The Value Of A Simple Airgun

Discussion in 'Air Guns' started by Perferator, Aug 13, 2019.

  1. Perferator

    Perferator

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    As so many other boys I grew up shooting an airgun. At the age of 11 I purchased a Daisy BB pistol and it was game on.

    Those early days of shooting taught me many valuable lessons. Here it is 50 years later and still seeing the value, fun, and usefulness in owning a basic break barrel .177 pellet gun. For pest control to teaching my grandkids, there will always be a place in my life and cabinet for an airgun.
     
  2. sureshot006

    sureshot006 Staff Member Mod

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    I had a daisy 880. Well, a couple of them because the seal wore out and they would not pump anymore. Pretty darn accurate. I'd hunt grouse with it. Plink em in the head and they just flop a little.
     

  3. Perferator

    Perferator

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    My first was a Daisy pistol that cocked (springer) like a 1911. Low powered but a fun gun that taught me how to handle and shoot a handgun so to this day it comes natural to me. Cant recall the model but it cost me 6.00 and tax. I couldnt afford the CO2, 200. That one I purchased for 20.00 of bus boy money as a 15yr old and became the neighborhood Dirty Harry. That was the one that taught me “point and shoot” habits. Fun days. Can still smell the CO2 and oil fumes.
     
  4. thelastlemming

    thelastlemming

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    My first bb rifle was a Daisy Red Rider that I shot constantly up until my friends dad bought him a Crossman 760 pellet rifle. When I saw the added power of the 760 I had to have one and from there it was game on terrorizing the local starling population.
     
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  5. Luv2hunteup

    Luv2hunteup

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    I purchased a Beeman R1 when Reagan was in office. In time I took off the iron sights and put on a scope. I still see the value in it after all these years. I practice shooting with it off the deck on a regular basis. It keeps my eye hand coordination in tune.
     
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  6. Perferator

    Perferator

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    Here is the 2nd Daisy pistol I bought, a huge upgrade:

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Perferator

    Perferator

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    That 760 was killer. Every boy had to have one. If 10 pumps was max we had to put a few more into it. My grampa had one, it was the airgun all others were compared to.
     
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  8. mjh4

    mjh4

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    The 760 was a red squirrel and black birds worse nightmare. At 10 years old I would put a pellet in that sucker and I was off big game hunting! (Lol)


    Sent from my iPhone using Michigan Sportsman
     
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  9. ESOX

    ESOX Staff Member Super Mod Mod

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    My brother had that same pistol. Very well made.
    My first BBgun was a spring powered Daisy you unscrewed the magazine and muzzle insert and loaded it.
    Another brother had a Daisyy 1894.
     
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  10. Lightfoot

    Lightfoot

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    I've only had a few over the years.
    Daisy bb gun configured like a winchester lever action 30-30. (long gone)
    Crossman 160 (I eventually gave to a friend.)
    Beeman Webley Vulcan 2 that I sold to buy an Orvis fly rod (still have).
    Red Ryder (threw away)
    M-rod in .22 (still have)

    My friends had Benjamins, Sheridens and 760's. The Sheriden Silver streaks (.20) were the cats meow back in the days. None of the above however, even remotely, compare to the m-rod I have now. Ammo for the 760's graduated from bb's to pellets to bb/pellet combo to pellet/coat hanger combo.

    The funny thing is my dad gave me a ruger 10/22 in 1968 (age 6) but I didn't get my first bb gun until 1970 (age 8).

    As mentioned in another post, I will burn in tweety bird hell some day.
     
  11. Perferator

    Perferator

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    “Tweety bird hell”. :lol:

    I was shooting a .22 (Nylon 66) 5 years before my first Daisy pistol. Those were fun days.

    So tell me about the coat hanger trick.
     
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  12. Lightfoot

    Lightfoot

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    Load up a pellet and slide a short 3-4 inch piece of coat hanger down the barrel. It doesn't fly very true but worked well close up on...ummmm......ummmmm....feral critters.....yeah those. The thorns from palm trees flew great if you feathered the tail end of them.

    A wrist rocket contributed heavily to my avian damnation.
     
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  13. Perferator

    Perferator

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    Kinda figured that was the game.
     
  14. sureshot006

    sureshot006 Staff Member Mod

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    Those 20 cal still take care of business.
    20131216_184710.jpg 20131216_184647.jpg 20190727_144527.jpg
     
  15. Lazy K

    Lazy K

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    My younger brother had the 760 and had the big gun....766! Our game in the summer was to leave the barn doors wide open for a while then run in and shut them real quick. Not a sparrow would make it out alive no matter how many times you missed. The family Lab loved that game as much as we did. Guilty as charged.
     
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