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CWD Bi-Weekly Updates

Discussion in 'Wildlife Diseases' started by Liver and Onions, Mar 6, 2016.

  1. Pinefarm2015

    Pinefarm2015

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    All the measures I are listed in the CWD Plan. There isn't anything in the CWD Plan that isn't being implemented.

    The Plan spells it out and MDNR is following the plan. In fact, one of the most in depth and clearly spelled out portions of the Response Plan has to do with explaining the reasons for a baiting and supplemental feeding ban.



    "Higher CWD prevalence has been associated with human land development, which may be related to supplemental feeding, smaller home ranges, refuge from hunting and/or predators, concentrating deer on fewer patches of good habitat or overlapping space use...


    Management practices that increase carrying capacity may cause CWD to persist and even destabilize populations, especially where prions persist in the environment. Contact, and so the potential for CWD spread, between doe groups occurs mainly during feeding, and is intensified by supplemental feeding compared to natural foraging behavior. Supplemental feeding (and likely baiting as well) of deer by humans contributes to spread of CWD, causes habitat destruction near feeders, crowding, fighting and injuries, and starvation due to compensatory increases in population above carrying capacity. Alternative restrictions on the quantity of supplemental feed do not mitigate the potential for CWD transmission! Where supplemental feeding has been critically studied, "none of the feeding strategies evaluated substantially reduced the potential risk for disease transmission and banning supplemental feeding to reduce transmission is warranted".
     
  2. Liver and Onions

    Liver and Onions

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  3. FullQuiver

    FullQuiver

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    Who would be the judge if a couple acre corn field didn't get picked on time or at all if it was a food plot or a farmer who changed directions in harvest choices...

    Because the right to farm act seems a little more powerful than special deer hunter interests...
     
  4. swampbuck

    swampbuck

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    Food plots ARE supplemental feeding. They are not natural forage, ban them along with baiting.


    And the harvest of doe's, young bucks, and old bucks is going to take some encouragement for the habitat guys. So make it a stepped system.

    check a doe, get a 3 or less on a side tag.

    Check one of those, get a 4 or more on a side tag.

    Check one of those, and you get to start over again.

    That should fix it
     
  5. Pinefarm2015

    Pinefarm2015

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    They aren't in the Michigan Plan, nor have they been suggested in the Plan.
     
  6. swampbuck

    swampbuck

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    Or maybe hunters could just be honest about it, I am sure the deer stewards will be thrilled to follow the plan to the fullest.....it is about the health of the herd after all.
     
  7. FullQuiver

    FullQuiver

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    I understand but when the law is meant to interpret common sense I for one don't want to be the small farmer whose corn isn't drying down or is moldy and doesn't get it picked and is getting a ticket and having to get a lawyer to justify my farming practices...
     
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  8. Pinefarm2015

    Pinefarm2015

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    Nope. Why not give up the class warfare shtick and help us all get serious about implementing the Response Plan the biologists studied and came up with?

    Baiting and supplemental feeding has been clearly defined since the 1990's. Time to let it go.

    What is the Difference Between Supplemental Feeding and Baiting?
    "Baiting" is defined as putting out food materials for wildlife to attract, lure, or entice them as an aid in hunting. A person baiting wildlife must comply with the baiting regulations.

    "Feeding" is defined as individuals placing food materials out that attract wildlife for any reason other than baiting. Feeding for recreational viewing purposes must follow regulations for recreational viewing.

    For specific regulations, visit the Wildlife Conservation Orders page and see Chapter III (3.100 and 3.100a).

    Food plots, naturally occurring foods, standing agricultural crops, or food that is in place as part of normal farming practices are not considered baiting or feeding.


    Rules for Baiting and Feeding Deer
    In the rest of Michigan, the following baiting rules apply:

    "Bait" means a substance composed of grains, minerals, salt, fruits, vegetables, hay or other food materials, which may lure, entice or attract deer as an aid in hunting.

    Baiting is illegal in Alpena, Alcona, Montmorency, Oscoda, Ingham, Clinton, Shiawassee, Eaton and Ionia counties. Feeding of any kind is not allowed in all of DMU 487, or in Ingham, Clinton, Shiawassee, Eaton and Ionia counties.

    In the rest of Michigan, the following rules apply:

    • Baiting may occur only from Sept. 15 - Jan. 1.
    • Bait volume at any hunting site cannot exceed two gallons.
    • Bait dispersal must be over a minimum 10-foot by 10-foot area.
    • Bait must be scattered directly on the ground. It can be scattered by any means, including mechanical spin-cast feeders, provided that the spin-cast feeder does not distribute more than the maximum volume allowed.
    • To minimize exposure of deer to diseases that may be present, the DNR recommends not placing bait or feed repeatedly at the same point on the ground, and only baiting when actively hunting.
    In the rest of Michigan, the following rules apply to feeding for recreational viewing:

    "Feed" means a substance composed of grain, mineral, salt, fruit, vegetable, hay or other food material, that may attract deer or elk for any reason other than hunting.

