300 H&H Magnum

Discussion in 'Firearm Identification/Value' started by Talking plant, Nov 26, 2012.

  1. Talking plant

    Talking plant

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    Location:
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    Is there anyone out there that can help me identify this gun?

    Thanks

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    Can make out "917 and ON" partially covered by the scope mount.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2012
  2. downrange

    downrange

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    Springfield conversion.


    Sometimes life is greasy.
     

  3. Talking plant

    Talking plant

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    Thanks Downrange. Can you point me towards any history on the process?

    So far it sounds like it was a Springfield (what, a 30-06?) that was remade for the larger round. I was told (was my gramps' gun) that it was a converted WWI sniper rifle. They turned it into a big game gun? Sorry, working off vague memories from my childhood.







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  4. Slug Gunner

    Slug Gunner

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    I would have a certified gunsmith look at it and make sure it is in fact a 300 H & H for starters. Is it stamped anywhere on the barrel or near the chamber??
    It's a nice looking gun and the 300 H & H is a very underrated round. With an updated scope, it would be a great big game gun for anything from deer to moose.

    Let us know what you find out for sure, I'm very curious. I'm a fan of the 300 H&H even though I don't have one yet.
     
  5. downrange

    downrange

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    Yah, would have origionally been a 30-06. These type of "sporterized" conversions were quite common. Some were quick hack jobs, some were real nice professional jobs. Yours apears to be more towards the better quality end. Markings on the barrel might be the only source of info for it. Any parts with the flaming bomb mark are original Uncle Sam. Its a darn nice looking gun tho!


    Sometimes life is greasy.
     
  6. 9mm Hi-Power

    9mm Hi-Power Premium Member

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    Offhand I would look at it as being a sporterized version of the U.S. 1917 Enfield rifle (U.S. Rifle, cal. 30, Model 1917.)

    Four reasons:

    This would jive with the "917" left on action bridge after someone with a heavy hand on the buffing wheel went at it before re-bluing .

    The end of the bolt on the Springfield had sort of a knob on it - your's doesn't seem to.

    The end of the bolt on the 1917 Enfield didn't have a knob on the end - like your rifle.

    The 300 H&H is a fairly long cartridges, generally to long for Mauser 98s or Springfields without some major modifications to the action. The 1917 Enfield, evidently, is long enough to accommodate the longer H&H cartridges without this modification. I had a gunny buddy who made a nice 375 H & H rifle based on this action and again without major modifications.*

    1917 Enfield action and bolt:

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    Springfield "knobbed" bolt:

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    When sporterizing a 1917 Enfield it was quite common to cut off the "ears" of the rear sight, if not the rear sight completely and convert the action to cock on opening instead of closing (like more modern bolt action sporter rifles.)

    If you look carefully at the bolt handle on this Enfield you can see the remnants of the U.S. Ordnance "Flaming Bomb" stamp identical to the stamped remnants on the bolt handle of your rifle:

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    Also the "dog leg" bolt handle on your rifle matches the bolt handle on the Enfield pictured rifle, unlike the Springfield bolt handle which is much straighter.

    In my opinion you have a U.S. 1917 Enfield rifle - not a bad thing at all.

    Hope this helps.

    Hoppe's no.10

    *Quote from another site:
    After World War I, a large number of M1917 rifles were released for civilian use through the NRA. Many were sporterized, sometimes including rechambering to more powerful magnum hunting cartridges, such as .300 H&H Magnum and .300 Winchester Magnum.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2012
  7. downrange

    downrange

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    O dang! You got it! The bolt gives it away. I got thrown because that huge piece on the rear of the receiver with the site is missing. Guess i should open the pics next time...


    Sometimes life is greasy.
     
  8. inland44

    inland44

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    Its a 1917 Enfield pattern, a VERY strong action and in .300H&H an awosome piece of family history. The E stamp on the safety stands for Eddystone, it was one of the Remington factories that produced them during WWI. If the barrel is not stamped .300H&H I would take it to a qualified gunsmith and have them do a chamber cast just to be sure. Honestly I would do that anyway just to play it safe.

    As someone else said it is a pretty high end job and not a "bubba's work bench special". Looks to have an vintage Weaver scope on it. If its just going to be a conversation piece that you might take out now and then just for the fun of it. I would leave it just the way it is.