Line for Spey Rod

Discussion in 'FlyTyingForums.com, Fly Tying, Trout Fishing' started by Rasputin, Feb 28, 2018.

  1. Rasputin

    Rasputin Premium Member

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    I'm building a spey rod this winter, not sure I know how to cast it, but I'm not worried about that. I'm building it because that method of casting looks like it will be much easier on my tennis elbow than standard fly rod.

    What I am worried about is what line I should put on it. I get very confused in general when I see all the choices and variations in fly lines, and specific to the options available for spey lines, I have no idea how to determine which option is right for me. if any one has the ability to describe how to shop for one I would be grateful. I'm concerned that the wrong line will lead to frustration, and nobody wants that. Thanks for any advice
     
  2. flyrodder46

    flyrodder46

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    I went through the same dilemma a few years ago when I built my first switch rod, and got started with two handed rods. I was lucky that we had several members in our local club who had a lot of different lines (and we tried a bunch of them to find the right ones). The guys got me started on the right path with my first two lines for that rod. My next rod was totally different even though it was a still a 7wt. it performed differently and required different lines to get the most from the rod and the dummy on the handle end. It will make a difference what your intentions are and the type of fishing you will be doing.

    I noticed you are in Twin Lake, and not far from GR. My suggestion would be to go see Glen Blackwood at Great Lakes in Rockford, he will be able to evaluate your rod, and discuss how you intend to use it. Then you will have several options available to best suit your rod, and your intended use.
     

  3. Rasputin

    Rasputin Premium Member

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    I was hoping you would comment. I will gladly go see Glen. Thanks
     
  4. Honyuk96

    Honyuk96

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    Rod length and rod grain window are the two biggest things. Most critical being the grain window. Once you know your grain window, start there. The rod will not fish well unless it's paired w the proper weight line, then you can play w head length and tip choice. I like heads that don't incorporate a shooting line but thats a personal thing. I really like OPST's newer super short heads. Paired w a good running line and the proper length tip, they are amazing ! Good luck
     
  5. Rasputin

    Rasputin Premium Member

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    Thanks, Honyuk. That was one thing that confused me, the length of the head. Will I cast easier with a longer or shorter head? I think the first goal is to gain some competence, so whatever line is easiest to cast will be a good starting point.
     
  6. Honyuk96

    Honyuk96

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    Shoot for overall length of tip and head being 2 1/2 x rod length. So if you have lets just say a 12' rod, 30' would put you in the ball park. Generally speaking your tips will be 10' ( Imow or Mow ) so in that case you would want a 20' head, or there abouts. 22' heads are common. Whatever line you decide to go w, stick to the overall length being 2 1/2x rod length and you will be in the ball park. I fish an 11'-6" switch. I'm throwing Rio slick shooter running line, an OPST commando head @15' and a 10' tip. Add it up and it's in the ballpark. Would probably fish even nicer w a 12' OPST tip. I should also add when choosing a head for your rod, the head ONLY weight, is what you want to match to your rods grain window. Do NOT factor in the weight of the tip. I'm assuming you will be most likely, here in Mi, fishing a skagit head of some sort, w sink tips of some sort, using mostly a sustained anchor.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2018
  7. StormyChromer

    StormyChromer

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    I've been using the OPST Commando heads for the last two season and love it.
    I use it on my 7wt switch rod for steelhead and 5wt - 7wt single hand streamer rods for trout.

    Like flyrodder said though, stop by Glen's place if you have a chance. For traditional spey fishing, he knows his stuff!
     
  8. jd4223

    jd4223

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    No matter what type of fishing you plan to do,always take your rod and reel set up to a place that will let you try the line out on your set up before buying. I made the mistake of ordering on line based on my Switch Rod make and length and line recommendation. When I put the line on my reel,I couldn't cast worth crap. I then made the same mistake a second time and was still unable to cast worth a crap. I was not able to return either line. I was out almost $200. I finally took my set up to a fly shop(Schultz in Ypsi) and was set up with the proper line for my outfit. I can cast pretty much 90' of line with hardly any effort. As far as the other 2 lines I bought,I was able to use both of them on an 8wt fly rod with some practice.
     
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  9. Rasputin

    Rasputin Premium Member

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    Sounds like solid advice. Thanks
     
  10. flyrodder46

    flyrodder46

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    I forgot to ask you, what blank are you building?
     
  11. Rasputin

    Rasputin Premium Member

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    That's part of my problem. I have a Fenwick 2 pc. 12 foot blank and the documentation is poor. I'm not sure what the specs are. I think I'll go see Glen when it's done and decide if it will cast or just use it for sucker fishing.:(
     
  12. Honyuk96

    Honyuk96

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    Spey casting requires water loading to form a d loop. Lawn casting at a shop is pretty worthless. You need the water to load the rod.
     
  13. flyrodder46

    flyrodder46

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    Very true, trying to learn to cast you must have water, best if you are standing in it, rather than a boat. However, someone like Glen can evaluate the rod, and at least get him started in the right direction on lines that will work best for the rod.
    When I was getting started with all the different lines, we went to a local river and started trying different lines and weights, and the other guys used my rod. No sense in a novice like me trying to evaluate a rod, it takes someone who understands the feel of the rod and the lines.
     
  14. Honyuk96

    Honyuk96

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    Yes. Bob Braendle is the guy you want to see at Great Lakes Fly Co. he's the man
     
  15. mfs686

    mfs686

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    I just bought a 4wt Micro Spey rod and Corey told me to wait until it warms up and then we will try several Skagit and Scandi lines to see which one works best. It's great having the Huron right behind the shop.
     
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