    • Feed volume at any residence cannot exceed two gallons.
    • Feed may be no more than 100 yards from a residence on land owned or possessed by that person.
    • Feed must be scattered on the ground. It can be scattered by any means, including mechanical spin-cast feeders, provided that the spin-cast feeder does not distribute more than the maximum volume allowed.
    • Feed must be at least 100 yards from any area accessible to cattle, goats, sheep, new world camelids, bison, swine, horses or captive cervidae.
    Food plots, naturally occurring foods, standing agricultural crops or food placed as a result of using normal agricultural practices are not considered to be bait or feed. Food plots may not be planted on public land.


    3.100 Taking of deer; prohibited firearms, "bait" and "baiting" defined, conditions for baiting

    established in certain area(s); unlawful acts.


    " Bait" does not include the establishment and maintenance of plantings for wildlife, foods

    found scattered solely as the result of normal agricultural planting or harvesting practices, foods available to deer through normal agricultural practices of livestock feeding if the area is occupied by livestock actively consuming the feed on a daily basis, or standing farm crops under normal agricultural practices. For the purposes of this section, "baiting" means to place, deposit, tend, distribute, or scatter bait to aid in the taking of a deer."
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Dec 6, 2017
  9. swampbuck

    swampbuck

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    Well, maybe there needs to be some changes made
     
  10. otcarcher

    otcarcher

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    Yea right. He is too busy looking to vilify Anna Mitterling, and her position, to have time for that.
     
  11. otcarcher

    otcarcher

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    He knows that, and so does the CWD Alliance in response to his ridiculous email to them. The fact that he didn't share the response here should tell you everything.
     
  12. Liver and Onions

    Liver and Onions

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    12-6-17 update:

    http://www.michigan.gov/emergingdiseases/0,4579,7-186-81018_25806-357110--,00.html

    Lansing Core Area: 10 suspect or positives out of 11,119 tests. Roughly .09% or 9 out of every 10,000
    Montcam/Kent Core Area: 20 suspect or positives out of 2,441 tests. Roughly .8% or 80 out of every 10,000.
    Currently, the new guy in the game(Montcalm/Kent) is running a disease rate of nearly 10X that of the Lansing area.

    EDIT: Added the 3 from Kent county to the Montcalm/Kent Core Area.

    L & O
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2017 at 10:15 AM
  13. Pinefarm2015

    Pinefarm2015

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    What was their response to the criticism of the Response Plan?
     
  14. swampbuck

    swampbuck

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    I have nothing against Anna Mitterling. My interest is in the agreement between the MDNR and special interest groups, and funding of the same

    As far as the alliance response, Clyde. I made a mistake in putting that in a public area, but that wasn't a particularly important piece. You guys can see that one.





    _______________________________

    We received your Facebook question. Thank you for your conscientiousness in considering all ways in which CWD may spread. To my knowledge, there has been little, if any, research done to examine the role food plots may play in the transmission of CWD via contaminated environments. But, I’m not sure it is a high priority research need given what we already know about CWD transmission. Let’s consider the basics. We know that CWD can be transmitted from an infected animal to an uninfected animal by:

    1. Animal to animal contact
    2. Saliva, feces, and perhaps urine
    3. Contaminated soil (presumably from the prions being shed via saliva and feces)


    So, if the above are true, it’s reasonable to assume that any factor that causes animals to come into contact with each other at a higher frequency, a higher density, and a prolonged period of time, increases the probability that CWD will be transmitted. This is the logic being baiting bans. In essence, though food plots can improve nutrient intake and forage availability for deer, they are essentially big bait plots. The biggest difference I see between a plot and a pile of corn or a mineral rock, is that the plot provides a more dispersed opportunity for deer, thus likely creating a reduced probability (compared to a bait pile) that an un-infected animal ingests CWD prion-infected material.

    Again, none of this, to my knowledge, has been defended by science. Prudence should be the guide, here.



    I hope that helps!



    Regards,

    Matt



    Matt Dunfee

    CWD Alliance Coordinator

    Director of Special Programs

    Wildlife Management Institute

    (970) 556-5897

    mdunfee@wildlifemgt.org
     
  15. Pinefarm2015

    Pinefarm2015

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    It has been proven by scientific study. The very study used in the MDNR CWD Response Plan that makes it clear that natural browse doesn’t congregate deer like bait/feed is right there in the notes.

    The Nutritional, Ecological, and Ethical Arguments Against Baiting and Feeding White-Tailed Deer

    Studies in Texas have shown that fed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) can degrade rangeland by overconsuming high-quality plants and underconsuming low-quality plants.

    Guiterrez (1999) did not find that effect when South Texas deer were offered winter food plots.
     
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