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Fly rod in small rivers and creeks for newbies?

Discussion in 'FlyTyingForums.com, Fly Tying, Trout Fishing' started by profisher777, Jun 2, 2017.

  1. profisher777

    profisher777

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    Just got back into trout fishing and I've been using inline spinner baits, but I have been wanting to learn how to fly fish. I fish the Coldwater river and Tyler Creek which both are crowded with trees. Would it be possible to learn fly fishing in rivers that are so small and crowded with trees? Should I stick to my spinning gear? What kind of casts do I need to learn to get my fly under trees?
     
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  2. Gamechanger

    Gamechanger Premium Member

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    I'm not familiar with the streams you mentioned, but I've provided a couple of you tube videos, one of the man I consider the best of the best when it comes to fly fishing for brookies on small streams - Joe Humphreys.

    <iframe width="1280" height="720" src="" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    And this video explains the bow and arrow cast pretty well.

    <iframe width="1280" height="720" src="" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
     
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  3. profisher777

    profisher777

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    Hey thanks. I will check those out.
     
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  4. Gamechanger covered it nicely. Mr. Humphrey's does a very sweet roll cast with a loop that is very small. On some small streams I've fished the entire day was nothing but roll casts. I also found that when a stream opens up a bit and allows a back cast a tight loop can get the groceries where they belong without draping your fly down the side of a tree. For short casts, overlining the rod a weight or two will help load the rod but can backfire and overload the rod if you get to an area that allows you to lengthen your cast.
     
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  5. slowpaya

    slowpaya Premium Member

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    welcome to mich sprtsmn profisher
     
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  6. Lamarsh

    Lamarsh

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    I've always found light spinning rods with smaller (1/8, 1/4oz) inline spinners to work best on those types of small streams (sides covered with tags, brush and such overhanging, etc); however, sometimes you just have that bug to fly fish, no pun intended. Where you can't make a back cast, you are sort of limited to a roll cast of some sort. You should put the roll cast in your bag of tricks. I have a 7' 3 weight that I love to use with light flies on small streams like you are describing. You might give something like that a try.
     
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  7. RobW

    RobW

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    Check out John Judy's book, Slackline Strategies... his book upped my game, lots of useful tips for fishing small water.

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. itchn2fish

    itchn2fish

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    You can, & folks do, fish even the skinniest, 1-4 foot wide, tag alder choked streams on the fly. You may hang quite a few flies in the tree branches, but patience, persistence, & a good sense of humor will help. I remember seeing a few Glen Blackwood videos a few years back, where he dry-fly fished some very, very small streams. I fish them (skinny streams) both wet & dry.....remember, it's not a "sin" to fish downstream...
    http://troutmoor.net/journal/
     
  9. Steve

    Steve Staff Member Admin

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    I love the idea of the bow and arrow cast. Will definitely have to add that to my small stream repotraire.
     
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  10. Boardman Brookies

    Boardman Brookies

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    This is going to seem obvious but to be effective and not spend a ton of time snagged over head you should try a shorter rod. I have a 7.5 footer I use for these little creeks and sometimes it seem to long!
     
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  11. PunyTrout

    PunyTrout

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    Best cast to learn IMO. Especially when done, "Underhand" with a spinning rod and gear...;)
     
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  12. This is a cast that you can practice in your easy chair.
     
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  13. jaytothekizzay

    jaytothekizzay

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    I have a 5 foot, cane rod. Throws a 2 wt. Trout line. I fish some tiny UP creeks with. Some are litterally 1 to 3 feet wide. Cast dry flies, and catch tiny wild brookie jems. Love that... alot

    Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk
     
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  14. strmanglr

    strmanglr

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    7ft 5wt

    Fish those same spots. Now stop talking about them :)

    Lefty Kreh has some great videos on youtube that will keep you from tearing up your rotator cuff.

    The bow and arrow cast works great w a spin rod and spinners too.

    I would strongly suggest learn and practice in your yard or other open area. Getting on a lake is great too cause you learn to pick up line off the water.

    Casting on real small streams I often do one back cast and shoot the line forward, that's it. Maybe two backcasts w room.