CWD MICHIGAN UPDATE September 5, 2008

Discussion in 'Whitetail Deer Disease' started by terry, Sep 9, 2008.

  1. terry

    terry Banned

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    CWD Update Chronic Wasting Disease Eradication Program Provided by the Animal Industry Division Michigan Department of Agriculture September 5, 2008

    Background: The Michigan departments of Agriculture (MDA) and Natural Resources (DNR) confirmed the state’s first case of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in a three-year old white-tailed deer from a privately owned cervid (POC) facility in Kent County on Monday, August 25, 2008. The state quarantined all POC facilities, prohibiting the movement of all – dead or alive – privately-owned deer, elk, or moose. Officials do not yet know how the deer may have contracted the disease. To date, there is no evidence that CWD presents a risk to humans or to animals other than cervids. MDA Actions: The state-wide quarantine on all privately owned cervid facilities is still in place. Facilities may continue to hold shooting events, but all carcasses* must be held until testing clears the animal/or the quarantine is released. A clarification to the quarantines was published and distributed to law enforcement officials, stakeholders and other interested parties. A questions and answers sheet is available under the livestock link on the www.michigan.gov/chronicwastingdisease website.

    The test results from the Kent County cervid breeding facility, where the index case was confirmed, found no additional diseased deer. Epidemiologists are reviewing taxidermy records on a facility related to the index case. Taxidermy operations must be licensed and operators must follow Michigan requirements when conducting business with hunters who have harvested animals from other states. Current Michigan law prohibits the import of free-ranging deer or elk carcasses from states or provinces with CWD. Only de-boned meat, antlers, antlers attached to a scull cap cleaned of all brain and muscle tissue, hides and upper canine teeth may be brought into Michigan. A person that is notified by mail or other means, that a carcass imported into Michigan tested positive for CWD must notify the Michigan DNR.

    The first tier of traces from the index facility led to five facilities: three in Kent County, one in Montcalm County, and one in Osceola County. These facilities were quarantined by MDA. Records of sales and purchases have been reviewed and have revealed that two facilities received deer from the index case. Four deer from these two facilities were 2 euthanized, samples were tested at MSU’s DCPAH and were found to be negative on Thursday, September 04, 2008. One of the five facilities in tier one, also a Kent County facility conducts a taxidermy operation on the premises. Taxidermy is of great concern because infectious prions in the bones and spinal tissue of the carcass from CWD positive states can infect deer on the facility. MDA, DNR and USDA staff are investigating the records of the taxidermy operation. The second tier investigation to this point, has quarantined four facilities in Bay, Kent, Mecosta, and Saginaw counties. These facilities only sold to the tier one facilities and did not receive anything. They are quarantined as terminal operations and any deer that die, are culled, or shot for sport must be submitted for CWD testing. POC Facilities Quarantined: All POC facilities, except those that only have reindeer, are under quarantine in Michigan until the disease investigation is complete. Epidemiologists are developing a policy for records review and release of quarantines based on management practices and risk.

    Disease Surveillance Table: Index facility Depopulated Tier 1 Tier 2 1 Entire index herd tested negative 5 herds 2 trace outs (four test-negative animals) 3 trace ins 4 none of these 4 facilities trace directly to the index facility DNR Actions: The ban on all baiting and feeding of deer and elk in the Lower Peninsula is in effect. MSU’s Product Center for Agriculture Development is taking calls from bait growers/sellers. The Center is using Michigan Market Maker, an interactive mapping system that connects Agriculture processors and businesses with Michigan growers and marketers. http://mi.marketmaker.uiuc.edu/ Information on the baiting and feeding ban is available on the CWD page of the Emerging Diseases website. A mandatory deer check for hunters who take a deer within the Kent County townships of Tyrone, Solon, Nelson, Sparta, Algoma, Courtland, Alpine, Plainfield, and Cannon, is in effect for the 2008 hunting season. The deer heads will be collected and tested for CWD. All transport of live wild deer, elk, and moose is prohibited statewide, including transport for rehabilitation purposes. Education and Outreach: A town hall meeting is scheduled to take place in Kent County on September 9, 2008 at 6:30 p.m. near Grand Rapids. Representatives from MDA, USDA, DNR and MSU will be there to answer questions about CWD, quarantines and the baiting ban. An update on the disease investigation will be presented to the House of Representatives Committee on Outdoor Recreation and Natural Resources on September 9, 2008 and the Senate Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Hunting and Fishing committees on September 10, 2008. 3 Questions and Answers regarding POC facility quarantines were sent via email to legislative offices, POC facility executive directors, and DNR law enforcement. They are also posted to the MDA, and Emerging Diseases websites. A coordinated communications action plan is in place. MSU Extension, Michigan Deer and Elk Breeders, MUCC, and many other special interest groups have volunteered to assist with information distribution. Information on CWD may be found on the Michigan Emerging Diseases website at www.michigan.gov/emergingdiseases. Corrected on September 8, 2008 – changed from “meat” to “carcasses”.

