Clover mix suggestions

Discussion in 'Wildlife Habitat' started by Cjs180, May 16, 2018.

  1. Cjs180

    Cjs180

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    Hello, new member here from central WI. I am planning to plant 6 acres of food plots in clover, turnips and oats. I have done the soil test which was a 5.4ph so I had 12 tons of lime spread which was slightly more than what was suggested to bring the PH up to 7.

    My question is, my local co-op has alsike, ladino, white dutch and red clovers. I should probably do a mix. Any suggestions on a mixture?

    Some of it will be planted for the fall and overseeded with oats for a cover crop.

    Thanks in advance, Chris
     
  2. YOTEANTIDOTE

    YOTEANTIDOTE

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    Chris,

    Need a lot more information from you to help answer your questions. How are you breaking up your 6 acres of plots?

    Is it high ground or low ground, alsike prefers wet feet and can survive being under water for a few weeks. What types of soil are you working with?

    Ladino and white Dutch are perennials and I believe all red clovers that can handle your climate are annuals (may be wrong on that).

    For best results plant clover in the fall with a cover crop such as the oats you want to plant but I have had my best luck with cereal rye.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     

  3. Hunters Edge

    Hunters Edge

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    I would suggest a mix of white dutch and chicory mix in your clover plot unless it is sand. Than if sand most likely any clover will get burnt out, in drought instead of going dormant.

    If you do not get desirable results with your turnips and oats. If you have good soil not sand or if you can irrigate if you have sand you may want to split field and see what works best. Half white dutch and chicory, and the other 3 acres a mix of red clover and alphalfa.

    If you have sand and can not irrigate you may want to look at small burnett.
     
  4. Cjs180

    Cjs180

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    The soil is on black dirt/sand. The neighboring farmer currently has alfalfa growing in a field of probably 20 acres. He apparently rotates it between Alfalfa corn soybeans and Oats. I've grown all the items that I want to in a soil that's much worse than what I'm dealing with now. I know everything that I want to grow will grow here without an issue. I just want to know what is a good Clover mix. All the fields are in Highland and they're not going to be wet. Like I said the neighboring Farm does fine with no irrigation.
     
  5. Hunters Edge

    Hunters Edge

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    Than a white dutch clover/chicory mix will draw deer in. Again if you do not get the results from turnips/oat mix (deer), than I would advise a alphalfa/red clover mix, even with a neighboring field having alphalfa.

    The reason for alphalfa and chicory is summer feed. Yes chicory will handle heavy frost but at that time of year can not keep up with heavy forage, compared to white dutch clover. The cool season in white dutch clover and red clover will handle late season and winter. Also white dutch clover and red clover will be there in the spring. This not only helps lactating does, but starts growing antlers on bucks, by providing protein.

    Another advantage of year round forage is keeping deer on or near your property. Habit eventually becomes behavior in animals.
     
  6. Groundsize

    Groundsize

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    Plant a variety so that they are all sweet at different times of the year between cutting. I would choose 4-5 types.
     
    smith34 likes this.
  7. Cjs180

    Cjs180

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    That is kind of the plan that I am going to take.