Livestock abandonment legal question

Discussion in 'Sound Off' started by boomer_x7, Sep 1, 2014.

  1. boomer_x7

    boomer_x7

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    Does anyone know how long before an animal (horse) is considered abandoned? I know we have a few lawyers that hang around here. Anyone willing to let me ask them a few questions on this matter?
     
  2. I'm not a lawyer, but I would think that as long as the animal has access to water, fodder and shelter...it would not be considered abandoned. Just because the owner of the animal, which is his or her property, doesn't check on it everyday doesn't mean it’s abandon.

    Now, if it was/is neglected...such as denied medical attention or starvation issues…then that's a whole different story and set of circumstances.
    [/COLOR]
    If you could please define what makes you think this animal is abandon...that would help some.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 30, 2015

  3. boomer_x7

    boomer_x7

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    Its an issue where one person claims to own the animal (claims to have proof of purchase but havnt seen it) but hasnt had anything to do with it in a year. Basically they left the household (not a divorse) and left the animal. The person still living there has taken care of the animal but the person claiming ownership has not done anything for or about the animal. (physically or finacially).

    I know with other property there is an amount of time before it is considered abandoned. Not sure with animals especially horses as their seems to always be special laws for horses...
     
  4. bigcountrysg

    bigcountrysg

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    Is it a horse or livestock? Horses fall under different laws than livestock.

    From what it sounds like to me, is the person that has been boarding the horse now has interest in the horse. If the actual owner did not pay for boarding over this year period then the person who has boarded the horse has a vested interest.

    The person boarding the horse can refuse the release of the horse to the owner til the boarding costs are covered.

    You can obtain boarding fees for your area through google search. In with the boarding fee you can include vet bills and feed bills and ferrier costs. As well as any other costs that were endured by the person boarding the animal.

    This is a civil dispute and the person claiming to be the owner would have to file in court. Or the person boarding the horse can file. But the person boarding the horse better have all the receipts to show all the costs that was paid and is now owed by the claiming to be owner.


    Posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire
     
  5. I believe a lot of this would apply. However, it would certainly depend on the agreement made between to two folks involved, whether it be verbal or written.

    It would be like my daughter moving out and saying, dad can you take care of my horse while I find another place to board him (and not mentioning any time frame)...and I agree...if that is the case...then I have agreed to that arrangement. Sure, if a year or so went by and my daughter made no headway on finding another spot for her horse...I might get upset and say the horse is mine...but I believe in court, if a verbal agreement was made that I watch over her horse in the interim...then it would still be her horse.

    Now, if she agreed to pay for food and supplies...and didn't...that would be a whole different story.

    Hopefully an attorney chimes in and gets this straightenn out for you.
     
  6. boomer_x7

    boomer_x7

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    To keep it short-The 2 people involved where together. (2 years tops) They had a kid but were never married. the horses (actually 3 horses) where purchased while they where together. From my understanding the man paid for them but the receipt was in her name. Anyhow they split and she left the horses. Never filed any kind of law suit, report ect. She hasnt had anything to do with the horses at all for over a year. The man has been feeding and caring for them. He can no longer afford to feed them and gave them to us. She found out and now claims that they are hers and that she has the receipt for them ect.... (i dont think she does). Anyhow lets say she can prove she bought them, does this fall under abandonment means there was no arrangement made when she left and has made no attempt to get them let alone care or pay for them?
     
  7. sjk984

    sjk984

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    Charge her liberally for any little thing u did for the horses and see what she does
     
  8. wintrrun

    wintrrun Banned

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    If she jetted he can go after her, as her stating she was the owner for maintenenace and care of the animals as a provider.
    He can sue her in a civil preceding ( small claims court ) and make sure he has receipts for the timeline she has been gone.
    You can also do the same.
    I would get ahold of the animal control officer, have them come out and state what's going on with the animals.
    Receipt or no receipt, she's a dead beat horses momma and that's not going to look good in the officer or courts eyes.
     
  9. Wendy

    Wendy

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    The BF should have sent her a bill with conditions that if he was not reimbursed for their care (including some wage) within a certain amount of time, or removed them from his property/care, that he would re-home them buy such and such time. Get it all in writing!