Best break action and where to buy?

Discussion in 'Air Guns' started by shell waster, Jul 8, 2018.

  1. Perferator

    Perferator

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    That is great “news”. Excellent. Thanx!
     
  2. Woodsman27

    Woodsman27

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    It's been about 3 years now since the reclassification. It was great news.
     
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  3. Petronius

    Petronius Premium Member

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    Yeah, it was stupid to need a purchase permit for an air pistol and then having to register it.
     
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  4. Yankee#1

    Yankee#1

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    Back on topic...

    If you haven't purchased an air rifle yet, Midway is currently running some very nice deals (~$240) on various models of the RWS 34 in both .177 and .22 calibers. This gun typically sells for $300 plus at most places...

    The RWS in .22 would be a nice gun for your needs...
     
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  5. lodge lounger

    lodge lounger

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    I have a Gamo in .177 I bought at least 20 years ago. It has spit out thousands of rounds accurately and without a hiccup. I haven't used it on coon-sized critters, but I can attest to it's ability to thin out smaller vermin, which I have done a lot of at my place. Confident with it out to 50 yards without a scope. If your primary objective is thinning out the rodent terrorists around your house and garden, an inexpensive Gamo is a worthy suburban ranch rifle.
     
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  6. stinkbug

    stinkbug

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    I have the Benjamin Trail NP2 in 22 cal. It has been great taking out chipmunks under the back deck. I have not had any problems.The only dis is it is not as accurate as I hoped it to be (I have tried many different pellets). Pyramid Air shipped it to my house for a fair price.
     
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  7. Perferator

    Perferator

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    Go to WallyMart and pick up a .177 bore brush and kit, Hoppes #9 and swab the bore for a thorough cleaning. Q-tips pushed through with the cleaning rod will spiff it up. That is critical and step #1. Also, check and tighten all screws.
     
  8. stinkbug

    stinkbug

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    I'll give it a try. Thanks for the suggestion.
     
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  9. Yankee#1

    Yankee#1

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    What is your definition of accurate? Are you trying to get dime-sized groups at 50 yards, or are you struggling to get quarter-sized groups at 20 yards?

    Go to YouTube and Watch Airgun Academy Episodes 31, 32 and 33. There's seldom any need to clean an airgun, especially a springer or a gas piston that shoots under 1000fps - and despite the claims, most airguns under $300 struggle reaching 900 fps with alloy tipped pellets.

    It's possible the barrel is dirty, especially if you're using alloy or jacketed pellets, but if you're shooting regular lead pellets there are likely two better explanations - (1) using the wrong hold and/or changing the point of hold on the forearm (most lower-end air rifles are more accurate and precise when using a light but consistent artillery hold) or (2) the scope (if applicable).

    Double-check your form when shooting (are you really holding it with the same exact grip on the same exact spot every single time?), and if it's scoped double-check all of the screws and just accept that if you don't have a higher-end airgun scope that you may occasionally need to tweak it. When I first started using an air rifle I noticed that moving my hand an inch on the forearm could shift the POI by inches. I also have several different air rifles, but use a Gamo Whisper with Gamo scope for tree rats at the bird feeder - with that springer, I noticed that I need to check/re-tighten mount screws and reset the zero on the scope about every 50 shots.
     
  10. Yankee#1

    Yankee#1

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    And one other note - it's not recommended to use Hoppe's #9 in an air rifle, largely because it's specifically formulated to remove fouling and powder residue, both of which don't exist in the barrel of an air rifle. I've never seen anyone post pics, but it's been proposed that continuous use of Hoppe's #9 will likely do more damage than good in these guns.

    With that said, manufacturer's love to use oils (etc.) on the barrels, largely a preventative measure to retard rust. I've been known to get a new air rifle and run a single patch of #9 down the barrel, it does a great job of removing any residue from the oils applied at the factory...
     
  11. Perferator

    Perferator

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    Hoppes does not damage the barrel and yes break barrels foul particularly near a choked area of the bore. The break barrel rifles I have owned through the years will gradually release spring seal lube into the bore. As far as accuracy, the owner/shooter of the gun knows what to expect through their own use. If you shoot squirrels around the yard at your usual distances and suddenly there is a miss when every other tme was a hit, that is your first clue. Clean the bore. And I dont care how or what your method is, just get the bore clean.
    Ever ask what oil to use on an auto forum? Or how to lube your chain on a cyclists forum? Same with bore cleaning among shooters. Hoppes...you may choose another substance, I dont argue that. But I will argue it’s proven use over many decades of firearm shooting.
     
  12. Yankee#1

    Yankee#1

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    Quite honestly, this answer is rubbish. I won't argue that Hoppe's #9 is a great bore solvent for firearms - but if it was intended for use in air rifles, then why doesn't Hoppe's include a bottle of #9 in their airgun cleaning kit - https://www.hoppes.com/cleaning-kits/air-pistol-air-rifle-maintenance-kit

    Why? Because airguns are not firearms and do not require a corrosive agent to clean the bore! Air rifle = no powder = no explosion = no fire = no residue. The ammonium hydroxide in Hoppe's #9 will remove lead fouling, but the vast majority of air guns (especially springers and gas pistons) do not shoot fast enough to leave lead fouling. PCPs and bigger bores are a different story, but I highly doubt he's shooting chipmunks under his deck with a .25 PCP.

    FYI, you're probably getting grease into your chamber because #9 bore solvent is highly corrosive on non-metal parts and it's eating your compression seals. You could replace your seals and start using the #9 synthetic blend - but again, most low-end air rifles don't require solvents...

    But then again, what the he77 do I know - I only got an A- in organic chemistry, have a friend in the ballistics/defense industry and hold 3 advanced degrees in science...
     
  13. Yankee#1

    Yankee#1

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    Also - your comparison with auto oil and bike chain lube drastically misses the main point. Your reply indicates that regardless of what brand you prefer to use, the car still needs oil, the bike chain still needs lube and a firearm still needs a bore solvent - I won't argue that logic.

    However, asking someone which firearm solvent they use to clean the bore on a springer air rifle is more comparable with asking someone to tell you the best 2-stroke oil to use for the 50:1 gas-oil mix in a 4 cycle engine...
     
  14. Yankee#1

    Yankee#1

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    Stinkbug - I have the Benjamin Prowler in .22 and personally I think it's a bit front heavy. I'm a relatively big guy and I find that shooting it offhand with an artillery grip and keeping it steady is more difficult than my lighter .177 rifles. I tend to overgrip the forearm, which results in more barrel drift and decreased consistency.

    Not sure what you mean when you say you've tried different pellets, but you should be able to get quarter-sized groups from your Benjamin at 20-25 yards. When you say 'different' - do you mean brand, weight, shape, or all three? I ask because when I got my Prowler I asked around, and found that these guns tend to prefer a pellet in the range of 14-17 grains. For me personally, I know in my gun that at 20 yards I can expect baseball-sized groups with 19 grain pellets, which I can improve to dime-sized groups with 14.6 grain pellets (both H&N brand). Many guys with a .22 Benjamin seem to also like the performance they get with Predator Polymags (in 16 gn and $$ per pellet) or the JSB Diablos (~15.9 gn) - again, they both fall in that 14-17 range...
     
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  15. stevieblunder

    stevieblunder

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    I think I cleaned the barrel of my RWS 34 about 4000 pellets ago when it was still new. It's so accurate that I'm afraid to mess with it. I do recall that no matter how many dry patches I ran down the barrel it dieseled so bad it sounded like a 22lr for about 10 shots. A good pellet gun has no problem keeping all your shots in a dime sized group at 25 to 30 yards.
     
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