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Grayling plan released

Discussion in 'FlyTyingForums.com, Fly Tying, Trout Fishing' started by kzoofisher, Jul 14, 2017.

  1. RonSwanson

    RonSwanson

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    I'm not arguing that we shouldn't. Worst case scenario is that it improves the quality of those streams but the grayling's do not return. That's still a win in my book.

    Just pointing out some of the trappings of restoration science. Various states have taken a lot of nifty approaches to introductions. Stream side farms and "trophy rivers" with various limits on season dates, tackle, and size limits have been very effective at establishing and growing populations of fish.
     
  2. Gamekeeper

    Gamekeeper

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    Unless there is a Khmer Rouge style Brown trout re-education program, they will do as they have always done.

    This is a typical "fool and their money" type effort.

    Grow them in a lake somewhere, dump them in the tribs. Make people buy a stamp to keep them.
     
    mbirdsley likes this.

  3. Ranger Ray

    Ranger Ray Smells like, Victory! Premium Member

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    Well looks like we are going to find out if they can survive. As long as this isn't used to promote restrictions all over the Manistee watershed, I be good with it. Restrictions on graylings themselves, understandable.
     
    -Axiom- likes this.
  4. Gamekeeper

    Gamekeeper

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    Unfortunately, history shows us that there would be no decent fishing if left to the public trust.
    If you are going to have Grayling, you're going to have government involved in it.
    Or some bizarre reinterpretation of the sovereign rights of the Native people's.

    I am only somewhat familiar with the Manistee watershed.
    I know the tribe holds all kinds of land downstream from Highbridge.

    Do they hold much up toward Mesick?
     
  5. DecoySlayer

    DecoySlayer

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    Are Michigan brown trout somehow harder on grayling than those in England and Scotland? How is it that grayling live right along side brown, and sea trout, which are sea run brown trout, without any problem over there? I often could take a limit of trout, and grayling, on the same day on the same stream/river.

    I guess I don't understand.
     
  6. B.Jarvinen

    B.Jarvinen

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    I am guessing the only chance to restore them is in a stream not already hosting the Great Lakes Trout/Salmon species?

    Be that as it may, it seems like this would be easier on a small system Lake Superior stream than anywhere else. Are the U.P. bands taking an interest in this?
     
  7. Gamekeeper

    Gamekeeper

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    You'd have to ask a fisheries person or TU guy for that.
    Upon introduction, Brown trout out competed the Grayling in our rivers.

    What might have changed?

    Why aren't there already Grayling in the streams they are intended to be reintroduced to? There probably were at one time.
    If not, then if it didn't work before, why would it work now?

    Without addressing the original cause for their disappearance, it would seem unlikely to have much success.
     
  8. B.Jarvinen

    B.Jarvinen

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    I thought the Grayling were gone a fair bit before any Brown Trout were ever introduced?
     
  9. DecoySlayer

    DecoySlayer

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    No, that particular invasive species was introduced into Michigan in 1883. The last grayling were removed in the 1930's in a last ditch effort to save them.

    I believe it was primarily loss of habitat, and commercial fishing, that did in the grayling. It was a great loss.
     
    slowpaya likes this.
  10. slowpaya

    slowpaya Premium Member

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    the logs did a job on their spawning grounds.seems I fished the rapid river for them on the last attempt,never got 1
     
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  11. mbirdsley

    mbirdsley

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    I'd be ok with paying for a special stamp to fish for them. No extra regs, can't keep them or target them with out the stamp. Catching them as a by catch would be ok as long as released. Say extra 5-10 dollars. All monies from stamp would go to enforcement and stocking of new grayling.

    I think we owe it to the species to at least give it our best shot of bringing them back. If it works great. If it fails at least we tried giving it out best.
     
    slowpaya and Steve like this.
  12. slowpaya

    slowpaya Premium Member

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    a stamp?thats not a bad idea
     
  13. Gamekeeper

    Gamekeeper

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    I'd buy one on principle.
     
  14. B.Jarvinen

    B.Jarvinen

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    Whenever I think about this idea, I can't help but think about a species that has been perhaps overly-successfully restored in the big lakes and is now finally going to have stocking levels cut - Lake Trout. What can they do with all that already existing hatchery capacity.......
     
  15. Gamekeeper

    Gamekeeper

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    I've never heard a Laker referred to by a Salmon guy except as a "Greaser".
    Tells you all you need to know about what the sportsmen want.

    I'd bet the cold water guys don't want to trade Browns for Grayling.
    Some will say it's not "either, or", but it seems to have been that way for 100 years.

    It'll be interesting if this "Miracle gro" program has any results.

    Someone will probably market a Grayling smolt lure with gray sides and a wiggly top fin for river browns.