Can you offer any info on this gun?

Discussion in 'Firearm Identification/Value' started by harpo1, Jun 10, 2012.

  1. Rustyaxecamp

    Rustyaxecamp

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    100% Mauser. Not a Springfield.
     
  2. Petronius

    Petronius Staff Member Premium Member Mods

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    The M1903 Springfield was so similar to the Gewehr M-98 Mauser that Mauser sued the U.S. government over patent infringements and the U.S. ended up paying a royalty to Mauser for each rifle produced until our entry into WWI.
     

  3. Gil Martin

    Gil Martin

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    It has been sporterized. It is not a Springfield because it does not have the magazine cutoff. All the best...
    Gil
     
  4. Petronius

    Petronius Staff Member Premium Member Mods

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    This rifle has the Mauser bolt release on the left side of the receiver. Springfields do not have this.
     
  5. clattin

    clattin

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    I'm certainly no Mauser expert, but that is definitely not a Winchester Model 70. It looks like large ring Mauser 98 that has been sporterized. The Springfield 03-A3 was based on a Mauser action.

    Interesting looking gun. Looks like the original straight bolt handle was cut off and an angled bolt handle was welded on. I think the 2 "cut outs" on the left side of the action were probably for some sort of scope mount.

    I have a VZ-24 Large Ring 98 Mauser that I sporterized. They're fun to shoot!

    I suspect the guys at Mauser Central could tell you more about your nice piece!

    http://www.mausercentral.com/index.htm

    Chris
     
  6. harpo1

    harpo1

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    Thanks for the link Chris! You are absolutely correct about the cut out's on the left side of the barrel. That it where the scope was attached to the gun. My late father-in-law always said he wanted to have the barrel drilled & tapped to accept a more traditional style scope mount and I'd like to carry out his plans to do so. However, I'd hate to do it if it will take away the integrity of the gun itself as he was also an avid gun collector.

    *He also gave me a Henry 45-70 lever action that I know little about other than it's in premium condition!
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2012
  7. clattin

    clattin

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    Id say go ahead and modify it however you want. You don't need to worry about it retaining its value because once its been modified from its original configuration, which was done a long time ago, it no longer has the collector value. Its value now is sentimental to you and you can either keep it as is if you don't want to change it from how you got it or modify it to make it more functional for you.

    Again, im no expert but there are literally MILLIONS of sporterized mausers so they don't have any collectors value unless they were built by a highly respected custom gun maker. Lots of commercial actions were based on the Mauser 98 such as early Weatherby's, Win Mod 70, Ruger Mod 77 and so on.

    Shoot it nd enjoy it!

    Chris
     
  8. drdetroit58

    drdetroit58

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    I can tell you a little bit about what I know about the gun and more about the man as he was my grandfather. He made the barrels from car parts, steering shafts or axles I believe. The cartridges were all hand made in his shop and during my life around him his shop was in Royal Oak in his basement and latter in the seventies in the shop he built off his garage. My older brother would work in his shop nine hours a day pressing the bullets on the cartridges by hand. We would go with him when he would make delivery of his guns and mostly ammunition to area gun shops. Originally he was from Pennsylvania. His father, Hansom Elliott was an inventor and he patented one of the original designs for the aerator. He was a machinist and worked in the Detroit Armory during the war and also custom made some hand guns for General Patton. He was an avid gardener and grew vegetables in his backyard. Being of German decent he always drove a Mercedes and could tune it with his ear. He was married twice but he never told us much about his first marriage. His second wife Fern, my grandmother, had three girls, Beverly, Karen Kay(my mother) and Janice. Beverly was ten years older than my mother and grew up and lived in Traverse City where Otho and Fern lived for a time before WWII. Karen and Janice grew up in Royal Oak and Janice the only surviving member still lives a few block away from his home and shop. While I was quite small at the time my brother knows I little bit more than me and perhaps if you would like more information I could ask him for you. Best to you and I envy your ownership of that gun.