EHD Fearful

Discussion in 'Whitetail Deer Disease' started by Drake, Dec 19, 2018.

  1. Groundsize

    Groundsize

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    Last year Michigan has the 2nd wettest year on record in 120 years. I feel EHD is important but lets not jump the gun.
     
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  2. 7mmsendero

    7mmsendero

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    I think a big key to controlling EHD is the onset of 1st frost. The frost kills the midges. The more it’s delayed, the worse it gets. At this point we have no idea.
     

  3. Chessieman

    Chessieman

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    With the high water this fall the Midge Flies will survive better in the mud covered with water.
     
  4. DirtySteve

    DirtySteve

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    I think it is a lot more complex than just midges surviving in michigan or dry weather in michigan.

    When we have major outbreaks it is due to wide spread hot dry conditions in all the states to the south and west of us. A midge larvae that survives the winter and hatches within michigan is relatively harmless on its own. EHD is a virus and it has to spread across the landscape or be brought in from a deer farm. The midges spread the virus but we only have big outbreaks when the conditions are right for the virus to slowly spread up from the south from midge to deer to midge to deer. Midges dont travel far so it is a slow spreading disease that rarely makes it to michigan each season. You need long periods of hot dry weather over a large region to get here in a season. Midges only live a month and their larvae live up to 1 yr before hatching.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Michigan Sportsman mobile app
     
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  5. Lily Furina

    Lily Furina Banned

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    Cedar the natural Anti-viral:
    I have an off the wall suggestion and question about the absence of White Cedar for deer. I have been wondering if the lack of cedar browse might be playing into disease in deer.

    Before I explain why I suspect their "might" be some connection let me explain that I am partially Anashinabe heritage on both sides of my family. There is a long tradition of using Cedar in various ways as an anti-bacterial and as an anti-viral. Humans don't eat cedar browse but we do make teas and poultice and sweat lodge smoke.

    However deer flock to cedar and browse it so heavily it is virtually impossible to grow. Once cedar is gone it generally is not coming back naturally. Over many years loggers have prized cedar and every year more of it is removed.

    Cedar browse by deer has always been a major deer yard feature. Yet cedar browse does not provide great food for deer yet deer will eat it even when better food is right near, I have begun to wonder if deer browse cedar for the medicinal value? I am just saying "What if"? And maybe this is crazy. Yet animals seem to naturally know what they need to heal themselves. The Anishinabe have always used cedar. My Great-great grandmother healed my grandfathers leg when it was badly infected. She healed it with a cedar poultice. She did this long before humans had modern antibiotics. His leg was badly infected and the white doctors wanted to remove it. She kicked the white man doctors out of the home and wouldn't allow them in to see my grandfather.

    It might be a long shot but it might be worth some investigation. Again just an idea? Maybe some DNR lab should investigate what value Cedar browse has for sick deer? We sure aren't having much success slowing these diseases down. Do ticks play a role?
     
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  6. 7mmsendero

    7mmsendero

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    I’m thinking of planting some northern white cedar on the 5 acres around my house. I need to figure out how to cage it.