Timeline of How I Lost My Food Plot !

Discussion in 'Whitetail Deer Habitat' started by Marty H, May 19, 2020.

  1. Marty H

    Marty H

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    Got some interesting pictures of my planted food plot today ! Guess I'll watch it this summer but I'll probably be planting again in July ! MFDC4280.jpg MFDC4305.jpg MFDC4306.jpg
     
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  2. huxIIIhammer

    huxIIIhammer

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  3. Hunters Edge

    Hunters Edge

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    I feel your pain, you're not alone and many have lost much more. Think of those with larger plots or even more those relying on its its production for income to support the family and the roof over their heads.

    Good luck on the your plot hopefully it will drain as fast as it filled with no damage to the seed. If not hope the fall planting does well.
     
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  4. TommyV

    TommyV Premium Member

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    Time to plant some rice!
     
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  5. mcfish

    mcfish

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    I lost most of the 5 1/2 acres I had in too. One plot I may be able to just redo one part but I doubt it.

    Part of the game and a lot of folks have it far worse.
     
  6. Esquire

    Esquire

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  7. fairfax1

    fairfax1 Premium Member

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    A farmer neighbor put a 60acre field into corn last Friday.
    I just looked at it this afternoon. Every inch is under water.

    The river has peaked....at its highpoint this morning at 8am......an hour ago it was still at that peak, which means it will begin declining in the next couple of hours.

    Will still take 10 days ---without rain ----to get near normal.

    Like last year, there may be some planting switches......from corn to beans.
     
  8. mcfish

    mcfish

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    Gosh, I feel for your neighbor.

    I grew up on the farm and I sure don’t miss the sleepless nights worrying about the weather.
     
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  9. fairfax1

    fairfax1 Premium Member

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    Yeah, that risk is real.
    A crop in the field, say 60 acres of corn...worth maybe 35-40k....and it sits there in all weather, 24/7...until you can get it into the wagon.

    Folks simply do not understand that that field they drive by in early September is like a mutual-fund....sitting in the rain.....30-50 grand worth of product. And vulnerable to so many things that can go wrong.
    ............................................................

    Anyway, enough on that stuff.

    The river is going down now. The cubic feet per second--cfps---has declined 7% since 8am this morning.
    And the graphed river height flattened and is now turning slightly downward.
    Per the USGS guages.

    The week before we fretted a hard late frost.
    A week later we fret drowned seedings.....and .fresh tilled ground eroding under water-with-velocity.

    And covid too?
     
  10. fairfax1

    fairfax1 Premium Member

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    Just following up on last night's post.

    The river on my farm is receding at its pace. Of all the years of watching those USGS guages the one thing I think I know is that the basin fills really really quickly.......12+", 24+" in a day.........but it drains very very slowly.

    With this recent event it went up 51" from Saturday morning to Tuesday morning. It will now recede (with no more rain) at the rate of about 1 or 2" per day until it gets down into it's summer range.

    As of 8AM this morning....Wednesday ..... the height has declined by 2" from 8AM yesterday, the cfps has declined 13%.

    So there is encouragement. And the sun is shining.
    ...................................................


    Prayers for those poor Midlanders.



    ps...... just a comment on the 'slow drain'.
    What all of the rivers draining into Lake Michigan are experiencing is a full bathtub. Meaning, L.Michigan is at near record highs.
    It follows then, that the tributaries pouring into the lake are finding high-water resistance.....and thus they back up....and their tributaries back up....and the tributaries to their tributaries, etc. etc.
     
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  11. Dantana

    Dantana

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    Saginaw Bay is at or near its historical high water levels. Definitely the highest I have ever seen it. There is simply no where for the flood water from the Tittabawasee/Saginaw rivers to go.
     
  12. fairfax1

    fairfax1 Premium Member

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    Yupper.
    One can go to the USGS Water-Data site for whatever river most impacts your ground. It gives you cubic-feet-per-second flow volume, and the river's height (depth?) where the gauge is located. Those metrics are available to you 24/7/365....it is online, and it is real-time.

    https://waterdata.usgs.gov/mi/nwis/current/?type=flow

    I've watched my river every day on the website for 20+years. It takes a period of time to, ah, 'internalize' what XX-inches mean at what time of the year. But, in time, one gets a feel for it.

    OK, with that said, for my river today......it is very very slowly going down. Perhaps, the slowest 'drain' that I've ever seen. The river...which went up 50+ inches in two days.....has gone down 5 inches in 4 days.

    And, I believe, that is because of what Dantana notes ---- there's no place for this excess water to drain to.

    I'm in the Lake Michigan drainage of Michigan, specifically, the Grand River. The Grand is very very high. A drive along Grand River Trail will show you how much water is now out of the banks. And that's because the Grand is backing up at the Grand Haven outlet...because the Grand water meets an already high water level of the lake.

    I anticipate it will be 2 or 3 weeks before my tributary reaches a 'normal' June level. And that's if we have no more water-bombs.