Hinging Maples

Discussion in 'Whitetail Deer Habitat' started by AduntonLSSU, Feb 1, 2016.

  1. AduntonLSSU

    AduntonLSSU

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    How do you get tall maples (50'-60') with about a 8"DBH that only have branches at the top to come down slow enough for a successful hinge? I tried using other trees to slow them down but had limited success. They all seemed to rip right off the stump.
     
  2. gunfun13

    gunfun13

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    Cutting less in conjunction with wedges and a come along helps. Landing them on top of other trees helps. But sometimes it just is what it is and can't be prevented. Don't fret, you're still making progress and opening canopy...just keep moving forward. If I can lift those trees I usually notch the top of the stump and set in on top.
     

  3. Thirty pointer

    Thirty pointer Premium Member

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    Reminds me of when I tried to hinge 10 in popular that were about 60 ft tall they popped off and hit the ground so hard all the branches fell off .but it did open things up .
     
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  4. bioactive

    bioactive Tornado Jim Premium Member

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    The main thing is to keep enough wood in the hinge. Do not cut so far through that the tree falls on its own. Stop, even if it is forward leaning, and get it to fall with a wedge or a pole. A good approach is to cut from the back side with those that have a slight lean. In other words, cut so it wants to lean back to the saw, but stop before it does, and then force it over with a wedge or pole, brushing it through other trees and aiming it for a top of a tree you have already dropped.

    Here is a short vid on the techniques with maples.

     
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  5. bioactive

    bioactive Tornado Jim Premium Member

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    Poplars are much harder to hold together than maples. It can be done, but not with consistency. And the tree top will not survive in most cases, even if the hinge does hold.
     
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  6. bioactive

    bioactive Tornado Jim Premium Member

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    I agree. Even if you lose maples, letting light in is the main thing.
     
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  7. AduntonLSSU

    AduntonLSSU

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    Bio, I think I've watched that video a hundred times on youtube or in the memebers area of Whitetail Ambush Secrets. I think a lack of experience is my main concern. I tried to wedge them and pull with a pole and brush them through trees but the particular area I was in had a low stem count and the bottom 20 ft was wide open and they would gain speed and bounce on the ground and pop off. I'm definitely not getting under a tree that tall to slow it down with the pole lol. But I am learning from the best and learning as I go. Thanks for the input.
     
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  8. RMH

    RMH Banned Premium Member

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    Consider what Gunfun13 said about landing on top of other tree tops on the ground. Not just brushing against trees on the way down, but landing the on top of previous cut tops.

    You could also lower them slowly with ropes tied off through other nearby trees. The fellows with bigger properties with big areas may not do this but on a small project that you absolutely want the trees attached sometimes you need to get creative.
     
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  9. brokentines

    brokentines

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    It's a lot of work, but you can take a ladder out in the woods and lean it on the tree. Go up as high as you can and tie a rope on the tree. Attach it to a come- along. and another tree as far away as possible. (think leverage). This is a last resort when the wedges/poles won't do it.
     
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  10. bioactive

    bioactive Tornado Jim Premium Member

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    Ladders can be extremely dangerous to use even when attached to the tree with a rope. I have seen too many disasters on youtube.

    Instead of risking life and limb I recommend getting an arborists pole about 16-20 feet long. Put a hook on the end and lift the rope up with a weight on the end. There will almost always be a small limb or knob that you can push it over, then pull over from a distance 2x greater than the height of the tree.

    However, with small (8 inch) maples, I see no reason to go through all that. Every one can be taken to the ground easily by just cutting with the lean or pushing or wedging over.

    The most telling thing from the OP is that the tops are hitting the "ground". To preserve a tree, it should be landed on top of an already cut tree as RMH and others say.

    I would like to see pics from the OP to see how far through the trees are being cut.
     
  11. AduntonLSSU

    AduntonLSSU

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    I will try to remember to take a few pictures next time I am up there.
     
  12. Woodstock

    Woodstock

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    Ladders are dangerous :confused: We have hang on tree stands, ladder sticks, ladder stands etc. that we put up every year. I put up around 2 dozen myself.

    Most anything is dangerous if not used correctly. [​IMG]



    Put the ladder on the tree before you start cutting. Throw a rope over a limb or use a pruning pole to get it around there. The higher you get, the better leverage and control you have. Pull ladder down and stow a long ways away and have way more rope than you need.
    Think, plan and pay attention.

    Three or four of these will handle most any tree that you will need to take down at a reasonable price.
    http://www.amazon.com/Tow-Strap-Reinforced-Loops-Capacity/dp/B00N4IDPZM/ref=sr_1_1?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1454501086&sr=1-1&keywords=2"+tow+straps

    [​IMG]
     
  13. brokentines

    brokentines

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    You could literally take the straps Wookstock is showing and put them on towards the bottom of the tree. Push them up with a pole as high as you can, then cinch them tight to the tree. If you are uncomfortable with a ladder.
     
  14. bioactive

    bioactive Tornado Jim Premium Member

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    Added risk, and a waste of time and effort.

    Go to sherrilltree.com and you will find solutions that do not require hauling a ladder around and climbing up trees to place a rope.

    Placing ladder stands is a risk that requires you to climb it and you can control the risk. There is no reason whatsoever to take the risk of climbing off the ground for an activity that does not require it.

    There are poles and slingshots available to use to get ropes up into trees. No reason whatsoever to ever climb one just to attach a rope.

    Be safe. Don't spend five times the effort and 10 times the risk to do something that can easily be done from the ground.
     
  15. bioactive

    bioactive Tornado Jim Premium Member

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    Sorry but when it comes to member safety I must disagree. Those straps are way way way way way to heavy for the duty you are suggesting using them for. You would have to string a bunch of these together, which are designed with 10,000 lb. pulling strength to pull vehicles. They would be bulky and unwieldy when continuous 1/2 inch rope will do. In fact I use a 1/4 inch high strength rope sold for arborists work that has over 2000 lb. capacity, which is more than is needed to pull properly cut trees down.

    Safety is the number one concern when it comes to cutting trees. The person at the end of the line should be double the tree height away from the tree. (Mechanical means such as pulling with a vehicle should not be used by non-professionals).

    There is no reason whatsoever to climb a tree to place a line. Buy a slingshot or use a pole to lift the line up.

    http://www.sherrilltree.com/sherrilltree-big-shot-standard-kit

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2016
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