Arrows to Bolts ?

Discussion in 'Crossbows' started by Leader, Mar 22, 2009.

  1. Leader

    Leader

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    Conversion from Arrows to Bolts

    I have a compound bow that I can no longer pull back due to a fall. (My old age has nothing to do with it.:lol:) I purchased a crossbow a couple years ago while I was trying to qualify for a permit.
    Being the frugal (Wife’s translation…CHEAP!!) person that I am, I would like to cut down some of the arrows I have to use as practice bolts for the crossbow.
    Bolts that came with the crossbow are 2216’s, arrows I have to sacrifice are 2018’s, 2215’s, a 2315, and a 2413. Some bent, damaged fletching, broken nocks, stuff I’ll never use for anything else.
    Does this idea make any sense? Can I find someone to do this for less then it would cost to buy new bolts?
     
  2. Liv4Huntin'

    Liv4Huntin'

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    It would be best to first check with the manufacturer of your crossbow to verify. Be sure to not go under the total recommended grain weight so as not to damage your bow.

    I'm fairly new to crossbows, so I can't answer your question outright, but you need to make sure the bolts/arrows are SAFE to shoot of course... i.e. nothing that will split or blow up when shot. Also, keep with the recommended nocks (moon or flat) that your crossbow manufacturer mentions when/if you have them converted.

    One place to start (after on here, of course) would be a good archery shop that is FAMILIAR with crossbows too... not just compounds, etc.

    Good luck, and let us know the outcome .... I may follow your example !!
    ~m~
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2009

  3. WILDLIFECOWBOY

    WILDLIFECOWBOY

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    Well most crossbow bolts that a aluminum are 2219's. Since the second two numbers are the thickness of the aluminum are you would be decreasing the spine of the arrow. Therefore I wouldn't shoot the arrows you have out of the crossbow unless you contacted the company of your crossbow. Also you would have to pay someone to cut down the arrows and buy new nocks for the arrows you would want to make into bolts anyway.
     
  4. Crowhunter

    Crowhunter

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    They don't cost a hole bunch about 6 or 7 bucks , I picked up some at Gander for under $3 each on sale ,3 or 4 should be all you need for now .Bud
     
  5. Leader

    Leader

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    Well I found a shop that will cut them but not fletch or nock them.
    Basicaly the guy didn't seem to know what he was talking about & wanted to sell me new bolts, not make some up.
    I'll keep looking for a shop that can at least answer my questions.
     
  6. GVDocHoliday

    GVDocHoliday

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    Very bad idea. Get bolts that are actually designed with the wall thickness and diameter having a crossbow in mind. If you try cutting down arrows that have no business being shot out of a machine like a crossbow you could see catastrophic failure in the arrow/bolt itself. Not a pretty scene.

    Now if you had 2216's or 2219's to cut down then you'd be good. Also, keep in mind that most ARCHERY shops will not have the equipment on hand to fletch crossbolts as they require a whole different mechanism all together.
     
  7. Leader

    Leader

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    How much difference is there in a 2215 & a 2216? Would extra length/weight in a 2215 make a difference? How strong is a 2315 compared to a 2216?
    Why can people shoot different sizes/weights in a compound & MUST ONLY shoot one special arrow in a crossbow?
    Just what is it that makes a 2215 so dangerous ?
     
  8. Michihunter

    Michihunter

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    Doc- Can you explain this further? Everyone I know just uses a a nock receiver adapter to fletch their bolts or just uses a regular nock to fletch and then switch over to a crossbow nock when they're done. What difference is there that a pro shop couldn't do the same?
     
  9. GVDocHoliday

    GVDocHoliday

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    That receiver for a bitz is roughly 30.00. Though it's a small piece, most shops I frequent do not have these receivers for their bitz.
     
  10. GVDocHoliday

    GVDocHoliday

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    There is quite a bit of difference. Mainly in the wall thickness. A 2315 is fairly weak walled compared to the 2215. Though the thickness is the same, the surface area of the 2315 opens it up to greater stresses.

    People can't shoot just any different size weight/arrow in a compound. There reason there are some many different spine ranges in arrows are for the different draw weights and draw lengths that are out there for bows. Bows are not a standard as every archer is different and imposes different stresses on an arrow due to the way to hold the bow, release, follow through, etc.

    Crossbows require stiff, thick walled, strong bolts to handle the extreme forces implied on them. If you're looking to go faster, there are several carbon crossbow bolts that are available that are very very stiff and strong but lighter since they're made out of carbon/graphite.


    To sum it up...crossbows can't shoot just any size bolt....just like compounds can't handle just any size arrow.
     
  11. Non Typical

    Non Typical

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    It boils down to KE, a crossbow stores sooooo much that when it goes off the shock would prolly bust the arrow (the back end will try to pass the front end up). This past weekend we had a show and we let some people shoot a few crossbows, one of the shooters place the cock vane to the side, instead of inside the rail, I had made the mistake of fletching them with 2" vanes all the same color, and when we retreived the bolt out of the target the nock was split, that is/was a lot of force.
     
  12. beervo2

    beervo2

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    GVDoc Holiday says it all above....

    Do yourself and anybody else that happens to be around you when you are shooting your crossbow a favor and don't just start cutting up different size arrows to use..Very dangerous....
     
  13. Leader

    Leader

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    Thanks, I think I understand now.
    A 2018 of any length or weight is weaker then any 2216.
    A 2215 of any length or weight is weaker then any 2216.
    Any diameter arrow other then a 22 is weaker then a 2216.
    Any wall thickness other then 16 is weaker then a 2216 except that a 2219 can be used in any length or weight.
    Crossbow bolts can not be made, you have to buy them already made just for your bow from the manufacturer of your bow.
    Shooting anything else will result in death to yourself and others.
     
  14. TOW

    TOW

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    Best to stick with the 22 diameter arrows/bolts.

    20 diameter arrows/bolts rides further down in the track and 24 diameter arrows/bolts rides further up in the track. This anything less or more can end up with the string jumping the arrow/bolt. That would be a dry fire situation. Not pretty..

    My first crossbow was a 185# Exomag and I shot cut down 2213s out of it. Excalibur had a 350 grain lower limit and that is what he 20" 2213s figured out to be. Yes, you can cut down longer vetrical arrows of the proper weight and they will work just fine. A 2213 is a 2213, a 2216 is a 2216, a 2219 is a 2219, no matter what it is shot out of.

    My present crossbows are TenPoint ProElite that I need to shoot 425 grains out of, so the 2213s will not qualify. My other TenPoint crossbow is a GT Flex and I can shoot the 350 grain 2213s out of it.

    Manufacturer's suggested weight is what is important. In fact if you shoot less that what they suggest you could nullify the warranty.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2009
  15. Pinefarm

    Pinefarm

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    Of all the things to save money on, this isn't one of them.

    First and most important, as GV says, the risk of something terrible happening isn't worth saving some $50.

    And second, arrows aren't accessories. Nor are broadheads. Guys will spend all kinds of money on bows, camo, GPS, rangefinders, calls, blinds/stands, etc. and then try to skrimp on arrows and broadheads. Remember that you're trying to kill an animal as quickly as possible and the best arrows and heads are mandatory. IMHO