Model 1917 eddystone 30-06 value?

Discussion in 'Firearm Identification/Value' started by pikeman1, Sep 30, 2014.

  1. pikeman1

    pikeman1

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    I have a 1917 eddystone 30-06 with a 3x9 cheap scope on it and I want to sell it, what is this gun worth? It shoots great, wood stock, kinda heavy and has a good kick thats why I'm selling. Gonna get a 243 for my son instead of giving him this as a beginner rifle. Thanks.
     

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  2. Rootsy

    Rootsy

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    Maybe $250 - $300. Value with these guns is in original military form or being able to return them to such. Your photo is not the best but it appears the rear sight wings have been milled off to mount scope and that is the biggest issue. Even if the barrel is unmolested and in great shape you generally have to destroy them to remove them from the receiver as they were machine installed.

    Value really is in the sum of the salvageable parts... Which isn't much after military rifles are sporterized.
     

  3. Gil Martin

    Gil Martin

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    In original military configuration with a decent bore and very good or better overall condition the rifle would be worth perhaps $500 to $800. As a sporterized rifle, I doubt if it would go for more than $200 around here. All the best...
    Gil
     
  4. bucko12pt

    bucko12pt

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    I have the exact same Eddystone sporterized by one of the premier rifle makers in the US, including a custom made stock. He did mine before he was well known, so it didn't cost me much to do the work.

    I paid $ 25 for mine when I pulled it out of a crate in a Gambles store in TC back in the 50's. I agree, the most value is in original condition, but making money off it down the road wasn't why I bought it.

    They are great old guns that are really well built. My friend still buys them when he gets the chance for the action for some if his custom rifles. I've seen him come back from a trip with one, or two actions, with barrel hacksawed off and stock pitched in the trash.

    If it means nothing to you, a few hundred $$ is all it's worth. Mine is wi porch much more to me and will be passed to my son or grandson along with my dad's identical gun, which is a Winchester instead of an Eddystone.
     
  5. CHASINEYES

    CHASINEYES

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    My dad also has an old Eddystone. Has the original stock but the forearm area has been shrtened from the original length. It is actually a very good shooting gun with the right ammo. He bought his dirt cheap long before I was born. It won't ever be sold.
     
  6. bucko12pt

    bucko12pt

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    I remember when I bought mine, there were several crates of them, all brand new and wrapped in cosmoline. They were dirt cheap, $ 25. There must have been tons of them put on the market back then. I think Remington, Winchester, Springfield Armory, Eddystone and maybe other manufacturers all built them, with Eddystone producing the most as I remember.
     
  7. CHASINEYES

    CHASINEYES

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    I'm not very familiar with the history. My dad has rattled off history of these guns and springfield rings a bell, he's like a walking dictionary and history book. Lol Sounds like a lot of guys were using military surplus rifles for deer season in the 50s-60s. .303 british enfields were popular at one time. Lol

    He has an M1 Garand in very nice shape as well. Fun to shoot, but LOUD.
     
  8. junkman

    junkman

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    Instead of getting rid of it Remington makes managed recoil rounds in .30-06.Then when he's older he can switch up to the full strength amo.
     
  9. Rootsy

    Rootsy

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    The actions are tough, you will never hurt it unless you have one heckuva case head separation. If you hand load then put 45 - 47 grains of 4064 or Varget behind a 150 - 168 grain bullet and the recoil will be easily manageable. If the cock on close is an issue there are conversion kits to reverse it to cock on open (like the 1903 / 03A3)

    I have a Remington 1917 that I shoot in CMP GSV competition (Vintage Bolt catagory). I re-barreled it with a Criterion barrel and had Tim Shufflin in Jerome (shuffsparkerizing.com) re-parkerize it. Shoots VERY well. Well enough to win any match I enter if I can aim straight and be consistent.

    After WWII many of the 1903 / 1903A3 / 1903A4 and 1917 bolt guns were sold dirt cheap as surplus and many men had A LOT of experience with them. Therefore A LOT of them were sporterized for hunting, etc. Today they don't command much money but are good bases to re-convert to military form (if not too badly butchered) or turn into faux snipers for CMP Vintage Sniper competition (1903 to make 1903A1 / 1941 Marine Sniper and 1903A3 to make 1903A4 sniper). Which btw is one heckuva fun match held at Camp Perry every year.
     
  10. bucko12pt

    bucko12pt

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    Only issue for kids is they are quite heavy. Mine was cut down dramatically, barrel shortened, new handmade and lighter stock, floor plate straightened, bolt straightened, cock on close reversed. It's still quite heavy, but is a great
    rifle and I'd never sell mine.

    Good point with the lighter loads. My son has my dad's version and he went from a .22 to lighter hand loads that just went bang and worked up to hunting loads.
     
  11. bucko12pt

    bucko12pt

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    Back then, there wasn't the selection of rifles and calibers there are today. The military rifles were popular because they were cheap and easy to sporterize. I remember several big crates full of new rifles when I bought mine.

    30-40 Krag was another popular caliber available back in the day, another ex military rifle. I worked at a Farmers COOP in high school that was a grocery/hardware/feedmill/milk and cherry receiving station and 30-40 Krag was as popular a caliber to have on the shelf as was 30-06.