    http://www.michigan.gov/documents/e...WD_Update_September_5_2008_final_248172_7.pdf

    http://www.michigan.gov/emergingdiseases/0,1607,7-186-25806_26356---,00.html

    Summary of Michigan Wildlife Chronic Wasting Disease Surveillance Updated May 1, 2008 by Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Disease Laboratory

    http://www.michigan.gov/documents/emergingdiseases/CWDTable082508_246523_7.pdf

    http://www.michigan.gov/images/emergingdiseases/cwdcum1998_2002-050108_246525_7.jpg

    Consumer Warning September – December 2008

    The state's first case of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) was confirmed in a three-year old white-tailed deer from a privately owned cervid (POC) facility in Kent County on August 25, 2008. As a result, all POC facilities in Michigan were quarantined. Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a fatal neurological disease that affects deer, elk and moose. Infected animals display abnormal behavior, progressive weight loss and physical debilitation. CWD is believed to be caused by infectious, self-multiplying proteins (prions). Prions are normal cell proteins whose shape has been transformed, causing CWD. To date, CWD is not known to cause or be associated with disease in humans. No increase in human prion disease has been observed in areas of the western United States where CWD has been endemic in cervid populations for decades.

    However, because much is still unknown about prion diseases, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization advise that humans do NOT consume animals that have been tested and are known to be infected with CWD. In general, people should not handle or consume wild animals that appear sick or act abnormally, regardless of the cause. CWD prions are primarily found in central nervous system tissues (e.g. brain and spinal cord) and the lymphatic system (e.g. tonsils, lymph nodes and spleen) of infected cervids. Humans should avoid the handling or consumption of these tissues. Hunters should wear disposable gloves while field dressing and de-boning meat from the carcass. Recent research has shown that CWD prions may also be found in the saliva and urine of the infected animal. Experiments conducted suggest that CWD prions can persist in the environment and may indirectly infect other susceptible animals that come into contact with the contaminated environment. The meat product you are receiving has come from a quarantined facility under surveillance for CWD. MDA recommends you take de-boned meat from the carcass, hold the meat product in a freezer and consume it only after the facility of origin receives clarification from MDA that the animal was negative for CWD.

    http://www.michigan.gov/documents/emergingdiseases/Meat_-_CWD_Consumer_Warning_final_248038_7.pdf

    From: TSS Subject: CWD aka MAD DEER/ELK TO HUMANS ??? Date: September 30, 2002 at 7:06 am PST

    From: "Belay, Ermias" To: Cc: "Race, Richard (NIH)" ; ; "Belay, Ermias" Sent: Monday, September 30, 2002 9:22 AM Subject: RE: TO CDC AND NIH - PUB MED- 3 MORE DEATHS - CWD - YOUNG HUNTERS

    Dear Sir/Madam, In the Archives of Neurology you quoted (the abstract of which was attached to your email), we did not say CWD in humans will present like variant CJD.

    That assumption would be wrong. I encourage you to read the whole article and call me if you have questions or need more clarification (phone: 404-639-3091). Also, we do not claim that "no-one has ever been infected with prion disease from eating venison." Our conclusion stating that we found no strong evidence of CWD transmission to humans in the article you quoted or in any other forum is limited to the patients we investigated.

    Ermias Belay, M.D. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    -----Original Message----- From: Sent: Sunday, September 29, 2002 10:15 AM To: [log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]; [log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]; [log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask] Subject: TO CDC AND NIH - PUB MED- 3 MORE DEATHS - CWD - YOUNG HUNTERS

    Sunday, November 10, 2002 6:26 PM ......snip........end..............TSS

    snip...see full text ;

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/08/cwd-stakeholder-advisory-group.html

    The meat product you are receiving has come from a quarantined facility under surveillance for CWD. MDA recommends you take de-boned meat from the carcass, hold the meat product in a freezer and consume it only after the facility of origin receives clarification from MDA that the animal was negative for CWD.<<<

    HOW WOULD ANYONE KNOW THIS UNLESS EVERY DEER, ELK, CERVID, ON EVERY GAME FARM IN MICHIGAN IS TESTED???

    IT WOULD BE INTERESTING TO KNOW EXACTLY HOW MANY CWD TEST WERE PERFORMED IN ALL OF THE GAME FARMS IN MICHIGAN SINCE THE 1ST CASE WAS REPORTED ???

