I’m new here! Where to start?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Tail-Chaser, Dec 21, 2018.

  1. Tail-Chaser

    Tail-Chaser

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    I have almost 1000 cases I’ve collected over the years and think this might be the year I finally pull the trigger on getting into reloading. What do I need to get started? I’ve been looking at the hornaday lock-n-load kit? Right or wrong? What else might I need to get started?
     
  2. Tilden Hunter

    Tilden Hunter

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    Before you buy anything else get the Sierra, Speer, or Hornady reloading manual. Read the "how to" section. I think the Sierra manual does the best job at this part, but all are adequate. Some of it might not make sense until you start reloading, so re-read it after you've reloaded for a while. The second thing you should get is a good 0 - 6" or 0 - 8" caliper.

    I'm not sure what is in the Hornady kit. You will need a press, dies, powder scale, powder measure, priming tool of some sort, and loading blocks. I also consider L. E. Wilson case length gages indispensable, but most reloaders don't use them. This will get you going.

    What cartridges do you plan on reloading? Some are easier than others.
     
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  3. Tail-Chaser

    Tail-Chaser

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    Mostly 7mm rem mag and 308 some 243.
     
  4. Tilden Hunter

    Tilden Hunter

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    308 is easy to make accurate loads for. I've never reloaded the other two. One other thing you'll need is some way to trim cases. The Lee trimmer in a drill works great, and is cheap.
     
  5. 300BLK

    300BLK

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    If you are primarily going to load lower volume rifle cartridges, I would go with a turret press. By high volume, I mean loading 500 rounds plus a week.

    The turret-style press will allow you to set up multiple dies on a turret, and rotate the next operation/die into place. Clicks right into place with a detent. It's faster than a single stage.

     
  6. Tilden Hunter

    Tilden Hunter

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    Save reloading the 7mm Rem Mag until you're comfortable with the other two. The fit between factory ammo dims and chamber dims requires a little more care to avoid setting back the shoulder too far on belted mag cases like the 7mm.
     
  7. dogjaw

    dogjaw

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    Good advice. Buy a manual and / or download info from reputable sites like powder and bullet manufacturers before buying powder and primers so you know what to buy and use.
     
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  8. Newcub

    Newcub

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    I would not recommend a turret press for a newbie.
     
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  9. Gil Martin

    Gil Martin

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    I agree with these good folks and would recommend getting one or more reloading manual and read them. My preference is for the Lyman reloading manual, but I also have Hornady, Speer, Sierra and Nosler manuals and refer to them. It might be a good idea to find a friend or relative who reloads and get some one-on-one reloading instructions. All the best...
    Gil
     
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  10. OnHoPr

    OnHoPr

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    Yea, I agree with most of what has been stated, except for the turret press, single stage for newbie. I didn't see that you mentioned a 223 or 9mm or any other high feed shootin rounds. Heck, I would not even let the barrel get hot on the 7mm. Read a number of books as the way they're are written differently might give you a better understanding of the same process. A few other things would be a lube pad if you don't spray, a case neck brush, a bullet puller. There is a few other little things as well, like a primer pocket cleaning tool.

    Also, if you are reloading for you OWN rifles you should be able to just neck size anyways being that your cases will be fireformed from that point. If you are given or pick up brass then you might have to full length size. You might or should go online to look at a few beginner reloading steps. But, there can be, according to my opinion, somewhat bad instruction. For example, if you look at an older Lee case prep vid demo you see them putting about a pea size glob of case lube in the case neck, NO NO, just a faint brush in and out. You will also find all kinds of idiosyncrasies and styles of reloaders, so keep that in mind.
     
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  11. cotote wacker

    cotote wacker

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    Would recommend starting with a single stage press, a good choice is a Hornady or RCBS, my first choice would be RCBS, I have several. I started reloading 48 years ago with a RCBS Rock Chucker single stage. It's still in use today and has loaded over 100'000 rounds.
    Unless you are going to shoot 1000's of rounds a single stage will serve you well and are the strongest made. Able to reform and resize any case with ease. If you wanted to load large volume Dillon 550 are 650 are the way to go.

    Here's a couple good choices to get started....shop around now that times are good getting equipment and components is easy...look for sales and free shipping....
    https://www.midwayusa.com/product/749997/hornady-lock-n-load-classic-single-stage-press-kit

    https://www.midwayusa.com/product/937051/rcbs-rock-chucker-supreme-master-single-stage-press-kit

    I have a couple hundred dies made by several manufactures my first choice is Hornady Custom Grade New Dimension, the best for the money. There Full Length Sizer Die features a Zip Spindle also the floating bullet alignment sleeve and stem in the Seating Die, improve bullet seating and accuracy by pre-aligning the bullet and case before seating.
     
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  12. DRR324

    DRR324

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  13. 2muchgun

    2muchgun

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    I normally would recommend the RCBS starter kid. And starting out by buying the absolute best stuff you can afford right now. Only because it will cost you more to replace it later. Anyone who gets into reloading seriously, always ends up wanting to upgrade their equipment.

    I use mostly all RCBS equipment, with a Lee Classic turret press accompanying my Rock Chukker Supreme. But I prefer Redding dies to all others. RCBS dies are fine also most of the time. Even have a few Lees, but mostly just like their factory crimp dies now.
    Hornady dies were a mess for years, and I wouldn’t use them. The names changed and so did the designs. Many of reloaders, not just myself, would not touch them. To be fair, I bought a set of recently made Hornadys for my 450 Bushmaster, and they worked great. So maybe Hornady finally got things right. Not sure.
    All this said, I really do not see how you could go wrong purchasing DRRs stuff above for $500. If I were you I would jump on it. Add a single stage press at some point and rock on......
     
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  14. amon

    amon

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    I disagree with my compatriots. A turret press is completely safe for a newbie reloading rifle cartridges. The danger of a progressive press is that one can double charge a round. That’s not really possible with a rifle case, assuming you are using rifle powder.
    Get a Lee turret press and use Lee or RCBS dies. Get a Franklin trimmer/reamer/pocket cleaner. A hand primer will work. An old corn cob tumbler works great. Hornady or Speer bullets are cheap and accurate. Sort your brass. You can load the .308 and the .243 with Varget and the 7mm with H4831 or H1000.
    Off to the races.
    PM me if you want to BS, i’ll be glad to help you get started.
     
  15. MSUICEMAN

    MSUICEMAN

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    for 7mm rem mag, I would probably either go heavy duty turret press like a redding, rcbs, or (though I don't care for them much personally) Lyman.

    i'd still probably operate it as a single station press just that all my dies once they are adjusted correctly stay in the turret head and are easy to change to the next station without die removal. my process would look something like:

    Clean/lube (off press)
    Size. (you may prime at this stage also, just be careful when trimming)
    Trim, debur (off press)
    Prime (on or off press)
    Charge (on of off press, for rifle I typically do off press except for range plinking fodder)
    Seat
    Crimp (if necessary/wanted, most my loads do not need it, though AR stuff gets a slide crimp if there is a cannelure).