CWD TSE Prion State by State Run Down, Nebraska Confirms 203 Cases

Discussion in 'Wildlife Diseases' started by terry, Feb 5, 2018.

  1. terry

    terry

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  2. otcarcher

    otcarcher

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    "Although present in Colorado and Wyoming for several decades, CWD was first discovered in Nebraska in 2000 in Kimball County. Since 1997, Commission staff have tested nearly 51,000 deer and found 499 that tested positive. CWD has been found in 40 Nebraska counties, but no population declines attributable to the disease have yet occurred."
     
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  3. terry

    terry

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    LOL! give it time, Rome was not built in a day...


    To date, the WGFD has not conducted on-the-ground management for CWD, making Wyoming an example of CWD impacts in the absence of directed management. After recent research identified POPULATION DECLINES DUE TO CWD IN WYOMING (Edmunds 2016, DeVivo 2015), the WGFD made a commitment to pursue management options...

    https://www.fws.gov/uploadedFiles/FINAL_CWDForumProceedings05_06_17.pdf

    In the endemic area of Wyoming, for example, the prevalence of CWD in mule deer has increased from approximately 11% in 1997 to 36% in 2007 (Almberg et al., 2011). In such areas, population declines of deer of up to 30 to 50% have been observed (Almberg et al., 2011). In areas of Colorado, the prevalence can be as high as 30% (EFSA, 2011).

    http://webarchive.nationalarchives..../files/qra_chronic-wasting-disease-121029.pdf

    2009 • Research - CWD may be a plausible explanation for local deer population declines in Colorado; prions shed in feces in early stages of CWD in infected deer; prions are present in urine and saliva

    https://cpw.state.co.us/Documents/Research/CWD/Miller-Fischer_CWDlessons.pdf

    Prolonged faecal prion excretion by infected deer provides a plausible natural mechanism that might explain the high incidence and efficient horizontal transmission of CWD within deer herds3,4,9, as well as prion transmission among other susceptible cervids.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/nature08289

    ***Moreover, sporadic disease has never been observed in breeding colonies or primate research laboratories, most notably among hundreds of animals over several decades of study at the National Institutes of Health25, and in nearly twenty older animals continuously housed in our own facility.***

    http://www.nature.com/articles/srep11573

    *** Infectious agent of sheep scrapie may persist in the environment for at least 16 years ***

    Gudmundur Georgsson1, Sigurdur Sigurdarson2 and Paul Brown3

    http://jgv.sgmjournals.org/content/87/12/3737.full

    Back around 2000, 2001, or so, I was corresponding with officials abroad during the bse inquiry, passing info back and forth, and some officials from here inside USDA aphis FSIS et al. In fact helped me get into the USA 50 state emergency BSE conference call way back. That one was a doozy. But I always remember what “deep throat” I never knew who they were, but I never forgot;

    Some unofficial information from a source on the inside looking out -

    Confidential!!!!

    As early as 1992-3 there had been long studies conducted on small pastures containing scrapie infected sheep at the sheep research station associated with the Neuropathogenesis Unit in Edinburgh, Scotland. Whether these are documented...I don't know. But personal recounts both heard and recorded in a daily journal indicate that leaving the pastures free and replacing the topsoil completely at least 2 feet of thickness each year for SEVEN years....and then when very clean (proven scrapie free) sheep were placed on these small pastures.... the new sheep also broke out with scrapie and passed it to offspring. I am not sure that TSE contaminated ground could ever be free of the agent!! A very frightening revelation!!!

