Discussing Inland Lake Walleye Stocking

Discussion in 'Warm Water Fishing Inland LP Lakes' started by CatfishKurt, Dec 3, 2019.

  1. CrawlerHarness

    CrawlerHarness

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    I appreciate the advice. I am tempted to head out with the boat tomorrow to a small lake....especially with the Saginaw Bay having another rough forecast for tomorrow.
     
  2. shoprat51

    shoprat51

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    Houghtan lake is the only inland lake I have caught any walleye on most where small or barely legal it was early summer trolling the edge of weedbeds with KVD squire bills I do fish there a few times a year it's closer than the bay to me. From what I can gather from year round residents most of the bigger walleyes are takin icefishing

    Sent from my LM-X210VPP using Michigan Sportsman mobile app
     

  3. Walley Gordo

    Walley Gordo

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    Love that avatar pic.
     
  4. Jimbos

    Jimbos

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    It took me a long time to dial in and figure out my favorite inland lake, which by the way is not stocked for some unknown reason.
    I come from the Lake Erie/Detroit River school of walleye until finally having my fill of the whole circus and giving it up and had to learn a whole different way of fishing.
    But really I only have a small spectrum in a small period of time in the year figured out, then they pull a Houdini and they're illusive as hell, but for a 2 month period I can lay the lumber down on them and I've shared all of the particulars for a certain day many times on this site.
    It's gotten to the point of me wanting to try different methods because I got weary of pulling boards.

    I hadn't read the whole thread until now. There's no comparison, none what so ever between the big SE Michigan waters and inland lake fishing including the big half dozen in northern Michigan. What you can get away with for tackle and lures would never fly in the clear water up north. 1 oz jigheads? ROFLMAO!!!!
    That said, I'd rather catch 2 nice eaters out of Burt then 2 limits of the nastiest tasting fish in the Detroit River.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2019
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  5. kzoofisher

    kzoofisher

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    Most inland lakes lack traditional walleye structure and traditional open water walleye prey. This means the fish are heavily oriented to weeds. You have to fish methods that let you get into the weeds or find the fish oriented near weeds and fish them from a distance because of our clear water. Slip bobbers are a good choice. So are reaction baits. Side looking sonar helps you find the fish without spooking them. Knowing right where the weeds are makes a big difference, too. The fish do move further away from the weeds and up shallow at night but most people don't enjoy night fishing.

    Strongly recommend this guys videos. He's from Wisconsin but lots of what he says is applicable to Michigan. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRExOt3taw88mQiuyXrQpzA
     
  6. Bay BornNRaised

    Bay BornNRaised

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    Sure would be nice to be able to fish walleye year round on some inland lakes. See no huge benefit of closing it for spawning when most inland lakes have no major waterways for them to spawn in. Most inland lakes don't compare to the great lakes in many ways so having same rules apply seems bundled together for anglers. JMO
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2019
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  7. waldowillie

    waldowillie

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    Hey MDNR, keep stocking walleye in inland lakes for your program is working in many lakes. I personally contact them to let them know where their inland stocking is working. Walleye location is very specific in most inland waters, but year after year you can come back to the same spots for success once you put in the time to find those spots. Yes stocked walleye are weed oriented due to their rearing; but the best weed is Elodea for it puts out the most oxygen. In most featureless inland lakes a single piece of downed wood, a small rocky area, an Elodea bed, or a gravel/weed edge will hold walleye. Takes about 5 trips to figure out each 100 acres of inland water, but once figured out it is rewarding.
     
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  8. Jimbos

    Jimbos

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    I couldn't disagree more, inland lakes walleye are so much more sensitive to even small changes in their environment affecting their numbers. Any spawning taking place should be protected at all costs.
    A couple of local lakes ha e been getting pounded in the spring by our native brothers since the loosening of that consent decree 5-10 years back permitting subsistence spearing and they take full advantage of it and the lakes show it, especially since the DNR stopped all stocking on those lakes.
    Look at Mullet lake, the walleye fishery was destroyed by overfishing and I believe netting of spring time walleye.
     
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  9. Bay BornNRaised

    Bay BornNRaised

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    I agree with your post. Some inland lakes are bigger or get more activity over other's. Some lakes have been stocked with continued stocks. They say there are very Good numbers in some with natural reproduction showing success. Certain lakes certain regs. I have zero good to say about the netters, So I wont comment futher. Huge difference between what hook n line anglers take compared to netters take.
     
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  10. Jimbos

    Jimbos

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    I don't quite understand the DNR's thinking on many lakes walleye stocking programs being cutback, or some never being stocked at all except by some mistake 40 years before.

