 there will be 2.3 billion people more to feed leading to a 70 percent increase in global food production, a newly released UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) paper warned.

    FAO estimates the total population in the year 2050 is set to reach 9.1 billion, with a third more mouths to feed. Demographic growth, together with rising incomes, will boost global food demand.

    World leaders' future challenges will be to ensure food security by combating hunger and poverty, reducing geographical inequalities, increasing efficiency in the use of natural resources such as water and adapting to climate change, the report added.

    Investment in primary agriculture should become a top priority and needs to increase by 60 percent, the paper added. Agriculture is crucial in that it not only produces food but also generates income and supports rural livelihoods.

    Cereal production is expected to rise by almost a billion tons from 2.1 billion today. However, global projections show that investments in other sectors will be needed as well to enhance access to food.

    The risk, otherwise, is leaving some 370 million people in hunger by 2050, amounting to nearly 5 percent of the developing countries' population.

    For the UN agency it is a crucial moment in global discussion on food emergency. The FAO paper opens the road to the High-Level Expert Forum to take place in Rome on October 12-13, which will bring together 300 leading experts from academic, nongovernmental and private sector institutions from developing and developed countries.

    Talks are to focus on finding solutions to tackle world famine in 2050. The forum's results will then prepare the ground for the World Summit on Food Security, scheduled in Rome for November 16-18.

    FAO Assistant Director-General Hafez Ghanem said "FAO is cautiously optimistic about the world's potential to feed itself by 2050" but many tough challenges lie ahead."

    Another Read


    Posted on March 25, 2011 by samhenry


    Why is George Soros investing in land in great quantities abroad? For the same reason countries such as China and India are purchasing farmlands outside their boarders.

    China purchased 100,000 hectares in Zimbabwe, part of a series of investments that have led to more than a million Chinese farmers in Africa. [The American]

    It is estimated that by 2050, the demand for food with population growth will double. Further, there are worries of climate change. The recent earth quake in Japan with the attendant radiation contamination of a portion of the food supply and tsunami delivery of salt water to profitable farmlands now join more traditional factors that figure into this mix:

    Increasing food prices are not the only reason for sovereign interest in foreign land purchases. The threat of export embargoes and a worldwide flirtation with protectionism, especially in the United States, have frightened food importers. The move toward securing farm land in faraway places can be seen not only as a bet on increasing food prices, but also as a hedge against a breakdown in world trade. Nations are showing a marked lack of faith in their ability to import food when supplies are in short supply. [The American]

    Soros started a private group to purchase farmlands around the globe as part of the new land rush or land grab as many call it. Of course Soros is in it to make money.

    Steve Fairchild, editor of Today’s Farmer, reports that George Soros raised $350 million to buy farmland in Eastern Europe, Central Asia, and Africa. [The American]

    And surprise, surprise, Midwest farmers are doing the same thing. They are forming private investor groups and buying farms in South America and elsewhere. And their lands are safe at this time from takeover.

    Productive and profitable farmers are likely to stay on the land, and will not be vulnerable to competitors from elsewhere. Neither China, India, nor the Gulf states have shown much interest in the American Midwest. [The American]

    Now a backlash against the sale of farmland to foreign interests has begun to spread.

    A coup in Madagascar was at least partially caused by concern over a proposed deal with a South Korean company for a 1.3 million hectare lease. Hungary promised to allow foreign investment in farmland upon its accession to the EU. The accession agreement would allow foreign investment beginning in 2011, but most of the leading political parties in Hungary favor reneging on the deal. The Philippines nixed a land contract with China because of concerns about local food security. Farm workers in Mozambique resisted the settlement of thousands of Chinese workers on their leased property there. Brazil is promising to end foreign investment in land. Development groups worry about the displacement of local farmers, the advent of a “new form of colonialism,” and the specter of natives going hungry while food is exported to the country that owns the farmland. [The American]

    __________________________________

    SELECTED SOURCES FOR FURTHER RESEARCH

    Journal of the American Enterprise Institute The American.

    Farmland Grab.Org

    Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems and Community Development

    US Department of Agriculture
     
  13. PLUMMER47

    PLUMMER47

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    All this because someone assumed a crow ate some seed, that he feels is bad. No one knows what actually happened for sure. About the warnings on treated seed.....well with increasing numbers of "special people" , they have to "CYA label" everything to prevent being sued by "special people". Are they as harmful as described ??? Who knows, but I can't remember the last news article about dying animals ( in mass #'s or not) that were proved to have eaten treated seed. I love it when ignorant people buy all this organic stuff and most of them have NO clue on what the rules are that qualify it as organic. Do some research and you'd be greatly surprised, then I want to see if you can actually tell the difference at the store between real organic and the lesser organic......

    Without engineered seed your vegies would be pre "little house on the prarie"