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recycled plastic lures

Discussion in 'Tackle Talk' started by mattman, Apr 16, 2018.

  1. mattman

    mattman

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    I have been doing some research on recycling old/beat up plastic lures by remelting them and pouring them into molds. Just curious if anyone on here does it and if its worth investing in my own equipment to do it.
     
  2. Zkovach1175

    Zkovach1175

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    Never done that but melting one in a hole in your waders is a great field fix.
     
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  3. mattman

    mattman

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    I might have to try that. I do have a couple leaks in my waders
     
  4. Quack Addict

    Quack Addict

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    I don't think remelting and "pouring" the remelted plastic into a mold would work. All the thermoplastics I am familiar with require injection molding. That applies a lot of pressure to push the molten plastic into the mold and pack it out completely so there aren't any voids. Molten plastic is too thick to flow on it's own - a lot loke axle grease - and get any on you at or above melt temperature and you'll be in a world of hurt.

    The only low pressure polymer I'm familiar with that could be poured into a mold isn't a plastic. It's a 2-part thermoset (like epoxy), which means it cannot be remelted. Look up "reaction injection molding", or RIM. It generates a lot of heat when it sets up, possibly enough to wreck a cheap die. The stuff I have worked with in the past had a work time of about 7 seconds, meaning that after parts A&B were mixed, you had about 7 seconds to pour it before it kicked and went solid. But it flowed like water until then. Because of the short work time, it was mixed in a machine head that held A&B separately, then mixed and instantly poured into a die similar to injection molding. That can be tricky because what's left mixed in the machine will kick and plug up the mixing head if not done correctly, or at a fast enough cycle rate to keep it flowing.

    I'd be careful investing much into a DIY plastic molding kit - sounds like a gimmick to pull more dollars out of your wallet than fish out of the lake.
     
  5. mattman

    mattman

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    Thanks for your input. I have seen it done both ways, one injection and one hand pour. I'm just trying to figure out the process of it. I'm not sure the make up of the "plastic" used in these fishing baits but there are plenty of videos on youtube of people melting them in the microwave
     
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  6. Zkovach1175

    Zkovach1175

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    It’s more of a temp fix but crap does it work.
     
  7. LushLife

    LushLife

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    when i was young and poor we used to take bits and pieces of trashed soft plastics and melt them, simply using a lighter, and stick them together to create multi-colored "creatures", like adding skirts and tails to worms - we never caught a whole heck of a lot and I always attributed that to the scent being a turn-off
     
  8. Quack Addict

    Quack Addict

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    Ah, you're talking about the silicone-type soft plastics, like for jigs. I thought your question was about melting hard plastic crank baits, like Hot-N-Tots & Reef Runners.
     
  9. mattman

    mattman

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    sorry I should have added that in the first post about Soft plastic baits. hard baits I agree wouldn't come out too great and I usually don't break a lot of them. on the other hand I go though soft plastics like crazy and just think its a waste to just throw them away