    ---end personal email---end...tss

    Endemic chronic wasting disease causes mule deer population decline in Wyoming

    Melia T. DeVivo ,David R. Edmunds,Matthew J. Kauffman,Brant A. Schumaker,Justin Binfet,Terry J. Kreeger ,Bryan J. Richards,Hermann M. Schätzl,Todd E. Cornish
    Published: October 19, 2017https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0186512

    These findings support CWD as a significant contributor to mule deer population decline. Chronic wasting disease is difficult or impossible to eradicate with current tools, given significant environmental contamination, and at present our best recommendation for control of this disease is to minimize spread to new areas and naïve cervid populations.

    http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0186512

    Chronic Wasting Disease Drives Population Decline of White-Tailed Deer

    David R. Edmunds ,Matthew J. Kauffman,Brant A. Schumaker,Frederick G. Lindzey,Walter E. Cook,Terry J. Kreeger,Ronald G. Grogan,Todd E. Cornish

    Published: August 30, 2016https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0161127

    We show that a chronic disease that becomes endemic in wildlife populations has the potential to be population-limiting and the strong population-level effects of CWD suggest affected populations are not sustainable at high disease prevalence under current harvest levels.

    http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0161127

    Modeling Routes of Chronic Wasting Disease Transmission: Environmental Prion Persistence Promotes Deer Population Decline and Extinction

    Emily S. Almberg ,Paul C. Cross,Christopher J. Johnson,Dennis M. Heisey,Bryan J. Richards Published: May 13, 2011https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0019896

    In several high-prevalence study areas in Wyoming and Colorado, biologists have witnessed coincident population declines of up to 30–50% [21], [26].

    In contrast to most studies that have modeled CWD transmission as being direct, our results suggest that despite relatively low prevalence growth rates, CWD epidemics fueled in part by indirect transmission may be characterized by higher values of R0, peak and endemic prevalences, and more severe host declines than previously thought.

    Furthermore, although prions may be capable of persisting much longer than that which we modeled (half-life>8 yrs) [38], based on the patterns in our simulations, we suspect that this would simply translate to even higher levels of disease prevalence, greater propensities for host declines, and even larger amounts of effort needed for disease control.

    http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0019896#pone.0019896-Miller5

    Lions and Prions and Deer Demise

    Methodology/Principal Findings Using a cohort study design, we found that prion infection dramatically lowered survival of free-ranging adult (>2-year-old) mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus): estimated average life expectancy was 5.2 additional years for uninfected deer but only 1.6 additional years for infected deer. Prion infection also increased nearly fourfold the rate of mountain lions (Puma concolor) preying on deer, suggesting that epidemics may alter predator–prey dynamics by facilitating hunting success. Despite selective predation, about one fourth of the adult deer we sampled were infected. High prevalence and low survival of infected deer provided a plausible explanation for the marked decline in this deer population since the 1980s.

    Conclusion

    Remarkably high infection rates sustained in the face of intense predation show that even seemingly complete ecosystems may offer little resistance to the spread and persistence of contagious prion diseases. Moreover, the depression of infected populations may lead to local imbalances in food webs and nutrient cycling in ecosystems in which deer are important herbivores.

    Michael W. Miller ,Heather M. Swanson,Lisa L. Wolfe,Fred G. Quartarone,Sherri L. Huwer,Charles H. Southwick,Paul M. Lukacs Published: December 24, 2008https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0004019

    http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0004019

    see state by state cwd positives sample surveys for 2017 that have come in to date in the link below, about midway down...terry

    MONDAY, FEBRUARY 05, 2018

    Nebraska Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE Prion 2017 Survey Confirms 203 Positives From 1,807 Deer Sampled

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2018/02/nebraska-chronic-wasting-disease-cwd.html
     
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  4. otcarcher

    otcarcher

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    I find it sad that you're so blinded by your search for the truth, that you're blinded by the truth. CWD isn't killing people, CWD isn't infecting cows, and CWD didn't kill your loved one. The only studies to show a decline or potential extinction of deer in Wyoming from CWD relied on live testing of deer with 100% accuracy. No such test exists. But hey, by all means, continue on with your fear mongering narrative against meat. Reminds me of the ongoing attack and fear mongering narrative related to Glysophate.......
     
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