    CLAIMING 'ALL CLEAR' WITHOUT PERFORMING TEST, would be foolish in my opinion. ...TSS

    [2] USA: (Wyoming) Date: Mon 29 Oct 2007 Source: The Courier Journal [edited]

    <http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071028/SPORTS09/710280596/1002/SPORTS>

    An Indiana hunter will be allowed to keep the head mount of a deer he killed in Wyoming that tested positive for chronic wasting disease.

    The unidentified hunter knew about the CWD risk and submitted a portion of the animal to the Wyoming Game and Fish Department for testing before having the meat deboned for transport home. After the animal tested positive for CWD, Wyoming officials contacted the hunter and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.

    Indiana DNR officials disposed of the meat, but the hunter was allowed to keep the mount, according to Dr Jennifer Strasser, a veterinarian with the Indiana Board of Animal Health and a state conservation officer. "As long as the skull cap and cape are cleaned properly, the hunter can safely keep the mount," she said. The Indiana DNR (Department of Natural Resources) has tight restrictions on transporting deer, elk, and other cervids into the state. For information go to <http://www.in.gov/dnr/deerhealth/cwd.htm>.

    -- communicated by: Terry S Singeltary Sr <[email protected]>

    [The article does not tell us if the head and cape were cleaned by the hunter or by a professional taxidermist. Neither does the article indicate how this was verified, or if it was verified. If it were done by a taxidermist then one must wonder where the taxidermist is located, in Wyoming or Indiana, or some other state. In the past Indiana had no regulations regarding disposal of offal associated with a head mount and Indiana DNR had no way to track such either. Unless something has changed, the Indiana DNR did not have a complete list of taxidermists within the state. Without such a list or regulation of how the offal for a head/cape mount are to be disposed of it is possible that CWD could have been allowed to enter the state. - Mod.TG

    The US states of Wyoming and Indiana can be located on the HealthMap/ProMED-mail interactive map at <http://healthmap.org/promed?v=40,-97.6,4>. - CopyEd.MJ]

    https://michigan-sportsman.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1837107

    https://www.michigan-sportsman.com/forum/showthread.php?t=23313

    http://www.biggamehunt.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=7603

    but the hunter was allowed to keep the mount, according to Dr. Jennifer Strasser, a veterinarian with the Indiana Board of Animal Health and a state conservation officer. "As long as the skull cap and cape are cleaned properly, the hunter can safely keep the mount," she said.? <<<

    i think it's foolish. in my opinion, the complete carcass should have been incinerated, including the head mount.

    What actions have been taken to prevent the spread of CWD? The movement of high-risk carcass parts (brain, spinal cord, lymph tissues) is a potential avenue through which CWD could be spread from infected areas. Investigations in New York indicate that the infection could have been spread by a taxidermist who accepted specimens from CWD-positive states, allowed rehabilitated fawns access to the taxidermy workshop and spread potentially infectious curing salt waste as a fence line weed killer on his deer farm. Several states, including Pennsylvania, have developed regulations to prohibit the importation of high-risk carcass parts from CWD endemic states. As of April 1, 2006 Pennsylvania's importation ban prohibits the importation of high-risk carcass parts from Colorado, Illinois, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York (CWD containment area only), South Dakota, Utah, West Virginia (Hampshire County only), Wisconsin, Wyoming and the Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. Pennsylvanians hunting in CWD-positive areas should get their animals tested and should leave high-risk carcass parts in the area where the animal was hunted.

    http://www.pgc.state.pa.us/pgc/cwp/view.asp?a=458&q=168948

    The movement of high-risk carcass parts (brain, spinal cord, lymph tissues) is a potential avenue through which CWD could be spread from infected areas. Investigations in New York indicate that the infection could have been spread by a taxidermist who accepted specimens from CWD-positive states, allowed rehabilitated fawns access to the taxidermy workshop and spread potentially infectious curing salt waste as a fence line weed killer on his deer farm.

    http://www.pgc.state.pa.us/pgc/cwp/view.asp?a=458&q=168948

    http://www.pgc.state.pa.us/pgc/lib/pgc/taxidermists_cwd.pdf

    http://wolftracksproductions.yuku.com/topic/874/t/Wyoming-deer-killed-by-Hoosier-had-CWD.html


    SNIP...FULL TEXT ;


    Tuesday, September 09, 2008

    CWD MICHIGAN UPDATE September 5, 2008

    http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/09/cwd-michigan-update-september-5-2008.html



    TSS
     
  2. terry

    terry Banned

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    State ponders lifting quarantine of deer breeding farms Posted by Ben Beversluis | Grand Rapids Press September 10, 2008 04:26AM Categories: State News

    State officials have found no chronic wasting disease in four deer moved from a Kent County farm where the disease was found for the first time in Michigan.

