Advanced osteoarthritis in knee

Discussion in 'Sound Off' started by Sasquatch Lives, Sep 28, 2020.

  1. Nostromo

    Nostromo Premium Member

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    It looks pretty good to me. Good luck with the birds this year!
     
  2. pgpn123

    pgpn123

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    How long have you been on it?
     

  3. Petronius

    Petronius Staff Member Premium Member Mods

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    Soon you'll be able to "leap tall building in a single bound".
     
  4. Firefighter

    Firefighter

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    My buddy is a firefighter and ex army ranger. Had a partial knee replacement in his late 40s. Was fighting fire in 3 months
    pain free and ran a tough mudder shortly thereafter.

    If you need a replacement, do it.

    IMO, there's no medicines or holistic treatment that can rebuild a lifetime of wear.
     
  5. DecoySlayer

    DecoySlayer

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    On the Meloxicam for a few days. I have been on several others of this type for years.
     
    pgpn123 likes this.
  6. wolf76

    wolf76

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    I work in the OR as a medical device representative. I've seen literally hundreds of knees and hips replaced. These procedures are very well dialed -in. Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) is being preformed in surgery centers and having the same great results as the hospital.

    There is a newer non-surgical option called Iovera, which uses cryoanalgesia to eliminate the pain for 2-4 months. This is often used prior to surgery to allow people to lose weight and condition muscles.

    Always listen to your physicians and please consider my opinion as an opinion. I'm not a doctor - just a well educated rep that advises orthopedic surgeons.

    BTW... Meloxicam is a great NSAID with preferential affinity to the Cox 2 enzyme, which means its gentler on your gut.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
     
  7. pgpn123

    pgpn123

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    Orthopedic doc agreed with primary that Meloxicam has less side effects. After taking a week the knees are feeling really good.
    He said over the counter Aleve is Naproxen but a smaller dose if I cared to try.
     
  8. yooperkenny

    yooperkenny Crazed Country Rebel

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    Glad to read I'm not alone i.e. Misery Loves Company....although I played baseball, basketball, and football for years and later hiked, backpacked and jogged extensively I never had any indications of knee problems until after I turned 50 and had meniscus tears fixed in both knees.

    BTW around that time the same surgeon put me on meloxicam, telling me that it's what he and his wife use. I've now been on it for years. It helps a lot as I've had joint inflammation not only in my knees but also hips, neck, back and shoulders, and although I'm prone to heartburn/acid reflux it has never bothered my stomach. My wife recently went on it for shoulder pain and it's given her 100% relief at least for now. Based on our experiences I recommend that anyone with joint pain and inflammation at least give it a try if possible.

    On another side note this ortho surgeon, who has a stellar reputation in the region as a skilled and tireless physician, shared with me that regularly riding a stationary bike helps to keep his knees healthy and is the only reason he could stand in the OR for hours each day. Apparently the motion of biking offers some significant and borderline magical benefits to the mechanical structure of the knees.

    A couple of years ago I returned to him as pain had come back to my right knee and asked if he could fix my meniscus again - he laughed and told me there's nothing there to fix because now it's bone on bone. Ouch! He offered a few things that might help put off knee replacement but basically told me it was inevitable.

    So on July 23rd (11 weeks and 1 day ago, not that I'm counting) I had my right knee replaced. I was off work for 6 weeks, going to PT 3 times a week and exercising multiple times daily. Since I returned to work (primarily a desk job) I've been going to PT twice a week, walking a mile or 2 daily, and doing some mild mountain bike trail riding. Getting my range of motion back has progressed impressively, as I can now bend > 125 degrees and can straighten to almost zero degrees - both of which are only going to get better. PT now is mostly about strengthening. Next week will be my last PT sessions as I've learned that whatever range of motion you've achieved by 12 weeks is probably what you're gonna have.

    The last couple of weeks when I'm not working or fishing I've been climbing trees, flinging practice arrows, sighting in rifles, and checking and hanging stands. I move slow and deliberately, but come Still-Hunting in the Snow time that'll be to my advantage. I'm sore by sunset, but a few rounds of icing (the ice machine is your joints' best friend) and a couple of extra strength Tylenol help me to get some good sleep and reset by morning. I'll turn 65 in December, but I live by the credo "If you quit moving, you're toast"

    Bottom Line - If you need a knee replacement and can swing it I highly recommend it. Good Luck!