CWD: Sent to me from Mary Dettloff public information officer from the DNR

Discussion in 'Whitetail Deer Disease' started by Steve, Aug 26, 2008.

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  1. Steve

    Steve Staff Member Admin

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    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Aug. 25, 2008

    Contacts: Bridget Patrick (MDA) 517-241-2669 or Mary Dettloff (DNR)
    517-335-3014



    Michigan’s First Case of Chronic Wasting Disease Detected at Kent
    County Deer Breeding Facility


    LANSING - The Michigan departments of Agriculture (MDA) and Natural
    Resources (DNR) today confirmed the state’s first case of Chronic
    Wasting Disease (CWD) in a three-year old white-tailed deer from a
    privately owned cervid (POC) facility in Kent County.

    The state has quarantined all POC facilities, prohibiting the movement
    of all - dead or alive - privately-owned deer, elk or moose. Officials
    do not yet know how the deer may have contracted the disease. To date,
    there is no evidence that CWD presents a risk to humans.

    DNR and MDA staff are currently reviewing records from the Kent County
    facility and five others to trace deer that have been purchased, sold or
    moved by the owners in the last five years for deer and the last seven
    years for elk. Any deer that may have come in contact with the
    CWD-positive herd have been traced to their current location and those
    facilities have been quarantined.

    “Michigan’s veterinarians and wildlife experts have been working
    throughout the weekend to complete their investigation,” said Don
    Koivisto, MDA director. “We take this disease very seriously, and are
    using every resource available to us to implement response measures and
    stop the spread of this disease.”

    CWD is a fatal neurological disease that affects deer, elk and moose.
    Most cases of the disease have been in western states, but in the past
    several years, it has spread to some midwestern and eastern states.
    Infected animals display abnormal behaviors, progressive weight loss and
    physical debilitation.

    Current evidence suggests that the disease is transmitted through
    infectious, self-multiplying proteins (prions) contained in saliva and
    other fluids of infected animals. Susceptible animals can acquire CWD by
    direct exposure to these fluids or also from contaminated environments.
    Once contaminated, research suggests that soil can remain a source of
    infection for long periods of time, making CWD a particularly difficult
    disease to eradicate.

    Michigan’s First Case of Chronic Wasting Disease Detected at Kent
    County Deer Breeding Facility: page 2

    “Currently, one of our top concerns is to confirm that the disease is
    not in free-ranging deer,” said DNR Director Rebecca Humphries. “We
    are asking hunters this fall to assist us by visiting check stations to
    allow us to take biological samples from the deer they harvest, so we
    can perform adequate surveillance of the free-ranging white-tailed deer
    herd in the area.”

    Deer hunters this fall who take deer from Tyrone, Soldon, Nelson,
    Sparta, Algoma, Courtland, Alpine, Plainfield, and Cannon townships will
    be required to bring their deer to a DNR check station. Deer taken in
    these townships are subject to mandatory deer check.

    The DNR is also asking hunters who are participating in the private
    land five-day antlerless hunt in September in other parts of Kent County
    to visit DNR check stations in Kent County so further biological
    samples can be taken from free-ranging deer for testing. The DNR is in
    the process of finding additional locations for check stations in Kent
    County to make it more convenient for hunters.

    The deer that tested positive at the Kent County facility was a doe
    that had been recently culled by the owner of the facility. Michigan law
    requires sick deer or culled deer on a POC facility be tested for
    disease. The samples from the Kent County deer tested “suspect
    positive” last week at Michigan State University Diagnostic Center for
    Population and Animal Health, and were sent to the National Veterinary
    Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa last Thursday for confirmatory
    testing. The positive results of those tests were communicated to the
    state of Michigan today.

    Audits of the facility by the DNR in 2004 and 2007 showed no escapes of
    animals from the Kent County facility were reported by the owner. Also,
    there were no violations of regulations recorded during the audits.

    Since 2002, the DNR has tested 248 wild deer in Kent County for CWD. In
    summer 2005, a number of those deer had displayed neurological symptoms
    similar to CWD; however, after testing it was determined the deer had
    contracted Eastern Equine Encephalitis.

    More information on CWD is available on Michigan’s Emerging Diseases
    Web site at www.michigan.gov/chronicwastingdisease.
     
  2. bounty hunter

    bounty hunter Banned

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    I had a friend call to tell me that he heard on the news that there is a total no baiting law for the entire lower peninsula...
     

  3. 2tundras

    2tundras

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    Its not done yet but I give it two days.




    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Aug. 26, 2008
    Contact: Mary Dettloff 517-335-3014




    DNR Acts to Implement CWD Surveillance and Response Plan
    In the wake of Monday’s announcement that Chronic Wasting Disease
    (CWD) has been confirmed in a three-year old privately-owned
    white-tailed deer in Kent County, the Michigan Department of Natural
    Resources is acting immediately to implement provisions of the state’s
    Surveillance and Response Plan for CWD.

