How to Center pin?

Discussion in 'Center Pin Fishing' started by Duck-Hunter, Mar 27, 2006.

  1. Speyday

    Speyday

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    Note that the "ant swivel" you hear mentioned is VERY tiny. A normal size swivel is thrown in for comparison. Also note that in trout streams, or in tiny steelhead waters, you can get teeny and stealthy with really dinky floats and light lines. (For example: I am planning on doing some trout fishing out west with shorter rod, lighter lines, and a "miniaturized" rig.)

    The floats with the gram weight printed on them are drennans. For floats that are rigged with surgical tubing, the setup is obvious. Other floats, like the one below, are designed as slip floats. No worry. just slip your line thru and peg it in place with a toothpick, as shown. Drennans are expensive, but in clear waters that clear float can be an advantage......p.s. thanks to Eggsniffer for finally getting me off my duff and showing me how to post pics...that was LONG overdue![​IMG]
     
  2. Oldgrandman

    Oldgrandman Woods and Water Rat Premium Member

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    Thanks for the sticky. After a couple requests for answers went unanswered this great information.
     

  3. Frogfish01

    Frogfish01 Guest

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    What brands or models do you guys suggest for a reel and rod?
     
  4. UBDSLO1

    UBDSLO1

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    It all depends on what price range you want to fish with. I have a St. Croix Wild river, 11' 6" and a Raven SST3 Titanium center pin. Rod was I think around $130 and the pin was $260.
    If it was me, I don't think that I would want to "cheap" out on the pin. From what I have read, good start-up is the key and you want a bearing reel, not a bushing reel. I'm not an expert on this, this is my first year pinning.
    My next float rod is either going to be a custom tied one, or I'm going to get the new Lamiglas float models that came out.
     
  5. Frogfish01

    Frogfish01 Guest

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    Is mooching and centerpinning the same thing?
     
  6. Hex4steel

    Hex4steel

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    Frog-Although I am not familiar with it, I believe Mooching is some kind of western derived technique in trolling for salmon.

    Reply to Duck Hunter,

    Are you familiar with river steelheading.......and/or salmon fishing???


    If not, I suggest trying an easier form of fishing and learning the water before purchasing an expensive pin rig. It's very easy to get frustrated learning how to fish the rig while learning to read water. You can get just as good of a drift in any medium to smaller size river using a spinning outfit. The longer rods typically used in centerpinning is what assists (keeps your line out of the water) your drifting, for the most. I know guys that don't spend the money on pins because they catch just as many fish us "GQ" pinners.

    If you are, and plan on purchasing a pin rig, I would suggest an okuma sheffield to learn with and any rod upwards of 10.5 feet. I purchased a sheffield about 3 years ago and still haven't upgraded. This is mostly due to funds :mad: but I dont think I would catch a greater number of fish. Ive had the same 13ft Avid and haven't built anything else in those 3 years. Gets er' dun!

    'Hollister
     
  7. Lightline

    Lightline Guest

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    I'm new to center pinning myself. I was having a lot of trouble with line twist. I contacted my reel manufacturer about it. He wrote that you need a good quality swivel between your main line and shot line. as you guys know. However, he also said that the swivel will not work properly with a lot of strain on it. He said to swing your line up and grab the bottom ring of the swivel and push up a little to take the strain off. You will see the float spin as the line untwists. I tried it and it works great. Excuse me if this has already been discussed, as I didn't take time to read the whole thread.
     
  8. BuckNuttz

    BuckNuttz

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    HUH, sounds like a pretty interesting way of fishing.
     
  9. Steelheadfred08

    Steelheadfred08

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    You might want to check float fishing connection.com. It is Ohio based but has lots of good info and gear reviews.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2009
  10. Flyfisher

    Flyfisher

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    If you learn how to cast properly, ie off the reel, then line twist will never be a problem. A bump, pull, wallis, or BC cast all come off the reel, with the spool spinning instead of the line coming off the side of the reel. Think baitcaster (revolving spool) and your twisting problems will be over. The key is to get the reel spinning before the line starts to come off the spool.
     
  11. TheUrbanMustache

    TheUrbanMustache Guest

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    i feel those reviews are biased based on whether or not they got the gear for free. not a good place for gear reviews IMO.
     
  12. Steelmon

    Steelmon

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    Has anyone here, ever used a Cortland Endurance Float Rod. I saw a 13ft. and it looked like felt like a nice rod at $170.00.
     
  13. Frogpoopin

    Frogpoopin

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    go hit up the lill dipper, they have a set up over there for 1/2 of that
     
  14. fredaevans

    fredaevans Guest

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    'Home River' is the upper Rogue in Southern Oregon and for the majority of the summer (as is the North Umpqua) 'fly fishing only.' You can use a float rod/spinning rod with a float, but ANYTHING below that (save for the fly(s)) must not contain any additional weight (split shot as an example).

    Local store has 'weighted floats, 1/2 and 1 oz, as well as totally unweighted, which would be 'useless' at this time of the year.

    1st question:
    New rod is rigged with 30# 'hydro-float' P-line (rod is 'mono-rated' for 2-10 pounds) ... is this too heavy?

    2nd question:
    For 50-75 foot casts which of the weighted floats (weighed flies below) would you recommend?

    3rd question:
    Dear God! Where do I begin???????:SHOCKED:

    fae
     
  15. Flyfisher

    Flyfisher

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    Make sure you run a lighter leader (6lb-10lb) and you should be fine. From a managability standpoint, I prefer 15lb-20lb Hydrofloat.

    1/2 oz should be more than adequate.

    Personally, I would look for rivers that allow for weight below the float and bait, or at least jigs/rubber eggs. But a double fly rig, weighted egg fly and stonefly nymph may do the trick for you. I understand the Rogue gets a lot of "half-pounders" (small steelhead), that are quite aggressive and act a lot like stream trout.