The physics of a trolled fishing line.

Discussion in 'Tips and Tricks' started by scubajay, Mar 4, 2018.

  1. scubajay

    scubajay

    Messages:
    406
    Likes Received:
    377
    Location:
    Macomb County

    Attached Files:

    fishinthed likes this.
  2. frenchriver1

    frenchriver1 Mr. Flatfish Premium Member

    Messages:
    6,378
    Likes Received:
    1,155
    Location:
    Brighton
    You know, I didn't even think of this article last time I trolled out a flatfish.

    But seriously, great academic study but not sure many fishermen get into that level of detail. I believe most serious trollers use charts readily available on line.
     

  3. scubajay

    scubajay

    Messages:
    406
    Likes Received:
    377
    Location:
    Macomb County
    I'm sure you're correct that most folks don't consider that level of detail; however, as a an engineering physicist myself, I find the fact that somebody wrote a paper on this subject fascinating.

    Scubajay Ph.D.
     
    -Axiom- and frenchriver1 like this.
  4. piketroller

    piketroller

    Messages:
    664
    Likes Received:
    520
    Location:
    The Thumb’s Scrotum
    The one I’d like to see is on the relative movement of a jig near the bottom in a deep, fast river like SCR or the D. With everyone so paranoid about staying vertical really meaning the line is vertical at its entry point into the water. If the river was a perfect laminar flow, the current speed near the bottom is a good bit slower than the surface for open channel flow. A verticsl pull with the rod tip will have a downstream component in addition to the magnitude of the current velocity at the jig. Also jig weight would play into what the actual trajectory of the jig looks like. It would be real interesting if the math said something like the motion is essentially the same for 1/2 oz to 3 oz of weight and the argument for which weight is really the best could be shown to be insignificant. It’s been a couple years since I published a paper so I might get around to writing it someday.
     
    fishinthed likes this.
  5. fishinthed

    fishinthed

    Messages:
    1,426
    Likes Received:
    152
    Location:
    Garden City, MI
    Interesting article. I'm a bit rusty on the math. Of course the diving characteristics or drag characteristics of the lure itself would have quite an effect. I "eyeball" the angle of the line when running a new bait to get an idea of how much line to let out to get the desired depth.
     
  6. fishinthed

    fishinthed

    Messages:
    1,426
    Likes Received:
    152
    Location:
    Garden City, MI
    I hear ya, piketroller. As best I understand the real idea is to keep a tight line and contact with the bait, which is simply easier to do without snagging if vertical at the entry point. Is this correct? I'm rather a newb at walleye jigging.
     
  7. piketroller

    piketroller

    Messages:
    664
    Likes Received:
    520
    Location:
    The Thumb’s Scrotum
    Yeah, that’s the jist of it. This spring I’m going to be learning it as I go on the SCR.
     
    fishinthed likes this.
  8. fishinthed

    fishinthed

    Messages:
    1,426
    Likes Received:
    152
    Location:
    Garden City, MI
    That's what logic tells me. So I focus on keeping a tight line with maximum "feel", above all, rather than being concerned so much about how vertical the line is. Which interestingly I've found way easier to do jigging Bondy baits for muskies. Just that there ain't nearly the same density of fish, but man, it's fun to catch one jigging!