    While that's good news, the investigation now will expand.

    But state veterinarian Steve Halstead also said a plan is being developed to start easing the quarantine of some of the state's 559 deer breeding farms. Some, with the cleanest records and no ties to the infected farm, might see their quarantine lifted by the end of the month.

    The four tested deer were from farms in Osceola and Montcalm counties. They had been moved from an Algoma Township farm, where in August, a 3-year-old doe was found to be infected.

    The tests clear the "first tier" of five deer farms directly connected with the local farm. Now, the investigation will expand to the next tier of farms, numbering in the teens, that supplied or received deer from any of the first-tier farms.

    "Now we're looking back upstream, to herds that moved animals into those premises. We're looking where they got their animals from and sent other animals to," Halstead said.

    Because of the quality of Michigan's deer stock, the number of deer farms and a ban on importing deer from other states, Michigan farms have extensive movement of deer between farms.

    "So the whole state is pretty much touched by movement of deer," Halstead said. The quarantine froze movement to find any links to the infected farm.

    "It's big, and we have got to get our arms around this thing."

    In fact, the state has begun a five-year surveillance process to track farm-bred deer.

    Chronic wasting disease damages deer brains. It first was identified in 1967 in a captive mule deer in Colorado. It was diagnosed in free-ranging elk in 1981, in free-ranging mule deer in 1985, and in white-tailed deer in 1990.

    The disease, apparently transmitted through a protein, now is found in several states, including Illinois and Wisconsin.

    No diseased wild Michigan deer have been found.

    With the quarantine, the state is taking several measures to limit possible spread.

    All 51 deer in the Algoma Township herd were destroyed and tested. No others had CWD.

    The DNR also is culling deer from a "hot zone" of nine northern Kent County townships. Tests are not yet back on wild deer killed last week.

    In all, the state aims to test 300 deer from the area. Any deer killed by hunters in that zone must be brought for testing, and the DNR is strongly encouraging hunters to bring deer killed anywhere in Michigan to check stations. The state also has banned deer baiting anywhere in the Lower Peninsula. Bait piles encourage deer to congregate, which may spread disease.

    Meanwhile, Department of Natural Resources, Department of Agriculture and public health officials will host a town hall meeting tonight to discuss what is being done to assess and control the disease, any risks to humans and animals, and what will happen in the future.

    http://www.mlive.com/grpress/news/index.ssf/2008/09/with_more_deer_testing_free_of.html


    MDA-NewsRelease MDA-NewsRelease 9/9/2008 4:09 PM >>> FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: September 9, 2008

    Chronic Wasting Disease Investigation Results Released State Officials Clarify Deer Facility Quarantines

    LANSING - As the Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) investigation continues, officials with the Michigan departments of Agriculture (MDA) and Natural Resources (DNR) today announced additional negative test results for animals sold from the Kent County CWD-positive privately owned cervid (POC) facility to facilities in Montcalm and Osceola counties. Four animals were removed from Montcalm and Osceola POC facilities, submitted to the Michigan State University (MSU) Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health (DCPAH), and all tested negative. The Kent County facility was depopulated on Aug. 26; and the deer were tested and all were negative for CWD. The Montcalm and Osceola county facilities will not have to be depopulated.

    “We are narrowing the investigation and at the same time clarifying the statewide quarantine requirements for POC facilities. Getting results back in a timely manner assists us eliminating some facilities that received deer from the index herd and additional facilities that sold to the index herd,” said MDA State Veterinarian Steven Halstead. “Good records are essential in a speedy investigation and the owner kept excellent records. We want to make sure these businesses have complete awareness of what is required of them.”

    At this time, no live cervid may be transported from a quarantined facility. Whole carcasses must either go to a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) inspected slaughter plant, under official seal, or the meat must be removed from the carcass and no head, spinal tissue, or bones may leave the premises. Violation of quarantine is a felony and may be punishable up to $50,000 in fines and may include prison time.

    Shooting ranches are required to provide a consumer warning to clients taking de-boned meat off the premises. A clarification of the statewide quarantine is available on the Michigan Emerging Diseases Web site at www.michigan.gov/chronicwastingdisease.

    To control the potential spread of this devastating disease, last week the DNR banned the feeding and baiting of free-ranging deer and elk in the Lower Peninsula; and MDA issued a statewide quarantine banning the movement of deer from all POC facilities.

    The DNR will increase testing on animals harvested from the region surrounding the CWD positive Kent County facility this fall, and will greatly expand statewide testing efforts as well.

    The Michigan CWD response team is a multi-agency team of experts from the Michigan departments of Agriculture, Community Health, and Natural Resources. Michigan State University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture also participate in the disease investigations. -##-

    TSS