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German Shorthair Pointer

Discussion in 'Upland Game hunting, Dogs and dog training' started by Mike da Carpenter, Nov 30, 2017.

  1. Rudi's Dad

    Rudi's Dad

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    Rob told me he was "winding down" and probably quitting the puppy business. Will continue to host NAVHDA training at his place though.
    He is around and perhaps able to refer you to another breeder. Still has the website with his email on it. (Abbey Lane Kennels)
     
  2. Hunters Edge

    Hunters Edge

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    Pluses
    1 German Shorthaired and Wirehaired the lowest in hip displasia for hunting breeds. Also one of the healthiest for knee, eyes, disorders etc., Does not mean you can not get one but your chances are much lower with this breed.
    2 Because there are so many good or great shorthairs it is much easier to get a good hunting/good temperment/good behavior/very biddable dog. Not saying you can not find this in any breed if you look long enough, just easier because of more available in the Shorthaired breed.
    3 Cost is usually less than many other breeds.
    4 Coat also basically eliminates the need for combing or removing burrs after hunt. Also I would suggest looking into heavy skinned, medium course coat. This will allow hunting without tearing up dog, it sometimes acts like Teflon.
    5 Breed is a continental breed, or versatile breed, so if you do your homework a good house dog, hunting dog and guard dog.
    6 Breed is good for both upland and waterfowl. You maybe done duck/goose hunting but your boys may decide to give it a whirl a few years from now.

    Cons
    1 Other hunters will be jealous of your full game bags.
    2 Others will want to join you and your kids on the hunt. (highly would advise to tell them no, not only safety for you and your son's, but your dog as well)

    Good luck with your new pup.

    Your only going to get out of your dog, what you put into it. So either train the pup correctly or pay to have it done right.
     
    birdhntr likes this.

  3. Hunters Edge

    Hunters Edge

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    That's correct bumping is a result of lack of training. If you do the same your going to get the same results. You would be better off staying with a flusher, if you want a 25 yard distance.
    A swath of 150 yards 200 yards will find more birds than a 50 yard swath. A pointer is to run objectives, in time they will learn to hit the objective down wind, even at times when your walking with the wind. Many mistakenly walk beside the dog or to it's side to flush. You should always flush head on toward your dog, pinching the bird. In time the dog will do this with the wind toward your back, because he has learned from behavior and as a team.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
  4. Hunters Edge

    Hunters Edge

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    I personally would not hunt rabbits with a pointing breed for several reasons. One is fur is a much stronger scent and when you go bird hunting you will be rabbit hunting because as you said more rabbits more scent and fur is stronger scent.
    Second reason is the rabbits are loaded with fleas. Dog retrieves it chances are they are on him and shortly in your house. Flea infestation in the house is not going to go over well. Also on a health item is with the rabbit in the dogs mouth very good chance he swallowed a few, those fleas will now become tape worms and possible vet bill.
    I see no issue with hunting rabbits without a dog and if I wanted one it would not be a pointer but a beagle and listen to the chase.
     
  5. Trophy Specialist

    Trophy Specialist

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    Judging by some of the comments on here, I can't help but think that a lot of posters on here have not hunted much for wild grouse in the U.P. I have hunted for grouse for over 40 years and put in over 50 days bird hunting annually. I have hunted with some of the best bird hunters and bird dogs out there over the years including most all the pointing and flushing breeds and hunters that included famous dog trainers and wing shooting authors. Bumping grouse has been a common occurrence regardless of the dog, it's training, or the owner. Some grouse just will not hold when a human or dog gets near them, and that range may be 50 or more yards away sometimes too. The more they get hunted, the more the adult birds seem to flush wild. Also, I've walked up on wolves on deer kills twice and have jumped wolves while bird hunting several other times. Let's also consider how many dogs get lost due to wide ranging habits in big woods grouse country. It's probably why so many people are using GPS tracking collars now days. Had I allowed my dogs to range way out, as some of you insist should be encouraged, I would have likely lost some dogs to predators, and a few more possible flushes is just not worth that risk in my world. If you want to risk your dogs unnecessarily, then more power to you, but recommending it to others is irresponsible and demonstrates a lack of real world experience.
     
  6. Hunters Edge

    Hunters Edge

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    It could be from hunting pressure or predators. Mostly it is when the leaves fall or a windy day. Try a beeper collar with a hawk scream when they go on point. You should see a big difference on birds holding. That is of course if your hunting with trained dogs. Also grouse dogs, several dogs if they can see the bird will bust them, hard to stop a dog watching a bird walking away the desire to chase is high, unless trained and seasoned on grouse hunting.
    Not so much in the UP but a friend has been hunting up there for at least the 40 years. He has Griff's n Wiems MH, Versatile Champions, Utility Prize dogs. He has not lost any dogs, not lost dogs to wolves, and his dogs do well on ranging. Then again in the real world with wolves their is a inherent risk. He went for a walk in the summer and 100 yards from the house a wolf stalked him on a line of spruce separating his backyard to a hay field. He now goes heeled at all times. So I understand your concern.
     
  7. BayBound

    BayBound

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    You are correct. I had been planning on getting a GSP from Rob for years but could not commit to one until this year. He told me they are done with litters. I was really disappointed but cannot blame someone for retiring! Researching others now. What I really liked hearing about Robs dogs were how great they were as a family pet. I’m still busy and kids limit my time in the woods so I’m not looking for ultra high strung hunting machine. Best of luck with your decision OP. Seems like there are a LOT of good choices.
     
  8. Rudi's Dad

    Rudi's Dad

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    Its been several years since I was up in the U.P., I came to your conclusions and stuck to them. Ill take a dog that works close(r) over a wide ranger in the woods. The older I get/got the more I liked the closer working dog.
     
    birdhntr likes this.