Streamer Rod

Discussion in 'FlyTyingForums.com, Fly Tying, Trout Fishing' started by Matthew Looby, Jan 30, 2018.

  1. Matthew Looby

    Matthew Looby

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Starting to get ready for some spring time streamer fishing. In the market for a new rod and would like to have a little info before I purchase. Currently use a cheap pretty stiff 2 piece rod. Looking to upgrade. What rods do you guys like to use? Anything to avoid? Pros and cons to rods you guys use?
     
  2. jd4223

    jd4223

    Messages:
    955
    Likes Received:
    996
    If you can afford to buy a new rod,I would get a 10' 7wt from TFO. Put on a Redington Behemoth 7/8 reel($109-$129),add your backing and buy the new Airflo Shovelhead fly line(280grn) designed by Kelly Galloup ($99.00). Right now I'm using a Cabelas 10' 7wt(Traditional)2 piece.
     

  3. Gamechanger

    Gamechanger Premium Member

    Messages:
    753
    Likes Received:
    1,329
    Location:
    Southern Maryland
    Matthew,

    You don't mention what type of water you intend to do your streamer fishing in. The size of the streams/rivers that you intend to fish as well as the average size of the fish you intend to catch certainly have a lot to do with equipment selection.
     
  4. Matthew Looby

    Matthew Looby

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have a 7/8 weight behemouth that i currently use and love. Do you know of any shops around michigan that have any TFO rods. I have heard good things about them but would like to test one out before purchase.
     
  5. Matthew Looby

    Matthew Looby

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gamechanger, that is a very good point. I usually fish medium to smaller streams for brown trout and bass. I use a 6wt Sage mostly for bass fishing poppers. The rod I would be getting would be for trout. I always hope to catch fish into the mid 20" range, but I mostly catch fish in the mid teens size range.
     
  6. jd4223

    jd4223

    Messages:
    955
    Likes Received:
    996
    You might want to contact Shultz Fly Shop in Ypsi. They would have all the answers you're looking for including being able to test the rods right on the river.
     
    Matthew Looby and Gamechanger like this.
  7. Gamechanger

    Gamechanger Premium Member

    Messages:
    753
    Likes Received:
    1,329
    Location:
    Southern Maryland
    Matthew,

    For larger streams and streamers, the Sage 6wt you have would certainly fill the bill. IMHO, a nice medium action 4wt would round out your arsenal for the smaller streams that you fish. Keep in mind that you can change the characteristics of a fly rod to some extent simply by going up or down in fly line size, so sometimes it pays to invest in a couple of additional fly lines.

    jd4223 gave some great advice in visiting a fly shop, especially if they provide the opportunity to test their rods.

    Good luck in your search - I hope you find what your looking for within your budget.
     
    Matthew Looby likes this.
  8. kzoofisher

    kzoofisher

    Messages:
    3,241
    Likes Received:
    1,318
    I have a TFO and like it a lot but the model has been discontinued. Easy to throw and accurate. If you fish streamers with size 4 hooks or larger I wouldn't go lighter than 5wt and if you like to throw 5" or larger I'd go at least 7wt. I have one dedicated steamer rod, the TFO in 8wt 9', that I use in big water with big flies. In smaller water I use a 6wt most of the time unless I'm running streamers and waiting out a hatch. Then I compromise the streamer casting for a better dry fly rod and adjust my streamers to match. I don't feel I get good hook sets with a lighter, softer rod but I'm not carrying two all day. Besides the shop in Ypsi you can go to Nomad in Lansing or GR and Uncle Jake's in Battle Creek for TFO. The BVK and Clouser are both nice streamer rods with weight and length options to match the water you fish most. Link to dealer locator https://tforods.com/global-dealer-locator/
     
    Matthew Looby likes this.
  9. BeanOFish

    BeanOFish

    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Royal Oak, MI
    For me, for streamers you want as fast of an action, and as stiff of a rod that you feel comfortable throwing. From there the weight of the rod as well as the streamer line you're throwing will largely depend on the size of the streams that your fishing, and the size flies that you intend to throw. I carry 3 streamer rods, 6-8wt, and what I use is largely dependent on the size of the river. Smaller to mid size rivers with slower current the 6wt get most of the action (I have a 200 grain streamer express for my sink tip), mid to larger rivers, as well as faster currents the 7-8wts get thrown (these rods have either a 250 or a 300 grain sink tip on them depending on the river). You'll also want to consider what size flies you're going to throw. If you're planning on throwing mostly flies in the 2-5 range then a 6wt will do the job. But if you want to start throwing bigger and heavier flies that are 5in+ you'll want to look into a 7 or an 8 (especially if the rivers your fish get steelhead and salmon, hooking one a 6wt is fun until they snap your rod).

    I will agree with Kzoo, the BVK's are very nice rods for the price point, and very light weight. I have an 8wt, and it gets thrown quite a bit in the early spring and late fall.
     
    Matthew Looby likes this.
  10. OH-YEAH!!!

    OH-YEAH!!!

    Messages:
    4,405
    Likes Received:
    412
    There are a lot of great rods for all budgets on close out here;

    https://www.sierratradingpost.com/s~fly-rod/

    I’d probably go with the 5 weight Sage Bolt. Normally $650. $329. Perfect action for streamers.

    Or, if you’re on a budget, the Redington Vapen
     
    Matthew Looby likes this.
  11. OH-YEAH!!!

    OH-YEAH!!!

    Messages:
    4,405
    Likes Received:
    412
  12. cordesr1

    cordesr1

    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Rockford
    I started out with the Vapen in 10' 8 wt, It got heavy after a few hours of pounding the banks. I had this as a steelhead rod and tried to make it do double duty. No such luck.

    I picked up a Redington Link 9' 8 weight and it did well, could net believe the difference between the two. Its nice but when i saw the Sage bolts go on sale i couldn't resist. I picked up a 9' 8 weight bolt. The bolt cast amazing on an icy road but that's as far as i've taken it. 80' bombs are effortless. still cant hit the 100' mark.

    I have both an Allan Kraken and Orvis Hydros set up with sink tips. Both are awesome reels.

    I Mostly chuck 4"+ streamers on sink tips on the larger tail waters from a boat.

    I would look for something from a saltwater lineup,
    Fast Action
    9'
    4 piece
    fighting but is nice on a streamer rod.
    I probably wouldn't go below 6 weight. its easier to throw small streamers with a big rod than to try and trow a deceiver or ditch pig on a 5 wt.

    Sierra trading post has the Sage VXP in 9' 8wt for $280, I had planned on getting this till Cabelas had the bolts at $300.


    In the end, the man with the most rods wins.
     
  13. paradise

    paradise

    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Livonia
    I talked with Mike Shultz last month about a 10 wt. and he was recommending TFO. I want to use it for pike and lakers.
     
  14. Boardman Brookies

    Boardman Brookies

    Messages:
    7,158
    Likes Received:
    2,222
    Location:
    Traverse City/Glennie
    I have a dedicated streamer rod. The St Croix Bank Robber. Kelly Gallop designed it. Really like it!
     
    brookies101, unclecrash and carsonr2 like this.
  15. carsonr2

    carsonr2

    Messages:
    593
    Likes Received:
    121
    Location:
    Manistee County, MI
    Same here, my bank robber in 7wt will fling a 250-350 grain line with a 7 inch fly, like nobodies business.

    Overall for fishing streamers I use 3 different lines on separate reels with two different rods dependent upon the type of water.

    I have a 6wt TFO TiCr (discontinued, but an awesome lightweight streamer rod with the correct line) with a rio sinktip that I use for small streams and smallish streamers.

    I use my 7wt bank robber with two separate reels and line weights depending on river size and depth. I have an airflow Gallup streamer max short and a streamer max long. That short line is used on rivers that require some roll-casting, but I still want to present a 7 inch fly. The long is used for larger rivers, such as bigger sections of the Manistee where it is mostly overhand casting.

    I have a TFO BVK 8wt also, but after doing a side x side comparison to the Bank Robber for throwing sinking lines and streamers it is now strictly delegated to throwing hex and mice with a nice weight forward floating line.

    Personally if one is looking at buying a dedicated streamer rod, I wouldn't go below a 6wt. My reasoning is that if one is looking to throw sinking lines and weighted or large streamers going to a 4wt or 5wt defeats the purpose of having a rod that can handle those serious loads.

    In the extremely rare case that I am going to throw a streamer on a 4wt, it is usually a woolly bugger with a fluorocarbon leader on a small creek (Bear Creek above 9 mile road as example), and my intention that day was to fish dries and droppers, hence why I'm out there with a 4wt. If I'm thinking I may need to toss streamers too, I'll have my 6wt along for those small streams.

    Beyond the difficultly in appropriately handling a sinking line and heavier streamer, a lightweight rod (4wt-5wt) with that setup that hooks into a decent fish stacks the cards against the angler. Why not gun-up and make life easier on both your rod and bodies ability to cast the appropriately weighted lines and flies, with a greater chance at landing the fish both quickly and effectively.
     
    Boardman Brookies and kzoofisher like this.