DNR Develops New Strain of Brown Trout

Discussion in 'South East Michigan Streams and Rivers' started by wanderboy, Mar 9, 2009.

  1. twohats

    twohats

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    A number of years ago I asked the DNR why they dont try to get a lake run of browns going in the Huron. The response was that lake Erie does not need and could not support another preditory fish.
     
  2. TheUrbanMustache

    TheUrbanMustache Guest

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    this makes a ton more sense than the depth theory
     

  3. Blaketrout

    Blaketrout

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    These are the type of explanations that the DNR feels are adequate. Anybody that spends a decent amount of time fishing or following the resource can see right through it. Erie is LOADED with bait. They may not be alewives but anyone that fishes the Huron knows how many Shad run that river October through May. All the rivers in the area load up with shad like that. Browns will thrive on Shad, I seen a picture recently of a 13-14 pound Brown that had an 11" shad in it's stomach. If you go out in a boat the schools of bait out in Erie are immense.

    I realize that the DNR is trying to make the best with the tight budget that they've got. I really wish they would just raise license fee's and bring the fishery around to what it used to be. Maybe a stamp program, like Wisconsin's, is the way to go. The funds the stamps provide get allocated towards that specific fishery. For example, trout/salmon stamps would not fund the DNR collecting spawning walleye under Croton.

    A-S Steelhead-
    What we did have on the East side was truely a world-class fishery. I think it was probably one of the all time best steelhead/brown fisheries in the Great Lakes. I would put it against anything going in the Great Lakes today. Now I fish Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, etc. and still believe they don't hold a candle to what was going on over there 15 years ago. It was truely amazing and the reason I get so "worked up" over what has happened over there. I think the potential still exist; the will does not.
     
  4. TheDuke33

    TheDuke33

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    I stand corrected. :hide:
     
  5. METTLEFISH

    METTLEFISH

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    Got Smelt = got Browns !. Smelt are their natural food source in the Altlantic, yes - they will adapt to avoid starvation but will not thrive or attain great proportions.

    Steelhead are very adaptable in thier diet, proof is they were in the Great Lakes for some 60-80 years before Smelt and Alewives. Chinook & Coho were brought here in the mid 60's to eleviate the Alewive problem, though there is some evidence of a small number of both Kings and Coho being established in Crytal lake since the late 1800's. They quickly learned both alewives and smelt were a great substitute for Herring, their primary food source - as they are also high in protien, like the Herring.

    Remember Michigan has no native Trout or Salmon, it is a very delicate situation for them to thrive. As mentioned - the various Mussle invasions are going to be the demise of our fisheries, or will it be the "flying'' Carp....BUMBER !.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2009
  6. twohats

    twohats

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    Brook Trout are native to Michigan
     
  7. TheUrbanMustache

    TheUrbanMustache Guest

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    brook trout and lake trout are chars
     
  8. twohats

    twohats

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    Didnt know that. Thank you Sir,Learn something new on this site every day.
     
  9. Lightline

    Lightline Guest

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    Sorry for the confusion mustache.It was a long time ago that I asked the DNR about Browns. Yes, I know how many Steelies are planted each year. I've read the Ohio and Pennsylvania Stocking Figures, as well as the Huron and Clinton. I was only relaying information i got from the DNR, but I got my emails a little confused. I write a lot of letters to them, and get a lot of replies. so i hope you can understand how I may have confused a reply. The theory of another predatroy species is closer to what I got when I asked about Browns. Here is a letter I got from the head of fisheries, after I wrote to the Governor and asked about improving our fishery:



    Thank you for your email to the Governor dated February 4, 2009 in
    which you detailed a number of concerns about Michigan*s steelhead
    fishery. We appreciate hearing from anglers about their concerns. Like
    you, we also believe that fishing and the tourism dollars that it brings
    into the State are very important. Therefore, I would like to provide
    some information about our program and our fishery resources.

    In southeast Michigan we are at a disadvantage for steelhead fishing
    when compared to Ohio, but at the same time they are at a disadvantage
    when compared to Michigan*s Lake Michigan steelhead fisheries. Most
    of the steelhead we stock in southeast Michigan are released into the
    Huron River, with some additional steelhead going into the Clinton River
    and the Belle River. However, the eastern basin of Lake Erie is not as
    suitable for steelhead as the deeper and colder central and western
    basins, where many of the steelhead stocked by Ohio are released.

    Additionally, the access from the Huron River to Lake Erie is a little
    more difficult for steelhead to traverse than streams tributary to Lake
    Michigan, and is one factor that results in lower returns of steelhead
    to the Huron than observed in streams tributary to Lake Michigan. If
    you were able to fish in Lake Michigan streams, you would find good
    steelhead fishing in the Manistee, Muskegon, White and other rivers, as
    well as in the St. Joseph River at the lower end of Lake Michigan.

    Michigan does quite well when compared to Ohio in drawing anglers and
    their dollars into the State. I agree that there is always room for
    improvement, and especially now we should be doing all we can to promote
    Michigan*s fisheries since we have some of the best fishing in the
    Midwest.

    The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) surveys anglers and hunters
    across all the states. In their most recent survey, Michigan attracted
    318,000 nonresident anglers over the age of 16 and many more under 16
    while Ohio attracted 112,000 nonresident anglers. The USFWS*s
    estimate of expenditures by anglers in Michigan was $1.67 billion, which
    was 5th in the nation behind Texas, California, Florida, and Minnesota.
    Expenditures by angler in Ohio were $1.06 billion, which was 12th in the
    nation.

    You also asked about brown trout. We are currently reviewing our
    program and implementing several new initiatives we hope will improve
    fishing for brown trout, especially in Lake Huron.

    I am very glad and heartened to hear that you would support a license
    fee increase if it would help improve fishing in Michigan. We are now
    at the point where we will be faced with severe reductions to our
    fisheries program without increased revenue in the coming year.

    Thank you again for your comments and your support.

    Kelley D. Smith, Ph.D.
    Chief
    Fisheries Division
    Department of Natural Resources
    517-373-3375
     
  10. P.C. Tweek

    P.C. Tweek Guest

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    I think its great that the DNR are developing a new stocking strain of Brown Trout from Sturgeon River fish. I used to fish the Sturgeon for years and the browns are colorful and can grow big! This new strain should do well for lakes and streams.

    P.C. Tweek,