Another switchgrass question, sorry:

Discussion in 'Whitetail Deer Habitat' started by millbs, Feb 21, 2018.

  1. millbs

    millbs

    Messages:
    646
    Likes Received:
    663
    Location:
    Lakeview
    Hey guys, another switchgrass question for ya. I wish I could say it will be the last but it’s doubtful. :)
    I broadcast about 7 pounds per acre on 3 of the flat acres that I have a few days ago. Then we got 3” of rain.
    Will it be ok or do you think it might have gotten washed away or washed together in clumps and I should broadcast some more?
    Thanks for all the help fellas!!

    1124AD6B-7A3E-45DA-9E34-5C866A15981E.jpeg
     
  2. limige

    limige

    Messages:
    9,081
    Likes Received:
    450
    Location:
    nw lp, mi
    I'm sorry I can't help with your situation but I do like packing with a cultipacker for this reason. The seed will settle in the troughs and have the appearance of being drilled. It won't tend to puddle up which I'm guessing is what you will see

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Michigan Sportsman mobile app
     
    Wild Thing and millbs like this.

  3. ckosal

    ckosal Addicted2hunting4 Premium Member

    Messages:
    882
    Likes Received:
    1,763
    Location:
    Thumb
    I am waiting for mine for another 4 weeks. Late March. 3rd weekend likely.
     
    millbs likes this.
  4. OSXer

    OSXer

    Messages:
    2,660
    Likes Received:
    213
    Location:
    Howell
    It might have puddled together, but I wouldn't broadcast anymore personally. Too dense of a stand is actually worse and IMO, your seeding rate is already high by 20-30%.
     
    farmlegend, millbs and bigal06 like this.
  5. cakebaker

    cakebaker

    Messages:
    2,382
    Likes Received:
    2,137
    Location:
    USA
    I'd say you're fine , looks like a level area and a decent amount of thatch.
     
    millbs likes this.
  6. TrailMarker

    TrailMarker

    Messages:
    972
    Likes Received:
    1,135
    I have seen successful stands that were too dense by most standards. Lay down in it sometime, feels like a crunchy air mattress. They also like to bed on the backside of the dense areas, they use it as a windbreak.
     
    Walt Donaldson, millbs and cakebaker like this.
  7. cakebaker

    cakebaker

    Messages:
    2,382
    Likes Received:
    2,137
    Location:
    USA
    IMG_20180225_151429793_HDR.jpg
    Frostseeded spot that grew in somewhat wet area.
     
  8. hunterrep

    hunterrep

    Messages:
    2,788
    Likes Received:
    959
    Location:
    South Central Michigan
    As other suggested, I would not reseed. So what if you have a few bare patches in your field. That isn't a terrible thing and can always be reseeded later. You don't want to get it too thick.
    If I was allowed by my CRP contract, I would spray some spots in my field and plant some trees or bushes (structure). Structure in the middle of a NWSG field is where you will find deer bedded.
     
    Dish7 likes this.
  9. TrailMarker

    TrailMarker

    Messages:
    972
    Likes Received:
    1,135
    I am in agreement that a few bare areas are fine, but still of the idea that you can't make it too thick.

    Maybe this, if it's a screen, a bedding area, etc., my thoughts are that thicker is better. If it's a CRP/switchgrass application that is dozens of acres, yes, plant at recommended rates.
     
    hunterrep likes this.
  10. hunterrep

    hunterrep

    Messages:
    2,788
    Likes Received:
    959
    Location:
    South Central Michigan
    You could be right about being too thick not being a problem. I haven't experienced that myself. My thoughts are, it doesn't really need to be very thick at all. In fact, all it needs to do is be able to hide a deer from "their" viewpoint. It doesn't take much grass to do that and the thinner the stand, the easier it is to mover around in and bed next to the clumps of SG that hides them. Keep in mind how big a clump of grass will eventually be coming from that one tiny little seed. It really does not take much seed at all to provide adequate cover IMO.
     
    Dish7, bigal06, sniper and 2 others like this.
  11. Jet08

    Jet08

    Messages:
    1,923
    Likes Received:
    2,406
    Location:
    Carleton Michigan
    My CRP plan allows it and that's exactly what I am doing!!! :coolgleam
     
  12. TrailMarker

    TrailMarker

    Messages:
    972
    Likes Received:
    1,135
    I agree, hunted a large CRP in Missouri with intermittent scrub trees and it had lots of deer.
     
  13. sniper

    sniper

    Messages:
    9,268
    Likes Received:
    20,448
    Location:
    Livonia-Hillsdale
    I occasionally walk through my 36 acres of crep fields and will find a ton of beds butt up to russian an autum olives bushes that have started growing...
     
  14. Dish7

    Dish7

    Messages:
    5,329
    Likes Received:
    17,678
    Right on the mark. The whole advantage of nwsg is that it grows in clumps and allows wildlife movement while still providing security. You're right, it doesn't take as much as you might think.
     
    Wild Thing likes this.
  15. cakebaker

    cakebaker

    Messages:
    2,382
    Likes Received:
    2,137
    Location:
    USA
    I love autumn olive.
     
    TrailMarker likes this.