anyone else?

Discussion in 'Center Pin Fishing' started by BMARKS, Feb 7, 2018.

  1. BMARKS

    BMARKS

    Messages:
    1,884
    Likes Received:
    2,731
    Location:
    Sanford
    when fishing smaller streams like the betsie pm or little m. i like to use my 10ft spinning rod. i have a 13.5 and a 12.5 and they are just cumbersome to me. rarely do i make drifts longer than say 50 ft and a 10ft seems to be more than enough for me. does anyone else do this. haha i always get kinda funny looks from other pinners but hey i dont care.
     
  2. ausable_steelhead

    ausable_steelhead

    Messages:
    5,891
    Likes Received:
    2,859
    Location:
    NW Michigan
    I run an 11' for the small streams, and 13-15' on the Au Sable. I do run my 13s at times on small water.

    When first started running bobbers on the Big A 15+ years ago, I ran a 10.5' rod and 6lb main with 4lb leads. I hooked a lot of fish once I figured out a pattern for myself. It wasn't pretty, but I got into quite a few nice fish.
     
    gotoith and hard head like this.

  3. BMARKS

    BMARKS

    Messages:
    1,884
    Likes Received:
    2,731
    Location:
    Sanford
    Yah I have been thinking about tying up a 11 foot switch rod to a pin rod. I think I would like that a little better. I have used my 12.5 on the betsie and I just felt like it was too much. Definitely have to watch for branches.
     
  4. JungleGeorge

    JungleGeorge

    Messages:
    555
    Likes Received:
    298
    Location:
    Ann Arbor
    I use a 10 ft on smaller river and I even wanna go smaller on a new spot I have been exploring . Like 9ft or 8-6”...
     
  5. vano397

    vano397

    Messages:
    559
    Likes Received:
    147
    Location:
    Rockford, MI
    I built an 11' CTS a while back, and haven't used anything else since (on a regular basis) I agree that 13' gets too long. Back in the day when this all started for us we were trying to get as long as possible, using spey blanks 15-16' long. I don't see the point anymore! Anyhow, there are a couple times when I will only use a 13' rod, but very few, with long casts and long drifts being about it. The 12' 6-10 or 6-12 rods I've been doing lately are really the perfect all around rod for Michigan rivers. We don't have a ton of spots where you have to bomb a cast while wading. Most of the big creeks are boat only, or from shore.
     
  6. vano397

    vano397

    Messages:
    559
    Likes Received:
    147
    Location:
    Rockford, MI
    Also, I did build the tip 2 sections of an 11' 3 pc as a shorter rod for trout. Salmon and steelhead are not the only thing that likes a natural presentation... Minnows and crayfish get gobbled by a ton of stuff in the summer and fall.
     
  7. flyrodder46

    flyrodder46

    Messages:
    4,115
    Likes Received:
    3,436
    Location:
    Fort Wayne, In.
    I have a 8'6" brush buster that I use on occasion on really small streams for trout and it works pretty good. It is a spinning rod that I just put my CP reel on with no problems. If I was to get a dedicated CP rod I think it would probably be around a 10-10.5 rod as the 8'6" is a little to short in most cases.

    D
     
  8. BMARKS

    BMARKS

    Messages:
    1,884
    Likes Received:
    2,731
    Location:
    Sanford
    I agree completely. when i was first learning to fish the centerpin i read all the articles and watched all the videos. went out and got a setup, and after a while it just seemed like wow do i really need this long a** rod. so i went to the 12.5, then after 10 or so outings i decided to try using my 10 ft spinning rod. and i like it so much better. just easier to handle and lighter for a long days fish. i think the 11 would be a good middle ground too. and the lighter weight fly blanks would be easier on the arm.
     
  9. Sean065

    Sean065

    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    56
    Location:
    Freeland
    I don't know if 6 inches makes a difference for you but rainshadow makes two 11'6" blanks that are designed for centerpinning. I built one, and it really is far easier to cast an 11'6" than the 9'6" I started with.
     
  10. BMARKS

    BMARKS

    Messages:
    1,884
    Likes Received:
    2,731
    Location:
    Sanford
    I have heard good things about rainshadow blanks but I have no experience. I will take a better look at them now. Thanks forthe input. Maybe I can find someone with one on the river sometime.
     
  11. wyandot

    wyandot

    Messages:
    1,577
    Likes Received:
    1,708
    Location:
    Cheboygan
    I built a 10'8" switch blank into a centerpin and it's just about the ideal length for my local trout streams. I'm still not giving up my 13'ers for bigger, deeper water, especially where you're limited to bank fishing.
     
    Treven and mquinnan like this.
  12. slightofhand

    slightofhand

    Messages:
    890
    Likes Received:
    632
    Location:
    Bay City
    11’6” is a perfect length for almost anything. It all depends on what your mending situation is. If you are in a boat or wading then generally you have better chances of positioning directly up from your drift or close to it. If you shore fish then a 13 might be better if you have to pick up more line to mend without pulling your float out of your seam. The longer rods are nicer though for being able to fish a wide variety of Leader sizes and not blow them up. Some blanks can fish 6 all the way up to 12 Leader and can be both soft enough and stout enough for both. You will see different blends of carbon being used in the same blank to do this (40 ton or 50 ton) and a longer blank allows for that construction capability