    Among the provisions is an immediate ban on all baiting and feeding ofdeer and elk in the Lower Peninsula. DNR conservation officers will step
    up surveillance and enforcement efforts on baiting. Baiting and feeding
    unnaturally congregate deer into close contact, thus increasing the
    transmission of contagious diseases such as CWD and bovine tuberculosis.
    Bait and feed sites increase the likelihood that those areas will
    become contaminated with the feces of infected animals, making them a
    source of CWD infection for years to come.
    Additionally, the provisions include a mandatory deer check for hunters
    who take a deer within Tyrone, Solon, Nelson, Sparta, Algoma, Courtland,
    Alpine, Plainfield, and Cannon townships, which contain the surveillance
    area or "hot zone." All hunters who take a deer during any deer
    hunting season this fall within the "hot zone" will be required to
    visit a DNR deer check station so that their deer can be tested for CWD.
    The DNR currently is seeking locations for additional deer check
    stations in the area to make it more convenient for hunters. To prevent
    unintentional spread of CWD, the only parts of deer harvested in the
    surveillance zone that will be allowed to be transported out will be
    boned meat, capes, and antlers cleaned of all soft tissues.
    In addition, all transport of live wild deer, elk and moose will be
    prohibited statewide, including transport for rehabilitation purposes.
    Currently, there is no live animal test for CWD, and infected animals
    often show no signs of illness for years in spite of being infectious
    for other animals. Movement for rehabilitation purposes may speed
    geographic spread of the disease.
    The DNR will act immediately to test an additional 300 deer within the
    "hot zone" in Kent County. The DNR will be cooperating with local
    officials to collect fresh road-killed deer, and will be urging deer
    hunters participating in the early antlerless season on private land in
    September to comply with the mandatory deer check.
    Landowners in Kent County "hot zone" who would like to obtain
    disease control permits to cull deer from their property and assist with
    the collection of deer for testing should contact the DNR’s Wildlife
    Disease Lab at 517-336-5030. Permits will be available immediately upon
    request. Landowners who do not want to cull deer, but want to
    participate in the collection of deer for testing, can obtain assistance
    from the DNR in culling deer.
    DNR officials reminded citizens that, to date, there is no evidence
    that CWD poses a risk to humans, nor has there been verified evidence
    that the disease can be transmitted to humans.
    CWD is a fatal neurological disease that affects deer, elk and moose.
    Most cases of the disease have been in western states, but in the past
    several years, it has spread to Midwestern and eastern states. Infected
    animals display abnormal behaviors, loss of bodily functions and a
    progressive weight loss. Current evidence suggests that the disease is
    transmitted through infectious, self-multiplying proteins (prions).
    Prions are normal cell proteins whose shape has been transformed,
    causing CWD. The disease is transmitted by exposure to saliva of
    infected animals. Susceptible animals can also acquire CWD by eating
    feces from an infected animal, or soil contaminated by them. Once
    contaminated, soil can remain a source of infection for many years,
    making CWD a particularly difficult disease to manage.
    More information about CWD is available on the State of Michigan’s
    Emerging Diseases Web site at [/SIZE]www.michigan.gov/chronicwastingdisease.
    The DNR is committed to the conservation, protection, use and enjoyment
    of the state’s natural resources for current and future generations.
    ###




     
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  4. ishot3bucks

    ishot3bucks

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  5. 2tundras

    2tundras

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    Yeah? NRC order? Didnt see it anywhere.
     
  6. Linda G.

    Linda G.

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    I think this is something that has already been approved by the NRC per the MDA when they set up their CWD "Plan".
     
  7. Joe Archer

    Joe Archer Staff Member Mods

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    There has been a baiting ban in Alpena since the discovery of TB. The Wal-Mart and every gas station in the area still sell bait at a probable ton/day pace. It will be interesting to see if the law is enforced more strictly in lower Michigan related to CWD than it has been in the NLP with TB.
    <----<<<
     
  8. wally-eye

    wally-eye Guest

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    Yep they opened the baiting door and it will be very interesting to see how effective they are in closing it.........:sad:

    Gonna be hard for people to really learn how to hunt now.......
     
  9. MuskyDan

    MuskyDan

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    I would have no problem not using a food plot or a bucket of lucky buck and I will be happy to stop once every high fence operation in the state has been abolished. Until then a baiting ban is nothing more than a scheme by the politics of hunting attempting to show that they care!!
     
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  10. gunfun13

    gunfun13

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    Thats a pretty ignorant statement. Although I agree high fence operations should be shut down, it's a fact the CWD can be spread though mineral licks and food where deer contact each other. In fact, it can even be spread through infected soil. Eliminating or trying to avoid these scenarios is PART of the solution, and should be accepted by all sportsman.
     
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  11. MuskyDan

    MuskyDan

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    The infected deer is in a cage man! Where I live suger beet farmers leave small but eaten piles in every beet field and there hasn't been CWD! I have trail cam pics of several deer using the same licking branch and there is no CWD. How do you suppose we stop that from happening? Will the DNR ban licking branches at deer scrapes? The ignorant thing about this is that people think that by not baiting in the SELP it will some how stop the disease from spreading in the CWLP?

    It reminds me of the VHS issue. People using minnows didn't start that problem just like people using carrots didn't start this problem. Fix the problem where it started, how hard is that to figure out!!
     
  12. GrizzlyBear

    GrizzlyBear

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    Upwinding you....
    Wow, some statement there. Willing to break the law and continue to bait in the face of a ban because of high fence operations??? I understand that CWD has been related to both, but I don't see how admitting to a willingness to break the law will help your case....
     
  13. MuskyDan

    MuskyDan

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    I said I have no problem not using bait!! Read it again. My point was that banning bait before banning high fence farmers is futile!
     
  14. skipper34

    skipper34

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    Right or wrong, futile or not, they have to start somewhere. Banning bait immediately is an easier course than banning high-fence operations in one felled swoop. Think about it-as of now there will be no baiting. How can you tell the deer breeders that as of now there will be no more breeding or raising of captive deer? The baiting ban is only the first step. The rest will follow in due time.
     
  15. D-Fresh

    D-Fresh

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    To play devils advocate (not taking sides here)...what about the families/businesses that have banked on getting $$ for selling the acres and acres of deer feed they have in the ground and/or are harvesting now??? For some it may be their only income or a huge part of it.

    Bottom line this is bad news. It doesn't pay for us sportsmen to sit around and argue this and that. We need to do what protects and preserves what we all love to do, hunt, and we need to do it together.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2008
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