CWD found in Michigan

Discussion in 'Whitetail Deer Disease' started by Tom Morang, Aug 25, 2008.

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  1. Linda G.

    Linda G.

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    I, for one, along with thousands of turkey hunters if they only realized it, would be THRILLED if a ban on baiting and feeding of deer/elk drove the price of corn down, but it won't....so we'll still face the impossibly expensive issue of how to feed all those northern Michigan wild turkeys this winter, and now...without having the deliberate or non-deliberate assistance of all the people who put out chow for the deer.

    It's going to be a very long cold winter....
     
  2. tommy-n

    tommy-n Banned

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    I just went out and took the battery out of my spin feeder, there was NO corn in it but just for the sake of argument removed it anyway.
     

  3. QDMAMAN

    QDMAMAN Premium Member

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    Linda,
    Do you think that the corn that isn't going to be fed to deer will make a real difference in the overall price of corn? :) BTW, thanks for all you do for the wild turkey in your area!
    The upside will be a reduction in the price of ethanol which will benefit all the families struggling to make ends meet in this state. Of course they won't be able to go out and put venison on the table as easily. :hide:

    Big T
     
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  4. FREEPOP

    FREEPOP

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    There's a break even point on the ethanol, as to when it's cost effective.

    IMO, the percentage of corn used for bait is probably less than what the farmers lose per year. I guess the amount to be less than 1/2% and that isn't going to change anything.

    Let me reword that. I think the amount that is used for bait, is so small, it is insignificant in the cost of anything.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2008
  5. QDMAMAN

    QDMAMAN Premium Member

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    FREEPOP,
    You did know I was being sarcastic, didn't you?:lol:

    Big T
     
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  6. chevyjam2001

    chevyjam2001

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    Ninja I understand that CWD isn't spread by urine. The point I was trying to make is those urine and scent based products are coming from deer behind a high fence as well. It isn't just hunting operations. I would have to venture a guess that the deer are kept in even tighter proximity in those establishments since the opjective there is to keep up with demand and be able to "collect" the scents in a timely fashion.
    I am not against high fence operations but I think a double fence system should be required with at least a 25 foot gap between fences to eliminate any type of contact with free ranging deer. Lets not forget this also affects elk and moose and we don't have alot of those in this state to begin with when compared to deer.
     
  7. FREEPOP

    FREEPOP

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    Right over my head.
     
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  8. Chuckgrmi

    Chuckgrmi

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    I for one am glad to see the DNR put a ban on baiting if they actually do and not bow to the pressure that is sure to come their way. Let's put hunting back into hunting. Ban it state wide and let's get back to real hunting and I bet the hunting population will drop again

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  9. EYESON

    EYESON Guest

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    If I had to go with past experience the DNR will bow to the pro baiting public next year. I was living/hunting Wisconsin when CWD was found there. Baiting was banned for that year but after the economic impact hit all the little store and business owners started calling their state officials and guess what baiting is legal again. This happened even though all hunters that were polled said that they saw more deer moving during hunting hours. We ended up having our best year ever because the deer moved during daylight hours in search of food. So there is positives to not having baiting but there is going to be a huge majority that want it back. The people that I herd complain the most are the ones that hunted out of permenat structures. I do ask this question, how come everyone that sees the positives in banning baiting to slow the spread of this diease are not pushing as hard to put a end to the deer farming industry? It is a huge part of the problem, probably more so then the baiting. I for one am for getting rid of all of it, all it takes is one deer with CWD to escape from a farm to start the downward spiral. And just for the record I do not use scents so closing down this part of the industry does not effect me. The industry would then need to move to senthtic scents.
     
  10. duxdog

    duxdog

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    Get rid of all high fence operation, even scent collection outfits.-Damn things don't work anyway.

    My corn pile is there to attract the song birds.:lol::lol::lol::lol:
     
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  11. bentduck

    bentduck

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    DNR bans feeding and baiting of deer in Lower Peninsula
    Posted by Steven Hepker | Citizen Patriot August 26, 2008 11:55AM
    Categories: Breaking News
    The Department of Natural Resources has banned all feeding and baiting of deer in the Lower Peninsula.

    The first total ban on feeding deer in the region was prompted by the discovery Monday of a captive deer with Chronic Wasting Disease in Kent County.
    The disease, akin to Mad Cow Disease, previously has been discovered in wild and captive deer in Wisconsin and other states.

    "Baiting and feeding unnaturally congregate deer into close contact, thus increasing the transmission of contagious diseases such as CWD and bovine tuberculosis," agency officials said in a news release today. "Bait and feed sites increase the likelihood that those areas will become contaminated with the feces of infected animals, making them a source of CWD infection for years to come."

    The agency also announced a ban on transporting live wild deer, elk and moose to slow the spread of the disease.

    For more on this story, visit mlive.com/citpat Wednesday or pick up Wednesday's Jackson Citizen Patriot.

    Does this not beg the question .... Knowing what they knew, why in the hell did they wait until today to ban baiting. :mad:
     
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  12. farmlegend

    farmlegend Say My Name.

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    I think we know the answer to that one. Fear of angry hunters, fear of lost license sales. They needed to "cover" provided by the appearance of CWD to do the right thing.
     
  13. Whit1

    Whit1 Premium Member

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    Posts in this thread that get into the baiting vs. food plot argument will be deleted. That is not the topic and this topic is far too important to get into the tit-for-tat debate about that other discussion.

    If you want to have at it on baiting vs. food plot do so in another thread.
     
  14. Ranger Ray

    Ranger Ray Smells like, Victory! Premium Member

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    Sad day. It was only a matter of time.
     
  15. koz bow

    koz bow

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    To move this terrible news onto another chapter and to try to shed some positive light onto the issue at hand.

    It would seem to me that if all of my neighboring properties, pretty much all farmers, and very few die-hard trophy hunters, where given permits to go out and shoot as many deer as they can, to reduce the size of the herd and to collect the meat, they would be happy to do so.

    Let's just say, I invited them onto my land as well, and they went at it for 2 years, shooting ever deer they could.

    Chances are good that the age structure of my land would be changed dramatically by year three. The bucks and does I would have left, would probably be of an older age class, and would be much smarter after this two year period. The sound of a tractor would make them run. Mostly what would be harvested would be fawns (including lots of button bucks) and young bucks. The smart old does, and mature bucks would more than likely find ways to survive. They would also have better nutrition.

    Now looking at this same scenario from a bigger picture. Is there any evidence that this type of hunting, would then raise the overall age structure of the deer in Michigan, and in turn, in future years, create an environment where trophy class deer became the norm?

    So, in addition to balancing the age structure and reducing the population (allowing more feed per deer to exist) would the outcome be fewer deer, but more trophy deer taken in subsequent years?

    Just trying to find a positive angle here. Wonder what happened in WI??
     
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