Territorialism and how I think we could quell it

Discussion in 'Michigan Whitetail Deer Hunting' started by Sam22, Aug 29, 2020.

  1. I hunt public land a fair amount and I scout a lot more than I hunt. I have seen an increase in the public land pressure around me in the last couple years. I see more treestands and blinds left up now than ever. The permanent stands will usually steer me away, and I know they fend off most guys.

    The concept of one public land hunter staking claim on a spot over another is an issue. I don't think Michigan hunters should be allowed to leave up an unlimited numbers of stands through the season anymore. We all have the same amount of privilege to hunt any spot. Wisconsin has already eliminated season long stands.

    I would like to see some sort of stand tags sold by the DNR. They would be limited to a certain number per person. They would have name and contact info on them. If the stand was left up without a tag, or with an outdated tag it would be clearly in violation. It could be removed or at least I would be more inclined to ignore it. It would also provide another revenue stream for the DNR.

    I can think of more than one spot that I badly want to hunt, but there is always someone's stuff there. This would be the most fair way I can think of to control territorialism.

    What do you guys think? How does territorialism effect where you hunt? How else do you think it could be dealt with?

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
     
  2. monkman

    monkman

    Messages:
    619
    Likes Received:
    327
    Location:
    Northern Mi
    I hunt primarily public land also but I don't know about purchasing separate tags for a tree stand. Tree stands are already required to have ID's on them. If someone is hunting my spot, I just move to a different spot. It is public land after all so first come first serve.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
     

  3. bowhunter426

    bowhunter426

    Messages:
    6,086
    Likes Received:
    12,853
    Location:
    West Michigan
    I don't let a stand deter me from hunting an area. I will occasionally leave a stand for a few days if I found a good area. I do wish the law about treestands left after a certain date was updated to define them as litter.
     
  4. bradym54

    bradym54

    Messages:
    735
    Likes Received:
    542
    Location:
    SE Michigan
    Hard pass on tree stand tags. I will give another hunter some space if I see he is hunting an area that day but a hung stand means nothing to me. I assume most stands get hunted only on the opener of rifle so the odds of me running into the other guy is slim. Any stand I can see evidence of being hunted hard I assume he has already blew out the area and will avoid it.
     
  5. 22 Chuck

    22 Chuck

    Messages:
    2,696
    Likes Received:
    458
    Location:
    Montmorency Co, MI
    But what if it is just a stand that has been there since last season?? I thought they had to be removed by certain date. I guess just ground blinds. I need to review.

    After all as you noted "...it is public land, first come first serve." How long does a 'reservation' hold?? Some seem to think from season to season.

    As others mentioned-after a date all become litter. My son called the fish cop on a stand w/ no name. Cop came and removed it-state land.
     
    shooter and Sam22 like this.
  6. I hear what you guys are saying, and I am the same way. I work around it, and don't let it ruin my day. However, territorialism is a real problem. Some people manage to bully other people out without having a stand up at all. It is a problem, and this was just one way I thought we could combat it.

    I would like to hear a COs perspective of the trouble with territorialism.

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
     
  7. Wild Thing

    Wild Thing

    Messages:
    10,495
    Likes Received:
    28,050
    Location:
    Iron Mountain
    This would be highly unusual. Official correspondence with the DNR a couple of years ago (and posted here on a previous thread) said they will not remove the stands. If you give them the GPS coordinates they may try to catch someone in the stand and then write a ticket and ask them to remove it.

    Sadly, this is why teritorialism is such an issue. There is no (or very little) enforcement on the law requiring stands to be removed at the end of the season.
     
  8. Liver and Onions

    Liver and Onions

    Messages:
    18,899
    Likes Received:
    8,721
    Location:
    Mi.
    Totally agree. The day after they are up past the last legal day they become fair game for anyone to take down.
    How many thousands are left up year-round in the state ?

    L & O
     
  9. bowhunter426

    bowhunter426

    Messages:
    6,086
    Likes Received:
    12,853
    Location:
    West Michigan
    Found 17 on a 40 acre piece in March. Bet I could sell them for $15 a piece if I could legally take them down
     
    Sam22 likes this.
  10. 22 Chuck

    22 Chuck

    Messages:
    2,696
    Likes Received:
    458
    Location:
    Montmorency Co, MI
    Wonder how long those 17 had been up??

    They might not all be safe to use, depending??

    I knlw people that put em up one weekend and by the next they were gone. They had been cabled besides. As Ive said before-some must drive around w/ bolt cutters in the trunk/truck. In the big city that would be considered bugluary tools.
     
    Wild Thing likes this.
  11. buggs

    buggs

    Messages:
    2,731
    Likes Received:
    3,258
    Looking back over years, hunting state or federal land produced far fewer issues for our old crew relating to "territorialism" - and most other issues in general, then did "territorial" neighbors on shared boundaries on private land. The vast majority of hunters that I've met on public lands were overwhelmingly decent people, but I can't say the same for a good handful of the private land folks. I hope - for the sake of future small property owners, that our experiences, mainly as we all got older, were the exception and not the rule.
    My advice has always been never buy a hunting property until/unless you assert a 100% effort into ascertaining your neighbors hunting ethics. Its the single most important factor you should consider when buying hunting property.
     
  12. Forest Meister

    Forest Meister

    Messages:
    3,897
    Likes Received:
    8,076
    Location:
    EUP
    Great advice. Due diligence is always appropriate but the caveat to that is...in two years the best neighbor in the world sells to a less than great neighbor and all your research is down the tubes. Since we don't have a crystal ball, I guess it is what it is.

    'bout the only cure for worrying about nasty neighbor - fence sitters on small properties is to not be a small landowner. Win the lotto and buy enough property in the SLP so that no matter where the neighbors sit it won't matter...or spend a lot less and get a 40 or more in the UP where you might never even hear a shot other than during the first week. FM
     
  13. slabstar

    slabstar

    Messages:
    3,024
    Likes Received:
    2,333
    Location:
    Attica MI
    you are correct, claiming is a huge issue on public land. down here in southern mi the state parcels are small and year over year claiming is rampant on EVERY parcel. the dnr not addressing this elephant in the room has made it worse. i once suggested daily stand use only. not allowing all year stands. i am not a fan of your suggestion but i understand the issue. even if a new law was made, i doubt it would get enforced, similar to the lack of current enforcement.
    allowing year over year stands to be removed by anyone under the state abandonment law would help. the state allows vehicles left on highways to be recovered under abandonment and vehicles are more expensive than tree stands. if you find a 100 dollar bill on state land, do you have to leave it? NO! treestands should be no exception.
     
  14. buggs

    buggs

    Messages:
    2,731
    Likes Received:
    3,258
    So right you are!!!! Some things are beyond our control. Many stories have been written about the scenario you described. Good luck to you this year, reluctantly, this might be my first year ever I miss the entire season.
     
  15. GVDocHoliday

    GVDocHoliday

    Messages:
    5,369
    Likes Received:
    2,110
    Location:
    Wellston, Just south of the River
    As far as I'm concerned if there's a tree stand up past the required date for it to be taken down and before the date they're allowed to be put up, that's litter. Remove it. There's no law preventing you from doing that.

    I'm on the extreme side, I think all stands and blinds that are used on public land need to be removed everyday. There are states that follow this practice.

    Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk