Stock Refinishing

Discussion in 'Rifles' started by Luv2hunteup, Feb 4, 2020.

  1. Luv2hunteup

    Luv2hunteup

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    I have an Accurate Innovation rifle stock I purchased that had been used and abused. No gouges or even deep scratches but what appears to be leather scabbard wear along with handling marks. The forearm did have a repaired crack. The wood is presentation grade. I felt that the beauty could be restored so I’m getting it refinished.

    It was going to be one of my winter projects until I won a silent auction at a fund raising event. The man doing the restoration work said he would take it down to 6,000 grit, I’ve never refinished one past 600 grit. I’m hoping to have it back in my hands by the end of next week. I have high hopes but it’s one I purchased for target and hunting so I will not become a safe queen no matter how pretty it looks.

    For the guys who refinish their furniture, how far do you take the wood down until the finish is applied?
     
  2. Mr. 16 gauge

    Mr. 16 gauge

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    I've done some stock refinishing in the past; used the Birchwood casey 'kits' that have everything needed. I think finest grit sandpaper was 1200, IRRC? Can't say for certain, but I was pleased with the results. I redid the stock on my Mossberg 500, a Stevens 311 20 gauge, and a Marlin Glenfield model 60. I left the stocks (birch0 their natural color after finishing, so they have kind of a 'honey oak' color to them......I was pleased with the results and they have a different "look' than most other firearms. I don't have the 311 anymore, but here is a photo of the Glenfield. I sanded of the branded in squirrels and oak leaves (took a lot of elbow grease), and then got a checkering tool and did some checkering on the pistol grip and fore grip.....turned out O.K. for a first attempt at checkering. marlin.JPG
     

  3. FullQuiver

    FullQuiver

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    Pics up close of your checkering, please I am thinking of doing some myself and seeing yours might give me the courage to try it..
     
  4. MichiFishy

    MichiFishy

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    I've never done a whole gun stock re-finish, just spot repairs. On furniture though, for figured wood or high vis parts of a piece (tops of tables, benches) or any kind of fancy box, i like to take it up to 1500. Rest of the piece maybe 600-800 depending on species and piece.
    It really depends on species, too high on certain species can actually hinder adhesion on the finish. I don't notice a huge difference in the wood after 600, adds some depth, but you can polish your finish (depending on finish) with jewelers rouge or other compounds and really make it sparkle. If thats what youre into.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2020
  5. 9mm Hi-Power

    9mm Hi-Power Premium Member

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    You shouldn't take the stock down anymore than is absolutely necessary to remove remnants of the old finish after stripping the stock. Anymore and you're liable to start altering the finer edges of the stock.

    I've done a ton of stock re-finishing over the years including for two gunsmiths/gunshops. I've done everything from single shot H & Rs' to Krieghoffs and a lot in-between. 6000 grit paper is polishing paper. When applying the first few coats of stock finish you want the wood "rough" enough to absorb a lot of the finish - you don't want the stock glass smooth at that point. I've never taken a stock down to the wood with anything finer than 400/600. But I have used 1500/2000 grit to "polish" the final coats.

    From another site:

    " Designed ( 6000 grit) for craftsmen to replace the use of steel wool, rottenstone or pumice."

    Screen Shot 2020-02-07 at 6.22.31 PM.png

    Good luck with your stock .

    9mm Hi-Power
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2020
  6. Mr. 16 gauge

    Mr. 16 gauge

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    I was directed to use fine steel wool for my stocks (via the directions)......I might have to try the sandpaper if I ever do another stock; that finish looks nice in your photo.

    Fullquiver:
    I'll try and get some pics taken and posted before the end of the weekend.
     
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  7. Mr. 16 gauge

    Mr. 16 gauge

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    Fullquiver:
    Here are some close up photos......sorry for the poor quality.
    checkering2.JPG checkering1.JPG checkering3.JPG checkering4.JPG
    I took the basic form off of my Ruger 10/22.....just did a rubbing with a pencil and paper and then cut it out, placed it on the stock and did the basic outline. I did the faux rosewood tip by using some aqua fortis and a hot metal bar to 'stain' the tip of the stock. Good luck if you decide to give it a try!
     
    Gil Martin, jonnyb and FullQuiver like this.
  8. FullQuiver

    FullQuiver

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    Looks great for a first effort.. I have a Boyd's stock for a rifle I'm putting together and have been contemplating checking it before I finish it..

    What tools did you use and what was the LPI on it.. BTW thanks for posting this..
     
  9. Gil Martin

    Gil Martin

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    Very nice pictures. Thanks for sharing. All the best...
    Gil
     
  10. Mr. 16 gauge

    Mr. 16 gauge

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    Sorry for the late response; I worked 12 hour midnights the past three days.
    I think that the LPI are 22, but I could be mistaken......I got a Dembart checkering tool to do the stock on my late Grandfather's single shot 20 gauge shotgun; it was just a cheap Bioto import, but it looks like they just took a box cutter and cut a patter in the fore arm and pistol grip. I just used the tool and followed the cuts to make some real "checkering". When I did the Glenfield, I bought a 'kit' from Brownell's that had different style cutters, handles, etc. I moved to KY 4 years ago (have since moved back), and I can't remember where I stored the kit to get more details............sorry.