    I don't want to insult any one DNR employee who happens to post here because if you ask you'll get a legitimate sounding answer, but I highly disagree in their thinking on 4 very nearby lakes in particular and their lack of a walleye stocking program.
    They may stock rainbow trout for example, I'd say unscientifically that the fishing effort for rainbow trout is 5% of what the walleye effort would be.
     
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  11. kzoofisher

    kzoofisher

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    Agree it would be nice. I brought this up at a Coldwater Committee meeting after the rep from Jay's said he thought that the walleye opener coinciding with the trout opener hurt trout fishing recruitment. The argument against was that there would have to be exceptions for the lakes with good spawning like Mullet, Burt, Indian River chain and Houghton or they would be over fished, and that would make the regs too complicated. I disagree with the over complicated part but I know a lot of people would agree. Not a big enough issue to have a fight over imo but it would be nice to see a change.
     
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  12. CatfishKurt

    CatfishKurt

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    Thanks for all of the informative replys guys. I definitely learned a few things and changed my perspective a bit. I'm just glad those who do have success are willing to share, sometimes that's a tall order when talking inland water.
     
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  13. kzoofisher

    kzoofisher

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    I've had that same discussion with the same result. It's a tough spot they're in and I'm sympathetic while at the same time disappointed. These inland trout fisheries have a lot of tradition behind them and very likely a lot of local voters who would strongly support their neighbors who fish for them. And who would strongly oppose "their" lake being more attractive to fishermen than it already is. That's enough to make switching species a PITA for the DNR. The DNR isn't going to be that explicit about it, they'll talk about "tradition" and "diversity of opportunity", but I can read between the lines. I understand that that's the way it is sometimes and if enough walleye guys band together to call for a change it might happen. Or the lakes might no longer support trout and then it will happen.

    You're 100% right about not insulting the DNR guys who post here. They really are doing their best and despite what some people seem to think, they're just small wheels in the great big machine of all the governments that oversee the Great Lakes. Can you imagine if it was your job to answer phone calls from everyone who posts here and politely answer their questions? I couldn't do it. But the resources do belong to us so we have the right to ask those questions and they have the responsibility to answer as best they can. But I always try to remember that the guy who donates to the State Rep or Senator or sits on the local C of C gets to ask questions too. It is what it is.
     
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  14. hellCATw900

    hellCATw900

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    I thought Union Lake over by Pontiac was supposed to be one of the best walleye lakes in the state of Michigan? I've never fished it so I can not say to any degree of accuracy, just something I read somewhere. Back on topic, I live on a small lake south of Grand Rapids, called Barlow Lake. For years, they stocked it every spring and fall with walleye. Barlow is private so the lake association funded it. In the open water months, I would fish every night I could and I would pull 5 or 6 fish over 16 inches out of the water. This was after 4 or 5 years of continuous stocking. To my knowledge, the stocking was not regulated by the DNR, fish were being put into the lake at a rate that the lake couldn't support. When a new fisheries manager took over, that changed and Barlow hasn't been stocked in about 5 years. This fall that changed, under the guidance of the DNR, several thousand were reintroduced. What I noticed when excessive amounts a of walleye were present were this: Everything else in the lake suffered. Barlow by nature does not have the rocky gravel required of spawning so it was give and take. The bass population and quality deteriorated as did the spec, gill, perch and pike. I haven't seen a cisco in Barlow in years. Since the population has been fished down over the last 5 years, things have started to come back. I pick up some large pike in 40+ feet of water near the bottom in the middle of summer that are in their scavenging lethargic state, but usually only hammer handles are caught. My thoughts are this: If you're going to introduce a new predator fish, you had better be sure that the lake can support a new introduction, and that it's controlled or else every other fishable species will be affected. Personally, I would rather go to an area where they occur naturally rather than risking jeopardizing a variety of fishing.
     
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  15. shametamer

    shametamer

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    natural walleye lakes were few and far between..but i do agree the dnr does a pitiful job on where they plant.. i have seen walleyes adversely affect perch populations in a number of lakes..meat trade off is ok..accept much harder to put planted walleye in the boat than natural perch....and growth rates of planted walleyes inland seem slow.... in 65 years of fishing , i have never taken a walleye inland above 6.5 pounds(i do not count muskegon lake, manistee lake, etc as inland..as the fish move in from the big water).....pine river walleye state record..a.k.a tippy dam backwaters..must have fished her 150 times over the years..never seen nor heard of a fish much over 8 lbs..and since 94, 1 fish makes master angler there